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Miguel Estrada

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NEWS
September 8, 2003 | By Christine Flowers
On Thursday, Miguel Estrada, President Bush's choice to fill a vacancy on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, requested that his nomination be withdrawn from consideration. In yet another example of politics trumping merit, the Democrats in the Senate blocked the nomination, refusing to allow a final vote until the Justice Department released internal memos Estrada had written while serving in the office of the solicitor general during the first Bush administration.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | By Frank Davies INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To the Bush administration, Miguel Estrada's nomination for a top federal judgeship is a brilliant opportunity. It combines impressive legal credentials, an immigrant success story, and a chance to woo Hispanic voters. Critics, however, view Estrada, a Honduran American who lacks judicial experience, as a Justice Clarence Thomas in the making, a young lawyer thrust toward the Supreme Court as a conservative ideologue no more representative of Hispanics than Thomas was of blacks.
NEWS
March 7, 2003 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Democrats yesterday blocked a vote on Miguel Estrada, a conservative Hispanic lawyer whose nomination to a federal appeals court has become a test of President Bush's ability to put his imprint on the federal judiciary. The showdown was a tactical defeat for Bush, his first in the new Republican-controlled Senate, but Estrada's nomination to the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia remains alive. Republicans vowed to bring the nomination up for a vote again, possibly next week.
NEWS
February 14, 2003 | By Philip Terzian
Miguel Estrada is a lawyer who has traveled some distance in his 42 years. Born in Honduras, he came to the United States with his family when he was a teenager. After Columbia University, he went to Harvard Law School, where he was editor of the Law Review and graduated magna cum laude. He was clerk to a federal judge and to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, and then an assistant U.S. attorney in New York. In the early 1990s, he was an assistant solicitor general, arguing for the federal government in jury trials and before the Second Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals.
NEWS
March 1, 2003
If Hollywood ever makes a movie about the Senate melodrama over federal court nominee Miguel Estrada, the filmmakers can call it Mr. Seinfeld Goes to Washington. The sitcom star who's all about nothing is well suited to portray a Senate minority leader who's leading a filibuster about . . . nothing? Tom Daschle and the Democrats say that Estrada, nominated for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, is a "stealth candidate," an under-the-radar conservative whom President Bush is trying to sneak through the confirmation process without the normal vetting.
NEWS
January 8, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Reopening a partisan fight on the first day of the new Congress, President Bush yesterday resubmitted 31 judicial nominations that had stalled in the Democratic-controlled Senate last year. The move signaled Bush's determination to make the most of the new Republican Senate majority and revived a racially charged debate over Judge Charles Pickering of Mississippi, a candidate for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Liberal critics had contended that Pickering's attitudes on race are suspect.
NEWS
September 26, 2002 | By Linda Chavez
Miguel Estrada has been held hostage for more than 500 days, but you've probably never heard his story. Just who is Miguel Estrada, and what nefarious forces have kept him under wraps for more than a year? Estrada is President Bush's nominee to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, the most important federal circuit in the country. President Bush nominated Estrada on May 9, 2001; but until this week, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.) has held Estrada's nomination hostage.
NEWS
November 14, 2003 | By Jim Puzzanghera INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the Senate extended its marathon debate on stalled judicial nominations, President Bush gathered three controversial nominees in the Oval Office and vowed to stick with them "to the bitter end. " "These three women are being denied a chance to serve on the bench because of ugly politics in the United States Senate," Bush said yesterday, flanked by federal Appeals Court nominees Janice Rogers Brown and Carolyn Kuhl of California and Priscilla Owen...
NEWS
August 1, 2003 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Republicans failed again yesterday to break a Democratic filibuster against a judicial nominee for a federal appeals court. This time, the nominee was Alabama Attorney General William H. Pryor. Democrats are blocking several of President Bush's judicial nominees, and Republicans have failed three times in less than a week to break their obstruction. Pryor opposes abortion, including in cases of rape or incest, and espouses many strict conservative views. Democrats also say they want to delay a decision on his nomination until they have time to investigate his fund-raising for a group of Republican state attorneys general.
NEWS
November 22, 2003 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
LAST WEEK, Senate Democrats blocked three women who were nominated to the federal bench by President Bush. This came immediately after the conclusion of 40 hours of debate in which the Republicans complained about the rejection of the president's judicial candidates. Ted Kennedy said his party would "continue to resist any Neanderthal that is nominated by this president," an interesting word choice from a guy who let a woman drown, and a statement that lets you know just how out of control the judicial nomination process has become.
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NEWS
October 28, 2011
AS ICONIC 60-Minute Man Chuck Bednarik would say, the guy who knows what's on the other side of the field has a distinct advantage over the guy who stays in his own zone. It helps you to neutralize or - as in the case of Frank Gifford - horizontal-ize the enemy. It's the same with politics; putting yourself in the opposition's shoes is a masterful strategy, one that the great Vince Lombardi would have cheered. And I have to say that last week the game ball went to the liberals, who displayed an amazing ability to call out and criticize the most radical, dangerous members of their squad.
