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Midterm Elections

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NEWS
November 14, 2006
ASHORT WHILE ago, Dan Gross endorsed Bob Casey over Rick Santorum in his column. He said that Casey was "dreadful" (I think that was the word), but that Santorum was "more dreadful. " I have this silly notion that a vote for someone is approval. I'm not saying you have to agree with any candidate about all issues. But, if you don't have the time, energy or inclination to do something about it yourself, maybe not participating is as clear a message to your party as you can make.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
So little time, so much to do. That daunting refrain will haunt Congress this session, an election year, as members return for an abbreviated replay of many of the same issues they were unable to resolve last session. Just a glance at the agenda - from the continuing struggle over the federal role in education to how much to spend on highways - should give even the most optimistic lawmaker reason to pause. Officially, the second session of the 105th Congress will convene today, as constitutionally prescribed.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
EVERYONE seems to agree that the Democratic Party will be a big loser in the 2010 midterm elections. But there's a lot of time between now and then. I seem to recall that in the year before the last presidential election, the "experts" were debating whether Hillary could beat Rudy, and we all know how that one turned out. A lot can happen between now and November, but if the voters really feel that the behavior of congressional Republicans this past year merits swelling their ranks, then so be it. We get the kind of government we choose.
NEWS
August 29, 2006
RE DICK CHENEY's recent comments to those who voted against Joe Lieberman: "Enough!" Stop the fear-mongering and respect the process as well as the voters. Are Cheney & Co. so desperate to remain in power that any vote against them and their allies is just short of treason? The panic shown by this administration as their lies are exposed would be funny if not for the soldiers dying from them. As soon as the voters and Congress wake up from their four-year nap and realize it is power, not patriotism, that the administration and their pals are most concerned with, we can get on with cleaning up the mess George W. Bush has left behind.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | BY LOU CANNON
It seems like only yesterday that Republicans were talking about a brave new political realignment in which they would compete with the Democrats on even footing. Now they are worrying if they can hang on to the supposedly secure Republican House district in Wyoming. Republicans have already lost special elections for House seats in Indiana and Alabama. In the Wyoming election Wednesday to fill the vacancy created when Dick Cheney became secretary of defense, Democrat John Vinich is making an inspired run in a strongly pro-Republican statewide district.
NEWS
October 30, 2010 | By QUEEN MUSE, museq@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Aurelia Robbins, 42, said she's already riled up ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections. The South Philadelphia resident strutted home from one of several rallies hosted in her neighborhood this month, "Onorato for Governor" sign in hand, optimistic about her candidate's chance, even though he's trailed his GOP opponent, Attorney General Tom Corbett, in the polls all fall, including by double digits this week. "If they keep doing what they're doing in the black neighborhoods, these people are going to support them at the polls," Robbins said.
NEWS
September 9, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President Obama plans to hit the road for a series of campaign rallies beginning later this month to mobilize dispirited Democrats to vote in the Nov. 2 midterm elections, party officials said Thursday. The president is scheduled to visit Philadelphia on Oct. 10 on the tour, which begins Sept. 28 and will also include stops in the critical states of Wisconsin, Ohio and Nevada. Obama also plans a "tele-town hall" on Oct 12 to ask supporters at events across the country and over the Internet to commit to vote.
NEWS
July 18, 2010 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the political wind behind Republicans for the moment, mostly because of a weak economy, Old City resident Christiane Geisler handed out Democratic fliers and chatted up Saturday shoppers at the Reading Terminal Market, hoping to hold back a GOP tide in this fall's midterm elections. "I am not complaining. I love to sweat outside," said Geisler, 57, a registered nurse who works in HIV research and an Obama supporter. "We voted in 2008 for change, and we don't want to go backward.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
The GOP has borrowed a page from the Nazis. A Nazi leader in the 1930s stated that in order to get the public to go along with your policies, all you have to do is tell them that they are in danger of being attacked. It worked for the GOP in the 2002 midterm elections and it appears to be working know. On Nov. 2, we can't afford to let fear determine our vote. We must elect leadership that will be held accountable for more than the number of bullets fired in search of Osama & Co. Kendall C. Wood, Philadelphia A woman whose son was killed in Iraq protests against the war at a Laura Bush rally in New Jersey.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
When you look at the Marlboro Man, collar turned up against the chill, dogies trotting beside his working horse, the very picture of American individualism and independence, the word welfare doesn't jump to mind. But cattlemen out West have been eager recipients of a public subsidy for years now - huge discounts on the grazing fees they pay on federally owned land. They pay a tiny fraction of the going rate for munching on private rangelands. In other words, folks, your taxes are giving their cows, if not a free lunch, at least a reduced-price meal.
