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Middle School

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NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AN UNDERFUNDED New York City middle school is the main focus of "Brooklyn Castle," the uplifting documentary story of how a chess program transforms the lives of inner-city students. Director Katie Dellamaggiore profiles Intermediate School 318, where teacher Elizabeth Vicary's after-school chess program had such a powerful effect on children that it became part of the curriculum and produced national champions. What becomes of a program so demonstrably successful and obviously effective?
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside Nancy Lynn's sixth-grade classroom at the Warren G. Harding Middle School, students' reports - many decorated with crayon-colored covers - hang from a clothesline along a back wall. Glossy cutouts about magnets and electricity cover a strip of wall above the blackboard. Pictures of fall leaves - brown, orange, yellow - spruce up Lynn's bulletin boards. When the bell rings to signal the end of class periods, her students usually stay put. But just beyond her door, a flood of older students - seventh and eighth graders - pour into the hallway, clanging lockers and chattering among themselves as they rush along to their next classes.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to reorganize the Ridley School District by creating a middle school in the junior high building and moving ninth-grade students to the high school was presented to parents last week. Superintendent John Cochran told the 200 parents who attended a meeting at Edgewood Elementary School last Thursday that an administrative team has been studying the middle-school concept for more than a year and the research indicates that such a reorganization would be best for the district.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Sharon O'Neal, Special to The Inquirer
Phoenixville school board members have approved a plan that will create a middle school made up of grades five through eight, despite parent demands that the vote be delayed. Superintendent Carolyn Trohoski said the reorganization, which changes the junior high school into a middle school, needs to be in place by next September to reduce crowding in the district's four elementary schools. There are 1,848 pupils in grades one through six, 670 in junior high grades seven through nine and 548 students in the high school.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Ridley School District should turn its junior high school into a middle school, moving ninth-grade students to the senior high school, Superintendent John S. Cochran has recommended. Cochran made the suggestion to the school board at its meeting Tuesday night after he reviewed studies presented by two district administrators. Cochran told the board that he wanted the district to implement the middle- school plan by September 1989. Under Cochran's proposal, the district's seven elementary schools would house kindergarten through fifth grade.
SPORTS
September 5, 2008 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pervis Ellison is perhaps the area's most recognizable middle school coach. The former 12-year NBA veteran is the coach of the New Beginnings Academy's middle school boys' basketball team. New Beginnings, which has students in kindergarten through 12th grade, is a new school in Chester. "It's not my intention on being a coach," said Ellison, who resides in Voorhees, Camden County. "I'm just giving back, so to speak. I just wanted to help the best way that I could. " The 41-year-old Ellison, who sought the position, said he will not get paid for coaching.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
Consultants for the Downingtown Area School District recommended building a new middle school although it would cost $4 million more than if the district renovated a junior high. The Heery Program Management Inc. of Bala Cynwyd expected a new middle school to cost $15.4 million. Renovating and converting Lionville Junior High into a middle school was estimated at $11.4 million. The direct cost to the district would vary for either project, depending on the state reimbursement, consultant Stuart Lacy said Wednesday at a work session of the school board.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite some community and parent protests earlier this year, the Northeast will get a new high school and new middle school this fall under the final phase of a grade-reorganization plan announced Wednesday. The Samuel S. Fels Junior High School in Oxford Circle will become a senior high school over a three-year period. Starting this fall, the school will add 10th grade. The Woodrow Wilson Junior High School in Castor will become a middle school with sixth- through eighth-grade students.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
The Tredyffrin Easttown school board approved the appointment of D. Allen Wolstenholme as the principal of Tredyffrin Easttown Intermediate School at a meeting Monday night. Wolstenholme has been acting principal at the school since September. The appointment becomes effective July 1. The board also accepted the resignation of John Reilly, a teacher at Valley Forge Elementary School. Superintendent George Garwood said Reilly served 15 years as a classroom teacher and 12 years as director of personnel.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In an unanimous vote, the Neshaminy school board approved the appointment of Ronald Daggett as principal of Neshaminy Middle School. Beginning July 1, Daggett will replace Ward McMasters, who is retiring. McMasters has been the middle school principal for six years. For Daggett, now an assistant principal at Neshaminy High School, the appointment to run the 782-student school caps a long career in the district. "I'm excited," said Daggett, 52. "It makes it extra special that the school board and the community has faith in me as a leader.