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Middle School

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NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AN UNDERFUNDED New York City middle school is the main focus of "Brooklyn Castle," the uplifting documentary story of how a chess program transforms the lives of inner-city students. Director Katie Dellamaggiore profiles Intermediate School 318, where teacher Elizabeth Vicary's after-school chess program had such a powerful effect on children that it became part of the curriculum and produced national champions. What becomes of a program so demonstrably successful and obviously effective?
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside Nancy Lynn's sixth-grade classroom at the Warren G. Harding Middle School, students' reports - many decorated with crayon-colored covers - hang from a clothesline along a back wall. Glossy cutouts about magnets and electricity cover a strip of wall above the blackboard. Pictures of fall leaves - brown, orange, yellow - spruce up Lynn's bulletin boards. When the bell rings to signal the end of class periods, her students usually stay put. But just beyond her door, a flood of older students - seventh and eighth graders - pour into the hallway, clanging lockers and chattering among themselves as they rush along to their next classes.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to reorganize the Ridley School District by creating a middle school in the junior high building and moving ninth-grade students to the high school was presented to parents last week. Superintendent John Cochran told the 200 parents who attended a meeting at Edgewood Elementary School last Thursday that an administrative team has been studying the middle-school concept for more than a year and the research indicates that such a reorganization would be best for the district.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Sharon O'Neal, Special to The Inquirer
Phoenixville school board members have approved a plan that will create a middle school made up of grades five through eight, despite parent demands that the vote be delayed. Superintendent Carolyn Trohoski said the reorganization, which changes the junior high school into a middle school, needs to be in place by next September to reduce crowding in the district's four elementary schools. There are 1,848 pupils in grades one through six, 670 in junior high grades seven through nine and 548 students in the high school.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Ridley School District should turn its junior high school into a middle school, moving ninth-grade students to the senior high school, Superintendent John S. Cochran has recommended. Cochran made the suggestion to the school board at its meeting Tuesday night after he reviewed studies presented by two district administrators. Cochran told the board that he wanted the district to implement the middle- school plan by September 1989. Under Cochran's proposal, the district's seven elementary schools would house kindergarten through fifth grade.
SPORTS
September 5, 2008 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pervis Ellison is perhaps the area's most recognizable middle school coach. The former 12-year NBA veteran is the coach of the New Beginnings Academy's middle school boys' basketball team. New Beginnings, which has students in kindergarten through 12th grade, is a new school in Chester. "It's not my intention on being a coach," said Ellison, who resides in Voorhees, Camden County. "I'm just giving back, so to speak. I just wanted to help the best way that I could. " The 41-year-old Ellison, who sought the position, said he will not get paid for coaching.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
Consultants for the Downingtown Area School District recommended building a new middle school although it would cost $4 million more than if the district renovated a junior high. The Heery Program Management Inc. of Bala Cynwyd expected a new middle school to cost $15.4 million. Renovating and converting Lionville Junior High into a middle school was estimated at $11.4 million. The direct cost to the district would vary for either project, depending on the state reimbursement, consultant Stuart Lacy said Wednesday at a work session of the school board.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite some community and parent protests earlier this year, the Northeast will get a new high school and new middle school this fall under the final phase of a grade-reorganization plan announced Wednesday. The Samuel S. Fels Junior High School in Oxford Circle will become a senior high school over a three-year period. Starting this fall, the school will add 10th grade. The Woodrow Wilson Junior High School in Castor will become a middle school with sixth- through eighth-grade students.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
The Tredyffrin Easttown school board approved the appointment of D. Allen Wolstenholme as the principal of Tredyffrin Easttown Intermediate School at a meeting Monday night. Wolstenholme has been acting principal at the school since September. The appointment becomes effective July 1. The board also accepted the resignation of John Reilly, a teacher at Valley Forge Elementary School. Superintendent George Garwood said Reilly served 15 years as a classroom teacher and 12 years as director of personnel.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In an unanimous vote, the Neshaminy school board approved the appointment of Ronald Daggett as principal of Neshaminy Middle School. Beginning July 1, Daggett will replace Ward McMasters, who is retiring. McMasters has been the middle school principal for six years. For Daggett, now an assistant principal at Neshaminy High School, the appointment to run the 782-student school caps a long career in the district. "I'm excited," said Daggett, 52. "It makes it extra special that the school board and the community has faith in me as a leader.