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NEWS
November 20, 2014 | BY DOYLE McMANUS
  IT'S BEEN almost two weeks since their stinging defeat in midterm elections, but Democrats are still licking their wounds and trying to figure out where they went wrong. They don't have much time to extract the right lessons: The 2016 presidential campaign will begin in earnest any minute now. So, I consulted two Democratic sages, each of whom played a central role in electing the last two Democratic presidents: David Axelrod, who worked for Barack Obama in 2008, and James Carville, who worked for Bill Clinton in 1992.
NEWS
September 9, 2012
Patterns of GOP obstructionism In his acceptance speech at the GOP convention, Mitt Romney said, "But this president cannot tell us that you are better off today than when he took office. " Actually, he can. Because, overall, we are. Not that there isn't a long way to go. But what can't be said is that we are better off today than two years ago. From a steady ascent from the ashes of the aftermath of the previous administration, through the efforts and leadership of the most productive Congress in recent history, things stalled after the midterm elections.
NEWS
April 21, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner accepted a high honor from the Union League on Friday night - and, no, he didn't cry. The often tearful Ohio Republican received the Philadelphia institution's Lincoln Award, presented to people of distinction who, through their actions, have significantly contributed to the United States. He entered and left to a standing ovation from about 180 people, and in between delivered 10 minutes of remarks in which he comically described his early upbringing, criticized federal government spending, and complimented the league for its work in preserving history and expanding patriotism.
NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAMBRIDGE, Md. - President Obama rallied House Democrats for an election-year fight, urging them to work with Republicans if they show some willingness to put politics aside but telling the rank and file to call them out if they stand in the way. Addressing Democrats on the final day of their three-day annual retreat, Obama outlined the political stakes over the next few months as congressional Democrats try to push his agenda in the face of...
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Democrat Manan Trivedi, a Reading physician and an Iraq war veteran, said Monday that he would seek a rematch next year with Republican Rep. Jim Gerlach for Pennsylvania's Sixth District seat. In the 2010 midterm elections, Gerlach beat Trivedi by more than 33,000 votes. Democrats hope that dissatisfaction with congressional Republicans in Washington and the higher turnout levels of a presidential election year will lead to a different result in 2012. "I think there's a lot of buyer's remorse out there," Trivedi, 37, said in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
YESTERDAY'S news was all about Tuesday's midterm elections, but now that the boring stuff is over, let's turn our focus to what really matters on this page: celebrities. The Famous inundated us Joe(anne) Sixpacks with pleas to get out the vote, but Fox News reports that few put their money where their mouths were. Paparazzi were stationed at polling places all over Los Angeles, but the only celebs caught doing their civic duty were soon-to-be former Guv Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jennifer Garner . The hypocritical behavior could easily be chalked up to absentee ballots, but Fox quoted Angie Meyer , communications director of the Young Republicans, who said that many outspoken celebrities aren't even registered.
NEWS
November 3, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Never before in the history of our nation have so many politicians, to say nothing of anonymous special interest groups, spent so much during midterm elections - $4 billion, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics - to preach fiscal conservatism, smaller government, and a return to leaner times. This campaign season was about money, big money and secret money, thanks to the Supreme Court's January decision in the Citizens United case, as well as an angry electorate and candidates offering hollow bromides and unspecific campaign promises.
NEWS
October 30, 2010 | By QUEEN MUSE, museq@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Aurelia Robbins, 42, said she's already riled up ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections. The South Philadelphia resident strutted home from one of several rallies hosted in her neighborhood this month, "Onorato for Governor" sign in hand, optimistic about her candidate's chance, even though he's trailed his GOP opponent, Attorney General Tom Corbett, in the polls all fall, including by double digits this week. "If they keep doing what they're doing in the black neighborhoods, these people are going to support them at the polls," Robbins said.
NEWS
October 11, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writers
President Obama urged thousands of people at a rally in Philadelphia's Germantown neighborhood Sunday to look past their frustration with "the pace of change" and turn out Nov. 2 to vote for Democrats in the midterm elections to keep progress alive. "The other side has decided to ride that anger and frustration without offering solutions," Obama said. "Pundits in Washington say it's a smart strategy. I think the pundits are wrong. You care too much about this country to let it fall backwards.
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