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Midlife

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NEWS
March 20, 1993 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Somewhere in the middle of Groundhog Day, Bill Murray turns to the man sitting beside him at a bar and says in a voice of utter despair, "What would you do if you were stuck in one place and every day was the same and nothing mattered?" This is the philosophy of life that the rather obnoxious and egocentric weatherman has brought to this delicious time-warp fantasy. Murray has gotten stuck, truly stuck, in Punxsutawney, Pa., where he went to cover the Feb. 2 festivities. For this weatherman, there is literally no tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Male-menopause wisecrackery with heavy-duty Harley-Davidson product placement, Wild Hogs stars Tim Allen, Martin Lawrence, William H. Macy and John Travolta as weekend biker buddies who chuck their dull suburban lives - for a week, anyway - to ride their glistening chrome machines into the sunset. "Did you ever wake up one day and wonder what happened to your life?" wonders Doug (Allen), a Cincinnati dentist with a wife, a kid, and a creeping sense of midlife ennui. Yeah, and did you ever go to a high-concept Hollywood movie and wonder what happened to your 99 minutes?
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Sonya Baker, Special to The Inquirer
The Mother's Day cards inside their registration packets told the story: "Let the record show that midlife and older women are . . . making vital contributions to society. By the year 2000, 22 million women, age 45 and over, will be in the paid workforce. It's time to retire the stereotypes. . . . " The 115 women attending Saturday's Older Women's Conference were focused on just that. The daylong program at Bucks County Community College in Newtown Township addressed issues and concerns of midlife and older women.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1993 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Two movies with ensemble casts and plots about life among the contemporary midlife set top this week's list of new movies on video. INDIAN SUMMER 1/2 (1993) (Touchstone) $94.95. 108 minutes. Alan Arkin, Matt Craven, Sam Raimi, Diane Lane, Julie Warner, Bill Paxton, Elizabeth Perkins, Kevin Pollak, Vincent Spano. Don't believe anyone who tells you Indian Summer is a boomer reunion film in the spirit of The Return of the Secaucus Seven and The Big Chill. This summer-camp reunion film has a much better-looking ensemble cast, but the members don't mourn the loss of their ideals.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Eileen Reinhard, Special to The Inquirer
In the 1970s, the tiny borough of Palmyra, at the edge of the Delaware River, seemed to be in a midlife slump. The borough had blossomed at the turn of the century when the Camden and Amboy Railroad brought a boom of people and business and the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge was opened in 1929. By the 1970s, the tracks still carried freight trains alongside Palmyra's main street, but the boom seemed to have run out of steam. Not many new businesses opened, not many houses were being built, and not many of the schools' sports teams were getting the big wins that used to make Palmyra proud.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Cecilia Roth, the sage, sexy star of Pedro Almod?var's gem All About My Mother, is the best reason - the only reason - to see Luc?a, Luc?a. A forced, freewheeling mystery-comedy about a Mexico City wife in the throes of a midlife crisis, the pic is clunky and unsurprising. In the title role (or half the title role, to be precise), Roth is a children's book writer drawn into a complicated kidnapping caper when her husband disappears at the airport one day. An elderly but endlessly energetic former Castro compatriot, F?lix (Carlos ?lvarez Novoa)
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | By Pauline Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Until recently, midlife and menopausal women were either ignored or lumped in with everyone else in the gynecological community. "These women never had a forum to air their medical complaints, because OB-GYNs (doctors specializing in obstetrics and gynecology) are usually caring for pregnant women or . . . (helping women get) pregnant or it's a yearly check-up," said Dr. Judith Albert, head of the Center of Women's Health at the University of Pennsylvania. "The yearly checkup has always been 'quick, get your pap smear done and, hopefully, don't complain so you don't take up any time,' " she said.
NEWS
October 13, 2005 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eve Ensler, the midwife of The Vagina Monologues, has moved upward - to her belly. "Who would think a radical feminist for 30 years could spend this much time thinking about my stomach?" she asks in The Good Body, her expiation on midlife midriff, and then proceeds to do just that, for 90 minutes. The one-woman show, at the Annenberg Center through Sunday, is meant to explore women's troubled feelings about their bodies. Just as she helped women utter the word vagina over and over again in so many languages, the entertainer-activist is here to aid us in conquering our pervasive fear of spread and gravity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It was in many ways another joyous annual reunion. The Raiders, a group of childhood pals who had reunited in midlife, had come to a sprawling house in Ocean City for a long, Big Chill kind of weekend together. There were the usual laughter, teasing, and remembering the good old Camden days of their childhoods. But there was another agenda: Michael Morris, one of their own, a popular South Jersey salesman, had died two months before. His widow was keeping her promise to him that his ashes would be spread in the Atlantic off Ocean City - the site of Raider reunions - with family and the Raiders attending for a last goodbye.
