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Middle School

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NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AN UNDERFUNDED New York City middle school is the main focus of "Brooklyn Castle," the uplifting documentary story of how a chess program transforms the lives of inner-city students. Director Katie Dellamaggiore profiles Intermediate School 318, where teacher Elizabeth Vicary's after-school chess program had such a powerful effect on children that it became part of the curriculum and produced national champions. What becomes of a program so demonstrably successful and obviously effective?
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside Nancy Lynn's sixth-grade classroom at the Warren G. Harding Middle School, students' reports - many decorated with crayon-colored covers - hang from a clothesline along a back wall. Glossy cutouts about magnets and electricity cover a strip of wall above the blackboard. Pictures of fall leaves - brown, orange, yellow - spruce up Lynn's bulletin boards. When the bell rings to signal the end of class periods, her students usually stay put. But just beyond her door, a flood of older students - seventh and eighth graders - pour into the hallway, clanging lockers and chattering among themselves as they rush along to their next classes.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to reorganize the Ridley School District by creating a middle school in the junior high building and moving ninth-grade students to the high school was presented to parents last week. Superintendent John Cochran told the 200 parents who attended a meeting at Edgewood Elementary School last Thursday that an administrative team has been studying the middle-school concept for more than a year and the research indicates that such a reorganization would be best for the district.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Sharon O'Neal, Special to The Inquirer
Phoenixville school board members have approved a plan that will create a middle school made up of grades five through eight, despite parent demands that the vote be delayed. Superintendent Carolyn Trohoski said the reorganization, which changes the junior high school into a middle school, needs to be in place by next September to reduce crowding in the district's four elementary schools. There are 1,848 pupils in grades one through six, 670 in junior high grades seven through nine and 548 students in the high school.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Ridley School District should turn its junior high school into a middle school, moving ninth-grade students to the senior high school, Superintendent John S. Cochran has recommended. Cochran made the suggestion to the school board at its meeting Tuesday night after he reviewed studies presented by two district administrators. Cochran told the board that he wanted the district to implement the middle- school plan by September 1989. Under Cochran's proposal, the district's seven elementary schools would house kindergarten through fifth grade.
SPORTS
September 5, 2008 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pervis Ellison is perhaps the area's most recognizable middle school coach. The former 12-year NBA veteran is the coach of the New Beginnings Academy's middle school boys' basketball team. New Beginnings, which has students in kindergarten through 12th grade, is a new school in Chester. "It's not my intention on being a coach," said Ellison, who resides in Voorhees, Camden County. "I'm just giving back, so to speak. I just wanted to help the best way that I could. " The 41-year-old Ellison, who sought the position, said he will not get paid for coaching.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
Consultants for the Downingtown Area School District recommended building a new middle school although it would cost $4 million more than if the district renovated a junior high. The Heery Program Management Inc. of Bala Cynwyd expected a new middle school to cost $15.4 million. Renovating and converting Lionville Junior High into a middle school was estimated at $11.4 million. The direct cost to the district would vary for either project, depending on the state reimbursement, consultant Stuart Lacy said Wednesday at a work session of the school board.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite some community and parent protests earlier this year, the Northeast will get a new high school and new middle school this fall under the final phase of a grade-reorganization plan announced Wednesday. The Samuel S. Fels Junior High School in Oxford Circle will become a senior high school over a three-year period. Starting this fall, the school will add 10th grade. The Woodrow Wilson Junior High School in Castor will become a middle school with sixth- through eighth-grade students.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
The Tredyffrin Easttown school board approved the appointment of D. Allen Wolstenholme as the principal of Tredyffrin Easttown Intermediate School at a meeting Monday night. Wolstenholme has been acting principal at the school since September. The appointment becomes effective July 1. The board also accepted the resignation of John Reilly, a teacher at Valley Forge Elementary School. Superintendent George Garwood said Reilly served 15 years as a classroom teacher and 12 years as director of personnel.