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A top Philadelphia School District magnet will expand next fall, and the Philadelphia School Partnership, a deep-pocketed nonprofit, is footing part of the bill. A $147,000 PSP grant will help pay for Carver High School of Engineering and Science in North Philadelphia to add seventh- and eighth-grade classes next September, officials announced Thursday. The investment in Carver - announced along with a $246,000 grant to the Friere Charter School to fund a strategic plan and new assessment systems - means that PSP has now distributed $35.4 million to grow high-performing city schools of all types.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ONE OF THE city's top magnet high schools has been awarded a grant to expand next September. George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science, which serves 750 students, will receive $147,000 from the Philadelphia School Partnership to add seventh and eighth grades, officials said. The new middle school will serve an additional 120 students and be closely aligned to Carver's science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum, a/k/a STEM. "Students at Carver High School are learning and achieving at high levels, and the school's leadership team believes they can offer this excellent education to younger students," Jessica Pena, PSP's director of the Great Schools Fund, said in a statement.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WHEN EMILY McCann, 15, walks into school Monday morning for the first time this fall, she isn't sure what to expect. "We already only had one secretary in the office last year, so I don't know if there will be one at all," said McCann, a sophomore at the High School for Creative and Performing Arts. "The teachers are probably going to end up having to clean the bathrooms. " That uncertainty indicates how things have gone from bad to worse for the financially distressed district.
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, athletic officials say they care more about blocking head injuries than blocking free kicks. The private Main Line school on Thursday banned middle school soccer players from heading the ball - the first school in the nation to do so - and also said most high school athletes will wear sensors to measure both the frequency and intensity of blows to the head. "We've seen a growing trend of injuries in our students, severe head injuries," said athletic director Mark Duncan.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
IN A SUMMER of gloom and doom, could there be some good news for the Philadelphia School District? The district delayed a vote last night on a policy that would eliminate TransPasses and tokens for 7,500 high-school students who live between 1 1/2 and 2 miles from school. Superintendent William Hite said the district is in talks with SEPTA and the city to resolve the issue. "We are working with several partners, and we think and are hopeful that we will have a solution to that and there's more to come, so stay tuned," Hite said during a School Reform Commission meeting.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"WISH I Was Here" is a Kickstarter comedy about a guy who needs a good swift kick-start in the rear. Zach Braff raised $3.5 million from online donors to fund the movie, the story of Aidan Bloom (Braff) - a jobless, rather shiftless young father who pursues his dream of being an actor thanks to the subsidy of his hardworking wife (Kate Hudson), as his disapproving dad (Mandy Patinkin) looks on. Braff's script describes a cutesy world in which one's own dreams, and the self-centered pursuit of them, are paramount.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying stricter federal nutrition guidelines are too much to swallow, the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District has decided to remove its 1,300 high school students from the program that is to go into effect next school year. In deciding last week that the students would not join the 31 million across the country who get free or reduced-price lunches through the National School Lunch Program, the district said its own food policies were healthy enough for its high schoolers. The district's middle school and four elementary schools will still participate.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
NEARLY 200 parents turned out yesterday at a Nicetown elementary school for a vote that should determine whether it will remain a traditional public school or be run by a charter operator. Parents and guardians at Steel Elementary cast secret ballots in the school's foyer from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., as the School Advisory Council cast a separate vote. The League of Women Voters of Philadelphia served as an independent monitor and tallied the results, which are expected to be announced today by the school district.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTER A vacant 1930s-era school is about to gain new life as an upscale apartment building in the City of Chester, according to a Chester Upland School District official. The Wetherill School, a classic stone building on East 24th Street, recently was sold at auction for $200,000 to Best Homes Co. of Glenolden, which plans to undertake the conversion, Chester Upland Solicitor Leo A. Hackett said Thursday. Two other vacant school district structures also have been auctioned. "That building is a fortress," he said, adding that the project would be a massive undertaking.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHELTENHAM The Cheltenham Township school board has dropped its plan to relocate two-thirds of its middle school students to Gratz College and will move them instead to sites in Cheltenham and Springfield Townships. The Montgomery County district has been scrambling since fall to find alternative classrooms for the 750 students at Cedarbrook Middle School, which is plagued by mold and expected to be uninhabitable by spring. At a special meeting Tuesday night, the board approved a plan to lease space in the old Pathmark building on Ivy Hill Road in Springfield Township, and at St. Joseph Parish on Waters Road in Cheltenham.
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