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Midnight Oil

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NEWS
May 26, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Too often in rock and roll, the brute force of the guitar/bass/drums instrumentation substitutes for genuine energy. The rock highway is littered with bands intoxicated by this leveling power; latter-day U2, for example, has more than once allowed its melodies - and message - to be overrun by raw, rather mindless muscle-flexing. The five-piece Australian band Midnight Oil can match such big-sound bands decibel for decibel, and like them, can rouse powerful emotions with a simple change of chord.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
"River Runs Red," one of 10 songs from Blue Sky Mining, the album to be released today by Australian rockers Midnight Oil, uses operatic techniques to scold big business for abusing the environment. The song begins softly, with lead singer Peter Garrett addressing the perpetrators directly in an accusatory recitative. It builds to a formidable final verse, in which Garrett reaches the conclusion, "It must be the curse of the age; what's taken is never renewed," an observation reinforced by images of environmental decay - rivers running red and sooty black rain.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The chairs in the penthouse suite of the Roger Smith Hotel are arranged in a loose circle. Eight acoustic guitars lean against the walls, solemn functionaries waiting to serve. A snare drum sits in a corner, next to a mandolin. The table holds a room-service tray and a lone keyboard. Midnight Oil is using the room to rehearse for a future appearance on MTV Unplugged. Members of the Australian band known for its frenetic, large-scale assault are milling around. A practice is scheduled later in the day, but no major overhaul is planned for the Unplugged gig, which has become known in the industry as a potential career-maker (or, as often, re-maker)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
"We carry in our heart the true country," sings Peter Garrett in Midnight Oil's song "The Dead Heart," "and that cannot be stolen. We follow in the steps of our ancestry, and that cannot be broken. " Midnight Oil plays the Tower Theater tomorrow night, but the band will be carrying more of its native land than the stuffed animals, oil drums and barbed wire that decorate its stage set. "The Dead Heart," like much of Midnight Oil's fiery Diesel and Dust album, concerns the exploitation of Australia's aboriginal population.
NEWS
March 4, 1986
I reply to Craig Stock's column regarding the Phillies loss of attendance. The owners are blaming the team's performance. My husband and I have been Phillies fans back to the Baker Bowl and season ticket holders for many years. We love the Phillies and have rooted for them even when they finished last. We're disgusted with what management has done to this team. The latest brainstorm, getting rid of Ozzie Virgil, and then burning the midnight oil to replace him. They've really made some "brilliant" trades since they purchased the team.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1993 | By Mark Marymont, FOR THE INQUIRER
Politically correct Australian rockers, an infectious reggae band from Jamaica and an airy pop-rock group from Ireland vied for attention Thursday at the Mann Music Center. The headliners, Midnight Oil, angry as ever and full of fierce energy, were clearly the stars, but two youthful bands, Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers and Hothouse Flowers, more than held their own. Singing - sometimes ranting - about humans' propensity for ruining their environment and about TV and other perceived social ills, Midnight Oil frontman Peter Garrett tore through a 85-minute set. Lean and lanky, constantly in motion, doing strange little dances, his bald pate glowing, Garrett performed with an almost frightening intensity.
SPORTS
July 21, 2007 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
William Thomas, six years past his NFL playing days, will join the coaching staff at La Salle University. Thomas, a two-time Pro Bowl linebacker, spent 10 years in the NFL with the Eagles and Oakland Raiders, recording 37 sacks and 27 interceptions. He retired after the 2001 season. "William wanted to get into coaching and we had an opportunity, so it worked out well for him to begin his coaching career [here] and for us to have a guy with his experience and knowledge," Explorers coach Tim Miller said yesterday.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
To most rock and rollers, the expression "Oz Rock" used to evoke the image of Ozzy Osbourne, metal-head maniac of Black Sabbath infamy. Nowadays, Oz Rock represents a veritable flood of pop acts from Australia - from the multi-platinum pop funk knockouts INXS (pronounced in excess) and riveting protest rockers Midnight Oil, to offbeat phenomena such as the percussion-powered Big Pig, horn-bedecked Hunters and Collectors and the spacey yet guitar-gutsy band The Church. The latest arrival from the land down under is The Screaming Tribesmen, debuting locally at the Chestnut Cabaret tomorrow.
NEWS
June 1, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
"Beatlemania" bug bite you? Just can't get enough of that "yeah, yeah, yeah?" To honor the release of "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" on compact disc - and the presentation tonight of "Come Together," a musical program which recreates the group in its heyday, at the Trocadero, 10th and Arch, - a foraging of record stores carrying the music of the Fab Four is in order. Today marks the 20th anniversary of the original release of the Sgt. Pepper album. With songs like "Eleanor Rigby" and "With A Little Help From My Friends," the record was as much social commentary as good music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Incredible Casuals' That's That (Rounder ) is an uncommonly smart debut album by a trio of musicians capable of playing just about any style of rock. They are as comfortable with raucous, punk-influenced rock as they are with more mannerly melodies. They play "Discretion" with discretion - understatement in the service of passion is a neat trick with this group - and "I Got to Move" deserves to become a rock-and-roll anthem. Megadeath So Far, So Good . . . So What! (Enigma/Capitol )
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
AS COUNTERINTUITIVE as it may sound, getting inadequate sleep may be making you fat. If you've been skimping on sleep, burning the midnight oil or, worse, burning both ends of the candle, you are likely doing yourself a huge disservice. I know all too well the havoc that lack of sleep can have on your waistline and your health. Many years ago, I worked the third shift at a bank, from midnight to 8 in the morning. Working this type of schedule is just not natural, and consequently, in an effort to stay alert, it drove me to consume copious cups of coffee and snack, snack, snack.
