CollectionsMike Helton
IN THE NEWS

Mike Helton

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
July 21, 2000 | By Pete Schnatz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Two of stock-car racing's most prominent figures, Mike Helton and Dale Earnhardt Jr., made a pit stop in town yesterday. And it wasn't a simple splash-and-go en route to Pocono Raceway for Sunday's Pennsylvania 500. Helton, NASCAR's chief operating officer, addressed more than 250 movers and shakers during a Philadelphia Business Journal breakfast at Hotel Sofitel in Center City. The discussion touched on a number of financial issues, including NASCAR's soaring revenues through merchandising and a new television deal that should boost the sport's growth overseas.
SPORTS
November 29, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
For the first time, NASCAR has a president whose last name is not France. Mike Helton, 47, who has served as senior vice president and chief operating officer of the sanctioning body for the past two years, was named president yesterday by Bill France Jr. France, 67, had been president since 1972, when he assumed the role from his father, William H.G. France, who had been president since the organization was formed in 1948. France Jr. is recovering from cancer and has had other health problems.
SPORTS
July 1, 1999 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Spiraling costs in Winston Cup racing have many people in NASCAR concerned. While the series is booming, it is estimated the price of sponsoring a Winston Cup team has doubled in the last five years. It now costs $8 to $10 million a year to run a top Cup team. For their big bucks, most sponsors want a driver that runs up front. Rising costs are high on the agenda of Mike Helton. Earlier this year, NASCAR president Bill France Jr. transferred the day-to-day duties of running the organization to Helton, NASCAR's chief operating officer and senior vice president.
SPORTS
June 6, 2004 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
Surrounded by a sea of outstretched microphones, Mike Helton leaned back in his upholstered chair, appearing cool and comfortable while conducting an informal press gathering. Looking past an inquisitor, the NASCAR president could see a pack of brightly colored stock cars heading straight for him - thundering down the 1,076-foot backstretch at over 160 m.p.h. From his perch 29 feet above the track, the unblinking Helton smiled and called it a "unique" experience as the muffled roars of the Ford, Chevy and Dodge engines rumbled beneath his feet.
SPORTS
August 30, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
NASCAR chairman Bill France Jr. was recovering yesterday from bypass surgery that doctors recommended after he fell and broke his hip earlier this week. France, 69, was headed to dinner with a friend Tuesday evening when he fell and broke his right hip, NASCAR said in a statement. While being treated for the injury at a Daytona Beach, Fla., hospital, doctors recommended bypass surgery, which he had on Wednesday. "I have spoken to my brother and he is alert and in good spirits," said James France, president of International Speedway Corporation.
SPORTS
February 11, 1999 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
The start of this racing season is one that Bobby Gerhart always will remember. Gerhart won his first Automobile Racing Club of America event in his 113th career start, and he did it at Daytona International Speedway, on ESPN. Talk about winning in style . . . Gerhart was too busy leading the race to the finish line to get misty-eyed and think about all the frustrations he had endured. "There weren't a lot of dry eyes around after the race," Gerhart said Tuesday after returning to his Lebanon, Pa., home.
SPORTS
June 9, 2006 | By Pete Schnatz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In its quest to convert new fans and initiate more deep-pocketed corporations into its circle of sponsorship, NASCAR has strategically branched out from its birthplace in Daytona Beach, Fla., in recent years. The stock-car racing sanctioning body now has offices in seven cities across the country, and is considering putting down roots in Mexico and Canada as well. While the NASCAR folks in the Charlotte, N.C., area handle everything from licensing to research and development, the Los Angeles staff pursues deals in the entertainment industry.
SPORTS
July 27, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
There's big business, small business, show business and monkey business. With NASCAR, all of the above apply, except small business. Monkey business involves the ways crews traditionally try to bend the rules. Anyone leaving a race weekend at a place like Pocono Raceway is struck again by the jackpot. With crawling exit traffic, fans have plenty of time to think about NASCAR. More than 100,000 attended last Sunday's Pennsylvania 500 Winston Cup race. The mind boggles at how much money is taken in by hotels, restaurants and in souvenir sales.
SPORTS
October 5, 1999 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Gentlemen, start your uppercuts. Perhaps overlooked in Jeff Gordon's dramatic victory Sunday in Martinsville, Va., was Tony Stewart's temper tantrum. Stewart and Kenny Irwin renewed their open-wheel rivalry with some major league bumping. After Stewart's car was tapped by Irwin and spun out on lap 147 of the NAPA AutoCare 500, an angry Stewart climbed out of his Pontiac and waited for Irwin to drive by under the caution flag. Drivers often stand on the track, waiting for the rival they believe has mistreated them.