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NEWS
January 4, 2016
YOU CAN take Charlie Saxton out of Bristol, Bucks County, but don't try taking Bristol out of Charlie Saxton. In from LA for the holidays, the 26-year-old actor ("Hung," "Betas") stopped by the Daily News in a brand-new Wawa hoodie and an old (kelly green) Eagles hat. Saxton plays roommate to the title character in "Cooper Barrett's Guide to Surviving Life," a sitcom premiering this weekend (8:30 p.m. Sunday, Fox29). He talked with Ellen Gray about his acting childhood and a few things that West Coasters just don't understand about Wawa.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
By Kate Shaw and Della Jenkins Community schools are receiving increased attention in Philadelphia, at the state level, and across the country as policymakers and practitioners strive to address the effects of poverty on academic performance and provide more comprehensive supports for traditionally underserved populations. Earlier this month, the long-awaited reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, now the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), maintained the three largest federal funding streams available to support extended day services or implementation of a community school model.
NEWS
December 24, 2015
Phoenixville Middle School was cleared after police investigated a bomb threat late Tuesday afternoon, the school district said. Events scheduled to take place at the middle school Tuesday night, including a boys' basketball game, were moved to Phoenixville High School, the district said in a statement. The building was cleared after an evacuation and bomb sweep, the district said. - Justine McDaniel
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Partnership announced Wednesday that it was awarding nearly $10.5 million to help charter school operators open five schools in the fall and expand them later. The School Reform Commission approved the schools earlier this year. The operators that received the grants currently have other high-achieving schools in the city. "These schools have helped to narrow achievement gaps for thousands of students in Philadelphia," said Jessica Peña, director of the partnership's Great Schools Fund, which made the awards.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission has found "probable cause" to suggest that Chestnut Hill College discriminated against a black student by expelling him for alleged theft while allowing white students suspected of theft and other offenses to remain enrolled. The college expelled Allan-Michael Meads in March 2012, weeks before he was to graduate, after disciplinary proceedings. The commission, in a "finding of probable cause" dated July 20, said it found no evidence to support that Meads "intended to deceive, steal, or misappropriate funds" collected from a student performance of A Raisin in the Sun to benefit the Lupus Foundation.
NEWS
November 14, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Tredyffrin/Easttown School District is among the elite of the region, but Chester County officials say it has at least one thing in common with every district in the county - and others across the country: students barely in their teens sexting. A fourth T/E student has been charged with distributing sexually explicit images, District Attorney Tom Hogan announced Thursday, in a case that continues to roil the district's middle and high schools, which are among the top-ranked in the state academically.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
PARENTS AT THE private Springside Chestnut Hill Academy met yesterday amid concerns over a middle-school teacher who wore a noose costume to a Halloween parade. Parents held meetings yesterday - one in the morning and one in the evening at two churches - to discuss how to respond to the school administration. The meetings followed an initial meeting at the school last Friday. One parent said in a telephone interview that she was "absolutely" offended by the noose outfit worn Oct. 30. "It calls to mind issues of lynching and suicide," said the parent, who asked to remain anonymous out of concern that her child would be identified.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WHEN Dana Dwirantwi first walked into Young Scholars Charter School a few years ago in search of a new school for her two boys, she didn't know what she would find. Now, with one son in seventh grade and the other recently graduated from the North Philadelphia charter, Dwirantwi feels as though she's found a home. "The teachers are so different from my experience," said Dwirantwi, of Northeast Philly, calling the school a "diamond in the rough. " "I got way more . . . communication, in terms of phone calls and texts and emails.
SPORTS
October 12, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
A largely unenforceable law might look good on paper. It might sound good to folks who think high school sports is wandering too far down the road paved in fool's gold by the professional and major-college ranks. It might feel good to legislators and educators and anyone else who wants to do something - anything - to curtail the culture of corner-cutting and rule-bending and system-gaming and look-the-other-way-ing that is putting down roots in youth and school sports. But a largely unenforceable law still is a largely unenforceable law. And that's the biggest problem with legislation proposed by State Sen. Richard Codey (D., Essex)
NEWS
October 3, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sweeping changes are afoot for the Philadelphia School District, with closures, conversions to charter schools, and even new schools proposed Thursday by the superintendent. In all, 5,000 students at 15 schools would be affected by the plan, which requires School Reform Commission approval. It has a price tag of up to $20 million. Though the plan drew swift protests from some quarters, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. called the changes "exciting" moves designed to increase equity in city schools.
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