NEWS
July 14, 2008
A consortium of Pennsylvania colleges including Temple and the University of Pennsylvania have received a $10 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to improve science instruction for middle school students over the next five years. Nonprofit organizations, state agencies and middle schools also will be part of the consortium that will create a national center for the work, called the 21st Century Center for Cognition and Science Instruction, Temple announced today.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
IF ANY presidential candidates want to "Make America Great Again!" I know some wise souls who can tell them how. These sages are all underage, by the way. But you know what they say about kids: Out of the mouths of babes comes brilliant, simple advice that usually stuns the powerful, because it's not about pumping up wealth or ego. But it can carry us farther than greed or swagger ever will. The advice comes via students at three Philly public schools whose recent projects get to the heart of what makes for a healthy, resilient, thriving society: Compassion and kindness.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
With her friendly smile, firm handshake, and stylishly oversize glasses, it's hard to imagine Eva Haydu, 17, not fitting in, let alone feeling unbearably sad. Yet not long ago, that was so. She didn't want to go to school. She gave up running track; she was too stressed, too easily tired. She was taken to a hospital because she felt like hurting herself. Some people at Gateway Regional High School "didn't understand how it feels to have anxiety," the junior said. "I was depressed.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Lisa Haver
IF YOU READ the paper or listen to the news, you probably have some opinions about the issues facing the Philadelphia School District. You know that Harrisburg's repeated slashing of education spending and its failure to come up with a fair and permanent funding formula continue to take a toll. Adding to that problem are questionable district priorities, which have resulted in: * More than 160 teacher vacancies, leaving at least 5,300 students without a full-time teacher this year.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Moorestown Friends School has launched an ambitious campaign to raise funds for a program that has been covering tuition and other costs for low-income students from Camden. The elite Burlington County school has already received contributions totaling nearly $3 million toward endowing its Camden Scholars Program, Head of School Larry Van Meter said. "I am extremely grateful to these lead donors for making such significant commitments to our school and to the Camden Scholars Program," Van Meter, an alumnus, said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
DEAR ABBY: One of my close friends may be "ghosting" me. "Sarah" and I have known each other since middle school. We went to high school together and roomed together during our freshman year of college. We both transferred to different schools after that freshman year, but we made it a point to keep in touch. I was the first person she came out to. I helped her move into her new apartment the summer before grad school. In general, I think I've been a good friend to her. Last summer, we both moved back to our hometown - she for med school and I for a new job. I was excited that after five years, we were living in the same city again.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
The allegations were horrific: Two football players at an academically elite high school held down a smaller freshman teammate trying to escape a hazing ritual, while a third used a broom handle to penetrate the younger boy's rectum. The three Conestoga High School students were charged with assault, unlawful restraint, and other counts - but not hazing. The lack of a hazing charge was the result of a "glaring omission" in state law, said Chester County District Attorney Tom Hogan.
SPORTS
February 26, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
Her closest friends say Taiah Thornton isn't a morning person. They say it as if they expect people not to believe it. Most have never seen Thornton without her trademark energy - laughing, talking, standing out in some way. She's usually at full throttle by fifth period, when the big three of the Camden Catholic girls' basketball team meet for lunch. "And once she starts," Julia Braungart said, "she doesn't stop. " You won't find many high school students with more conviction than Sierra Taylor.
SPORTS
February 21, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
Gabe Villegas says he looks up to his brother, Jon. He says it's a blessing to have a highly respected family member a grade ahead of him at Highland High School. He just doesn't like his older sibling's game. And the feeling is mutual. "He's the basketball player, I'm the wrestler," Jon Villegas said of the unique sports situation between the brothers. This has been a banner winter sports season at Highland, as the girls' and boys' basketball teams each have won Tri-County Royal Division titles (with a combined record of 23-1 in division play)
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | Natalie Pompilio
Natalie Pompilio is a Philadelphia writer Gathered in a classroom at Bristol Township's Harry S Truman High School, about 25 students from Drummers With Attitude are showing me what each can do with two sticks and an overturned bucket. And while the music was incredible, the change in some of the players is even more stunning. The boy who hadn't looked me in the eyes when I arrived? He is flipping his sticks in his hands and casting me side looks, grinning. Another teenager, who told me he doesn't like to show emotion, has his eyes closed and his lips slightly open as he plays, moving his body to the beat.
SPORTS
February 3, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
ONE OF THE MORE remarkable players at Super Bowl 50 won't play a snap. He is remarkable only partly because of football. Charles Tillman ended his 13th season, and possibly his career, with a torn ACL in the Panthers' regular-season finale. Thanks to a clever memoir aimed at the massive pre-teen book market, Tillman's legacy will encompass much more than appearances in two Super Bowls and two Pro Bowls. The Middle School Rules of Charles 'Peanut' Tillman (BroadStreet Publishing, $14.99 hardcover)
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