NEWS
July 17, 2009 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
ONE person's Great American Success Story is another's irrelevant footnote. All depends on who's telling the tale. Example: Child of Latino immigrants overcomes adversity, works hard, makes it to the Ivy League, then the law review and rises to the highest echelons of the legal profession. Child-turned-accomplished adult gets tapped for a prestigious federal judgeship. And Democrats wage a bitter battle against the nomination, up to and including the rarely used filibuster.
NEWS
July 16, 2009
MAYBE NOT EVERY "wise Latina woman" would make her opponents look out of touch and not all that bright, but Judge Sonia Sotomayor surely has. In the process, Sotomayor has demonstrated - better, frankly, than she expressed it verbally in the past - just why the U.S. Supreme Court needs more justices who are not white males. We are referring, of course, to Republican senators' fixation on Sotomayor's comment that "a wise Latina woman . . . would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male . . . " In the context of a speech in which she made the comment, her meaning was clear: Some of the white males who have dominated the judiciary for centuries have been capable of seeing the perspectives of minorities, but it takes time and effort that some simply can't muster.
NEWS
May 8, 2005
Let the Senate vote Re: "The Filibuster Rule/Don't drop the bomb," editorial, April 24: Republicans in the U.S. Senate have never denied a vote by filibuster to any judicial nominee. Up until 2001, no judicial nominee, Democrat or Republican, who had the necessary votes for confirmation was ever denied a vote by the full Senate. Filibustering to permit more time for debate is one thing, as has been done for many years. (President Lyndon Johnson's nominee for chief justice of the Supreme Court, Abe Fortas, was the subject of such a filibuster, led by then-Sen.
NEWS
February 25, 2005 | By Ruth Marcus
President Bush would be wise to "pick up the phone" and consult with Democrats before choosing a new Supreme Court justice. "The advice clause in the Constitution has been largely ignored. " If there is a vacancy on the high court, "the far right is going to come hard at a nominee if it is not a nominee of their choosing. But I think there's a much broader base in America than the far right. " Changing the Senate rules to prohibit filibusters of judicial nominees - the "nuclear option" - could have deleterious short-term effects and run the long-term risk of eroding the rights of the minority.
NEWS
January 26, 2004 | By Charles Krauthammer
I am bereft. I yield to no one - not a single orange-cap-wearing, twentysomething vegan Deaniac - in my disappointment over Howard Dean's Iowa debacle. Sure, he was their hope. But he was mine, too. Dean as Democratic nominee promised not just happiness, but glory: a Republican landslide of biblical proportions. Big majority in the House. And so many coattailled new senators that Bush could have begun repopulating the Supreme Court with 42-year-old conservatives (like Miguel Estrada)
NEWS
November 22, 2003 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
LAST WEEK, Senate Democrats blocked three women who were nominated to the federal bench by President Bush. This came immediately after the conclusion of 40 hours of debate in which the Republicans complained about the rejection of the president's judicial candidates. Ted Kennedy said his party would "continue to resist any Neanderthal that is nominated by this president," an interesting word choice from a guy who let a woman drown, and a statement that lets you know just how out of control the judicial nomination process has become.
NEWS
November 14, 2003 | By Jim Puzzanghera INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the Senate extended its marathon debate on stalled judicial nominations, President Bush gathered three controversial nominees in the Oval Office and vowed to stick with them "to the bitter end. " "These three women are being denied a chance to serve on the bench because of ugly politics in the United States Senate," Bush said yesterday, flanked by federal Appeals Court nominees Janice Rogers Brown and Carolyn Kuhl of California and Priscilla Owen...
NEWS
November 12, 2003 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Get your tickets to the U.S. Senate! A 30-hour marathon debate starts today and will go straight through to Friday. Republicans have orchestrated the "talkathon" to highlight Democratic efforts to block the confirmation of some of President Bush's judicial nominees. No one expects to resolve the fight, but that won't stop lawmakers from keeping bleary-eyed Senate staff, stenographers, librarians, pages, cooks and police officers on a round-the-clock vigil. Senators on both sides of the aisle intend to add another chapter to the chamber's history.
NEWS
October 31, 2003 | By CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
LAST WEEK, I spent an evening glued to the TV, watching the Senate confirmation hearings of Justice Janice Rogers Brown. Brown is a judge on the California Supreme Court, nominated by President Bush to fill a vacancy on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Like a number of the nominees proposed by the administration, she is highly qualified, a minority and conservative. In many ways, she is the female version of Miguel Estrada, who withdrew his nomination in the wake of a partisan filibuster led by that champion of diversity, Charles Schumer.
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