NEWS
July 9, 2008
The latest state budget deal in Harrisburg was a defeat for open government. Many Pennsylvanians probably weren't paying attention to the last-minute budget negotiations, which culminated on the Fourth of July. And that's exactly what legislative leaders wanted. To recap: Gov. Rendell submitted his 2008-09 budget in February. The legislature procrastinated for several months, as usual. As the June 30 budget deadline approached, Republican legislators and Rendell spent as much energy shadow-boxing about whether it was legal to furlough state employees in the absence of a budget as they did trying to agree on an actual budget.
SPORTS
July 21, 2007 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
William Thomas, six years past his NFL playing days, will join the coaching staff at La Salle University. Thomas, a two-time Pro Bowl linebacker, spent 10 years in the NFL with the Eagles and Oakland Raiders, recording 37 sacks and 27 interceptions. He retired after the 2001 season. "William wanted to get into coaching and we had an opportunity, so it worked out well for him to begin his coaching career [here] and for us to have a guy with his experience and knowledge," Explorers coach Tim Miller said yesterday.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | By Will Van Sant, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Members of the Chesilhurst Concerned Citizens Association are spending their Friday nights plotting strategy for a special election that the New Jersey Supreme Court has ordered for Sept. 19. The gatherings, usually in the kitchen of mayoral challenger Kati Gray-Sadler, sometimes go past midnight. The activity follows a controversial election in November that brought the issue of voting procedures for write-in candidates before the Supreme Court. Gray-Sadler, running as an independent, received 146 votes and Democratic incumbent Arland Poindexter 164. Election officials, however, rejected 23 additional write-in votes for Gray-Sadler because they had not been written on the appropriate line.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1993 | By Mark Marymont, FOR THE INQUIRER
Politically correct Australian rockers, an infectious reggae band from Jamaica and an airy pop-rock group from Ireland vied for attention Thursday at the Mann Music Center. The headliners, Midnight Oil, angry as ever and full of fierce energy, were clearly the stars, but two youthful bands, Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers and Hothouse Flowers, more than held their own. Singing - sometimes ranting - about humans' propensity for ruining their environment and about TV and other perceived social ills, Midnight Oil frontman Peter Garrett tore through a 85-minute set. Lean and lanky, constantly in motion, doing strange little dances, his bald pate glowing, Garrett performed with an almost frightening intensity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The chairs in the penthouse suite of the Roger Smith Hotel are arranged in a loose circle. Eight acoustic guitars lean against the walls, solemn functionaries waiting to serve. A snare drum sits in a corner, next to a mandolin. The table holds a room-service tray and a lone keyboard. Midnight Oil is using the room to rehearse for a future appearance on MTV Unplugged. Members of the Australian band known for its frenetic, large-scale assault are milling around. A practice is scheduled later in the day, but no major overhaul is planned for the Unplugged gig, which has become known in the industry as a potential career-maker (or, as often, re-maker)
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
When the public library is closed and the fate of a term paper hangs on knowing the three brothers' names in The Brothers Karamazov, fret not. There is help available. It's called New Jersey Nightline. A federally financed project, Nightline takes calls - toll-free - from people all over the state who couldn't make it to the library during regular hours. "We are open when everything else is closed," said Nightline project manager Cheryl McBride, who supervises the service, based at the East Brunswick Public Library in Middlesex County.
SPORTS
May 18, 1991 | by Jennifer Frey, Daily News Sports Writer
It could have been very simple. There was this point, in the bottom of the ninth inning - around, say, 10:15 or so - when the Phillies had bases loaded and one out. The score was 0-0 and people were packing up their belongings and gathering their kids and getting ready to go home. The fans could have been home in time for the 11 o'clock news; the players in time for Carson (or Arsenio, depending on their taste). Hah. With one swing of the bat, Charlie Hayes turned goat rather than hero and the marathon had begun.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Too often in rock and roll, the brute force of the guitar/bass/drums instrumentation substitutes for genuine energy. The rock highway is littered with bands intoxicated by this leveling power; latter-day U2, for example, has more than once allowed its melodies - and message - to be overrun by raw, rather mindless muscle-flexing. The five-piece Australian band Midnight Oil can match such big-sound bands decibel for decibel, and like them, can rouse powerful emotions with a simple change of chord.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
When Peter Garrett talks about the environment, he doesn't sound like the typically pious rock star, up in arms over those who would dare thwart his latest cause. His voice is filled with the sound of compromise, the acknowledgment of opposing interests, the reasoned responses of a politician. The lead singer of Australia's Midnight Oil, appearing Friday at the Spectrum's Showcase Theater, advocates basic changes in the way we view the environment. Trained as a lawyer, he knows he will not achieve his sometimes radical goals merely through the well-chosen words of a rock-and-roll song.
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