CollectionsMiddle Ear
IN THE NEWS

Middle Ear

NEWS
June 17, 2001 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Betty Woodward set up a four-week course in American Sign Language at the senior center where she works, she had no idea how much interest it would generate. Woodward is program coordinator at the Friendship Circle Senior Center on the Mercy Fitzgerald Medical Campus in Darby, Delaware County. The instructor is her daughter, Beth Vail, 46, of East Lansdowne. The course is held each Wednesday morning in June, and its second session has just finished. Already Vail, who is hearing-impaired, has been getting numerous requests to bring the program to other locations.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
If there's anything worse than a pain in the neck, it's a pain in the ear. You can't escape it, you can't stop thinking about it, and aspirin doesn't necessarily make it go away. Lately, adults have good reason to be complaining about earaches. This is the beginning of allergy season, and earaches often are caused by allergies. An allergy to grass or trees causes the nasal mucous membranes to swell. The same reaction can occur to the eustachian membrane, the tube that joins the nose and throat cavity to the inner ear. And when this membrane swell, the ear aches.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Gov. Ridge is expected to leave the hospital today following a weekend attack of acute pancreatitis, an ailment more painful than life-threatening and generally not considered dangerous when detected early. The 54-year-old governor, a tall and robust man who prides himself on his fitness, was said by aides to be resting comfortably yesterday and watching NFL playoff games at Penn State's Hershey Medical Center about 12 miles east of the capital. He was to be discharged at 10 this morning, return to the Governor's Mansion and resume a full work schedule later this week.
SPORTS
September 24, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Ki-Jana Carter, the Cincinnati Bengals running back, has a torn rotator cuff in his left shoulder and could be out for the rest of the season, the team said. Carter, a former Penn Stater who was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1995 NFL draft, had the injury confirmed by doctors yesterday. Carter will seek a second opinion today and, if the prognosis is the same, the Bengals said Carter would have surgery and likely miss the rest of the season. The team said it did not know how or when Carter had suffered the injury.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A group of top public-health officials urged doctors yesterday not to give flu shots to most of the healthy people who request them before December, because the vaccine is in such short supply. The health officials want to save the vaccine that is available for high-risk patients - mainly the elderly and chronically ill - and are urging them to get their shots as soon as possible. Nearly one-quarter of the 75 million U.S. flu-vaccine doses projected to handle this season's flu will not be ready until after Dec. 1 because of unexpected manufacturing and distribution problems.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
My neighbor's child got the flu, which turned into meningitis, and he is very sick. Our children attend the same day-care center, and I need to know if the disease is catching. Also, can children be protected against this? The bad news is: Hemophilus influenza Type B bacteria is the most common cause of childhood meningitis, which can result in permanent brain damage. The good news is: Since the mid-'80s, a safe vaccine has been available for children at 15 months old. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration said infants as young as 2 months can be protected.
SPORTS
March 1, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
A Boston Red Sox fan all his life, Dan Duquette knows what it's like to have his heart broken by the team. Choking back tears as he said goodbye to his dream job, the former Red Sox general manager said he would be back at Fenway Park cheering on the team he ran for eight years before being fired yesterday. "I'm most disappointed that I will not have the opportunity to realize the goal Red Sox fans and I have shared for too long: a World Series championship," he said. The team's new owners, John Henry and Tom Werner, fired Duquette less than 24 hours after closing their $660 million deal to buy the team, its stadium and its television network.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In August, a 63-year-old man who had undergone open heart surgery in Ann Arbor, Mich., contracted a rare bacterial infection called mediastinitis. Normally, antibiotics could have effectively treated his infection and the man would have recovered. But in this case, the two antibiotics used - penicillin and gentamicin - did not work. The man died. "It was very frustrating," said Dennis R. Schaberg, the man's physician. "We determined that the bacteria infecting him were resistant to both antibiotics.
NEWS
February 16, 1988 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes, Christopher Stiteler has trouble paying attention in school, like the time his teacher, Ruth Ann Eichelberger, told him how to spell ambulance and he forgot everything but the first three letters. At 10 years old, he reads at a second-grade level and his words are slightly distorted. Educators at the Chester County Intermediate Unit say Christopher is learning-disabled, and they attribute many of his difficulties to the chronic ear infections he suffered during infancy and early childhood.
NEWS
October 7, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liam Paul McMahon was barely 2 1/2 hours old when he had his hearing checked. A nurse at Bryn Mawr Hospital attached three electrodes - one each on the forehead, shoulder and back of his neck - and slid on tiny earphones. Soon an automated program was sending faint clicking noises into Liam's ears, while a laptop computer analyzed his brain-wave response. Liam, swaddled in a white blanket with pink and blue stripes, slept blissfully on. Within minutes, a computer screen registered that his right ear had normal hearing, then the left.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|