NEWS
March 17, 2008 | By Dan Gottlieb
Marge was 48 years old when she came to my office last year complaining of depression. She said her marriage was "comfortable, but without passion. " Her teenage children were doing well, but she was worried about paying tuition when the time came. Her work life had been stable for 15 years. And then she woke up one day and realized that, at her age, many of her professional dreams would never come true. And she would probably be spending the rest of her life in her merely "comfortable" marriage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2016 | By Steven Rea, MOVIE CRITIC
NOTE: A version of this review appeared in the Oct. 22, 2015, issue of The Inquirer, when "Anomalisa" premiered as the opening-night selection of the Philadelphia Film Festival. The singular and stunning Anomalisa - brainchild of Charlie Kaufman, in cahoots with animation director Duke Johnson - begins with a pitch-dark screen and a cacophony of voices: aural detritus, everyday yak. Then, a sun-burnished cloudscape appears, a jet slices through the cumulus, we're inside the plane, and the passengers are all . . . puppets.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Princeton University's Angus Deaton won the Nobel Prize for economics by bringing his ivory-tower profession down to earth and into homes where people are uplifted - or punished - by social, industrial, trade, and tax policies. The Scotland-born Deaton, 69, earned his degrees at Britain's elite Cambridge University back when it gave students few mandatory courses and lots of discretion to pursue their interests, he told an applauding crowd Monday at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of International and Public Affairs hours after learning he had won the prize from the Sweden-based Nobel selection committee that included a Princeton colleague.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE CUSP-OF-THIRTY man holding on to his adolescence like Peter Pan is a staple of dude comedy-"Laggies" wonders if there's room for women in Neverland. The film stars Keira Knightley as Megan, a twentysomething working part-time for her dad (Jeff Garlin), going to bachelorette parties and watching her last single friend (Ellie Kemper) get married. Her girlfriends joke about being domesticated, and Megan is the odd woman out. When her longtime boyfriend (Mark Webber) gets ready to propose and her parents' own marriage is suddenly looking rocky, Megan goes out for the proverbial pack of smokes and doesn't come back - at a convenience store she buys wine coolers for some local teens, skateboards with them, and ends up bunking with high school sophomore Annika (Chloe Grace Moretz)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
If you want to appreciate a work of art, your attitude matters. Personally, I dislike romantic comedies, unless tempered with a darker subplot or an element of fantasy, or when carried off with panache. So I didn't expect to enjoy Midsummer (a play with songs) , a 2009 Scottish romcom by David Greig and Gordon McIntyre. I didn't know that Inis Nua's sly, fantastical production at the Off-Broad Street Theater would transform the genre. Midsummer opens on romcom staple number one: an unlikely pair of lovers, 35-year old childless divorce lawyer Helena (an utterly delightful Liz Filios)
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Twenty years ago, sitting in a suburban movie theater watching Steven Spielberg's film Schindler's List , I had an awakening. The kind that ignites nerve endings. I knew that Jews, my people by birth and heritage, had been systematically killed by the Nazis simply because they were Jewish. But there was so much I didn't know. Certainly, one missing piece was Oskar Schindler, originally a war profiteer and member of the Nazi Party who ultimately turned hero, trying desperately to put a proverbial finger in the dike by hiring Jews to work in his factories.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It was in many ways another joyous annual reunion. The Raiders, a group of childhood pals who had reunited in midlife, had come to a sprawling house in Ocean City for a long, Big Chill kind of weekend together. There were the usual laughter, teasing, and remembering the good old Camden days of their childhoods. But there was another agenda: Michael Morris, one of their own, a popular South Jersey salesman, had died two months before. His widow was keeping her promise to him that his ashes would be spread in the Atlantic off Ocean City - the site of Raider reunions - with family and the Raiders attending for a last goodbye.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The suicide rate among middle-aged Americans climbed a startling 28 percent in a decade, a period that included the recession and the mortgage crisis, the government reported Thursday. The trend was most pronounced among white men and women in that age group. Their suicide rate jumped 40 percent between 1999 and 2010. The rates in younger and older people held steady. And there was little change among middle-aged blacks, Hispanics, and most other racial and ethnic groups, the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.
NEWS
November 20, 2012
NEW YORK - A New York City police officer has pleaded not guilty to charges that he plotted to abduct and cook women so he could eat their body parts. Gilberto Valle entered the plea Monday in federal court in Manhattan. Authorities arrested the 28-year-old NYPD officer last month based on a tip from his estranged wife. The FBI says it uncovered emails from Valle to an unidentified co-conspirator "discussing plans to kidnap, rape, torture, kill, cook and eat body parts of a number of women.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Composer Kile Smith seems always to have been here - one reason, perhaps, why nobody saw his midlife creative breakthrough coming. As curator of the huge musical lending library that is the Fleisher Collection, he held forth at the Free Library of Philadelphia's main branch for three decades, helping the likes of Charles Dutoit find obscure French repertoire and sending music on loan all over the world. His compositions turned up on contemporary-music concert programs, but not always high-profile ones.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Tom Hanks looks darn good for 55. He also looks darn good for Tom Hanks. Slimmer than in recent years. Sunnier than Robert Langdon, the oddly coiffed symbologist/sleuth he played in The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons. Sharper-dressed, too, in a midnight-blue blazer, black shirt, and Levi's. And why not? In Larry Crowne, which opened Friday, Hanks plays the guy who first loses his job and then his house, enrolls in community college, gets a makeover from the second-cutest female on campus, and dates the cutest one, a speech teacher played by Julia Roberts.
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