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Middle School

NEWS
November 11, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
PARENTS AT THE private Springside Chestnut Hill Academy met yesterday amid concerns over a middle-school teacher who wore a noose costume to a Halloween parade. Parents held meetings yesterday - one in the morning and one in the evening at two churches - to discuss how to respond to the school administration. The meetings followed an initial meeting at the school last Friday. One parent said in a telephone interview that she was "absolutely" offended by the noose outfit worn Oct. 30. "It calls to mind issues of lynching and suicide," said the parent, who asked to remain anonymous out of concern that her child would be identified.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WHEN Dana Dwirantwi first walked into Young Scholars Charter School a few years ago in search of a new school for her two boys, she didn't know what she would find. Now, with one son in seventh grade and the other recently graduated from the North Philadelphia charter, Dwirantwi feels as though she's found a home. "The teachers are so different from my experience," said Dwirantwi, of Northeast Philly, calling the school a "diamond in the rough. " "I got way more . . . communication, in terms of phone calls and texts and emails.
SPORTS
October 12, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
A largely unenforceable law might look good on paper. It might sound good to folks who think high school sports is wandering too far down the road paved in fool's gold by the professional and major-college ranks. It might feel good to legislators and educators and anyone else who wants to do something - anything - to curtail the culture of corner-cutting and rule-bending and system-gaming and look-the-other-way-ing that is putting down roots in youth and school sports. But a largely unenforceable law still is a largely unenforceable law. And that's the biggest problem with legislation proposed by State Sen. Richard Codey (D., Essex)
NEWS
October 3, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sweeping changes are afoot for the Philadelphia School District, with closures, conversions to charter schools, and even new schools proposed Thursday by the superintendent. In all, 5,000 students at 15 schools would be affected by the plan, which requires School Reform Commission approval. It has a price tag of up to $20 million. Though the plan drew swift protests from some quarters, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. called the changes "exciting" moves designed to increase equity in city schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
One real pleasure of being a longtime viewer of Philadelphia's theater scene is watching talented young students grow from bit-part standouts to full-fledged leading men and women. Jennifer Kidwell and Scott Sheppard, co-artistic directors of Lightning Rod Special and graduates of the Pig Iron School for Advanced Performance Training's inaugural class, break out big time with Underground Railroad Game , a funny, poignant take on racial politics as embodied by a pair of middle school teachers.
SPORTS
August 28, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
IF YOU remember offensive tackle Jonathan Martin at all, it's likely because he was the guy bullied by Dolphins teammate Richie Incognito in 2013. Martin, drafted by Miami out of Stanford in 2012, played for the 49ers last season, and was with the Panthers when he retired in July due to a back injury. Turns out he was hurting in other ways, too. Yesterday, the 26-year-old Martin reached out to others who've been bullied in an insightful essay on Facebook. He started by writing he wasn't accepted by others in high school because he "was neither black nor white.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
An investigation by Haddonfield School District engineers has revealed structural problems at J. Fithian Tatem Elementary School and the high school's main gymnasium and cafeteria that require stabilization. The buildings will be safe for use this school year, but some students and functions will have to be moved or rerouted, Superintendent Richard Perry said Monday. About $1.4 million in reserve funds is being used to address the problems, but to permanently correct the issues at the high school, the district will have go to a bond referendum to seek the needed funds, he said.
NEWS
August 22, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission moved Thursday night to block a proposed charter school's new application and to sell two unused buildings. Esperanza Elementary Charter School first came before the SRC in the winter, hoping to open a school in North Philadelphia. It already operates a charter high school and middle school in the area. The SRC turned down the application in February and denied it again Thursday, saying that although Esperanza has excelled at the high school level, its performance has been uneven for middle school.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the city's top high schools just got more support for its newest venture, a middle school launching in the fall. Carver High School for Engineering and Science, which is expanding to serve 120 seventh and eighth graders in September, has been awarded $200,000 from the Philadelphia School Partnership, officials announced Thursday. That's on top of a $147,000 grant that PSP, a deep-pocketed nonprofit, already awarded to Carver to fund planning for its middle school. The newest award will support more planning as the school develops at 16th and West Norris Streets, principal Ted Domers said.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
GEORGE WASHINGTON Carver High School of Engineering and Science, one of the city's top magnet schools, has received a $200,000 grant to aid its middle-school expansion in September. Officials said yesterday that the grant, courtesy of the Philadelphia School Partnership, will enable the school to enroll 120 students in grades 7 and 8. Specifically, the school will purchase 120 Google Chromebooks for a one-to-one student-laptop ratio, engineering kits and other materials. The money will also pay for professional development.
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