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NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Mary Clare Jalonick and Connie Cass, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Kids, your days of blowing off those healthier school lunches and filling up on cookies from the vending machine are numbered. The government is on to you. For the first time, the Agriculture Department is telling schools what sorts of snacks they can sell. The new restrictions announced Thursday fill a gap in nutrition rules that allowed many students to load up on fat, sugar, and salt despite the guidelines for healthy meals. "Parents will no longer have to worry that their kids are using their lunch money to buy junk food and junk drinks at school," said Margo Wootan, a nutrition lobbyist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest who pushed for the new rules.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY SOFIYA BALLIN, Daily News Staff Writer ballins@phillynews.com, 215-854-5902
BEFORE The Roots hit the stage at Penn's Landing tomorrow for their sixth annual picnic, lead MC Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter will hit the pavement for the GrassROOTs Community Foundation's first Roots, Rock, RUN (a 3K) to support the health and wellness CHICKS programs for girls at Harding Middle School. "Our job is to cheer the girls on and to really support them," said foundation President Janice Johnson-Dias. The girls, age 12-14, will run with their teachers and parents outside their middle school.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Rita Giordano and Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writers
Friday was going to be a big day for the seniors of Penn Wood High School, the day they would get to buy prom tickets. "All of us have been talking about prom since January," Sabreen Abbass, 17, said. "All of us had our passes to come down and buy our prom tickets. We all had our dresses. " Instead, she had a day off she didn't want. She and her friends will get to buy their prom tickets eventually, but they don't know when or where. A blaze early Thursday that officials have declared arson has barred them from their Lansdowne school, its walls charred and windows boarded.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two days before the School Reform Commission was scheduled to vote on closing Beeber Middle School, parent Katherine Stokes' phone rang. Beeber had been spared. Bowing to concerns about safety and a lack of choice for families, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. rescinded the recommendation Tuesday. Officials will instead work with the community to explore developing an arts academy to attract more students to the school. "We're just utilizing the recommendations that the community put forward," Hite said.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two days before the School Reform Commission was scheduled to vote on closing Beeber Middle School, parent Katherine Stokes' phone rang. Beeber was spared, Stokes and others in the community said. It's been a roller-coaster ride for the school, which was not on the Philadelphia School District's initial closing list, but got put on a revised list, along with M.H. Stanton Elementary School in North Philadelphia. Officials informed the Beeber community Tuesday that it was being taken off the closing list.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Two schools spent Thursday morning in lockdown as a SWAT team descended on the city's Feltonville section in response to a fabricated story by four adolescent students who said they were victims of a gun incident, authorities said. The children, ages 10 through 13, students at the Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences, falsely accused a woman of pointing a "long gun" at them as they were walking to school, according to police. Authorities took the report seriously, letting no one in or out of the middle school or Barton Elementary, a kindergarten-through-second grade school on the same campus.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A former administrator at Truebright Science Academy Charter School testified Thursday that the school lacked a curriculum, provided no services for students whose first language was not English, and told the Philadelphia School District it offered advanced courses that did not exist. During a hearing to determine whether Truebright deserves to have its charter renewed, Susan Farley-Ellison detailed the North Philadelphia school's academic shortcomings. Farley-Ellison, the school's supervisor of curriculum and instruction in 2010-11, said the school had textbooks but lacked a curriculum because the charter's chief executive told her the school could not afford one. She said the school did not have a program for students whose first language was not English.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two schools spent Thursday morning in lockdown as a SWAT team descended on the city's Feltonville section Thursday, all in response to a fabricated story by four adolescent students who said they were victims of a gun incident, authorities said. The children, ages 10 through 13, students at the Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences, falsely accused a woman of pointing a "long gun" at them as they were walking to school, according to police. Authorities took the report seriously, letting no one in or out of the middle school or Barton Elementary, a kindergarten through second grade school on the same campus.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
METAL DETECTORS in elementary schools? Hell, yeah. Think that's a knee-jerk reaction? Well, not any more than the hand-wringing over the - gasp - sorry state of our society if we'd - shudder - stoop to such a thing. The reaction to Philadelphia school officials merely discussing the idea was typical: What message would it send? What proof is there that they work? There has to be another way. Safety doesn't come from metal detectors. It comes from community, good parenting . . . the Easter Bunny.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nan Weinberg's son, a fifth grader at James Johnson Elementary School in Cherry Hill, had been convinced that he wanted to go to Beck Middle School next year. " 'I don't even want to think about Rosa,' " Weinberg recalls her son, Cole, saying, dismissing his other option for middle school in the district. After attending an open house at Rosa International Middle School, however, he changed his mind. "He just felt more comfortable there," Weinberg said. He couldn't get too excited, though.
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