SPORTS
June 5, 2007 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN For the Daily News
He was one of the most powerful people in sports. Team owners in NASCAR half-kiddingly said that Bill France Jr. ran a "benevolent dictatorship. " If you wanted to race in NASCAR, you did business France's way, or hit the highway. Inheriting the leadership of NASCAR from his equally influential father of the same same in 1972, Bill France Jr. shaped the stock car-racing organization from a regional Southern sport into a billion-dollar industry. Bill Jr. died yesterday at age 74 at his Daytona Beach, Fla., home.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 22, 2013 | By Bill Fleischman, fleiscb@phillynews.com
AFTER DANICA Patrick won the pole for Sunday's Daytona 500, we could imagine Brian France and Mike Helton pounding their desks and shouting, "Yes! Yes!" In recent years, attendance at NASCAR tracks has slipped and television ratings have declined. Also, the purportedly safer, more efficient Car of Tomorrow produced dull racing. Now, France, NASCAR's chief executive officer, and Helton, the sanctioning body's president, have reasons to be excited about the new season. Having Patrick, the first woman to earn a pole position in a Sprint Cup race, as the fastest Daytona 500 qualifier surely will attract casual fans who are curious to see how she does in the race.
SPORTS
June 5, 2007 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN For the Daily News
He was one of the most powerful people in sports. Team owners in NASCAR half-kiddingly said that Bill France Jr. ran a "benevolent dictatorship. " If you wanted to race in NASCAR, you did business France's way, or hit the highway. Inheriting the leadership of NASCAR from his equally influential father of the same same in 1972, Bill France Jr. shaped the stock car-racing organization from a regional Southern sport into a billion-dollar industry. Bill Jr. died yesterday at age 74 at his Daytona Beach, Fla., home.
SPORTS
June 9, 2006 | By Pete Schnatz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In its quest to convert new fans and initiate more deep-pocketed corporations into its circle of sponsorship, NASCAR has strategically branched out from its birthplace in Daytona Beach, Fla., in recent years. The stock-car racing sanctioning body now has offices in seven cities across the country, and is considering putting down roots in Mexico and Canada as well. While the NASCAR folks in the Charlotte, N.C., area handle everything from licensing to research and development, the Los Angeles staff pursues deals in the entertainment industry.
SPORTS
June 6, 2004 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
Surrounded by a sea of outstretched microphones, Mike Helton leaned back in his upholstered chair, appearing cool and comfortable while conducting an informal press gathering. Looking past an inquisitor, the NASCAR president could see a pack of brightly colored stock cars heading straight for him - thundering down the 1,076-foot backstretch at over 160 m.p.h. From his perch 29 feet above the track, the unblinking Helton smiled and called it a "unique" experience as the muffled roars of the Ford, Chevy and Dodge engines rumbled beneath his feet.
SPORTS
August 30, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
NASCAR chairman Bill France Jr. was recovering yesterday from bypass surgery that doctors recommended after he fell and broke his hip earlier this week. France, 69, was headed to dinner with a friend Tuesday evening when he fell and broke his right hip, NASCAR said in a statement. While being treated for the injury at a Daytona Beach, Fla., hospital, doctors recommended bypass surgery, which he had on Wednesday. "I have spoken to my brother and he is alert and in good spirits," said James France, president of International Speedway Corporation.
SPORTS
December 8, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
In many professional sports, grumbling often follows the selection of a new commissioner or president. Dissenters ask, "Why him? My choice was better. " If the appointee is a surprise selection, others screech, "Who's he?" Mike Helton provoked no such harsh reactions when he was promoted to president of NASCAR last month. Helton succeeds Bill France Jr., who is battling cancer. France, 67, remains board chairman. Since last year, Helton, 45, had been NASCAR's senior vice president and chief operating officer.
SPORTS
November 29, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
For the first time, NASCAR has a president whose last name is not France. Mike Helton, 47, who has served as senior vice president and chief operating officer of the sanctioning body for the past two years, was named president yesterday by Bill France Jr. France, 67, had been president since 1972, when he assumed the role from his father, William H.G. France, who had been president since the organization was formed in 1948. France Jr. is recovering from cancer and has had other health problems.
SPORTS
July 27, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
There's big business, small business, show business and monkey business. With NASCAR, all of the above apply, except small business. Monkey business involves the ways crews traditionally try to bend the rules. Anyone leaving a race weekend at a place like Pocono Raceway is struck again by the jackpot. With crawling exit traffic, fans have plenty of time to think about NASCAR. More than 100,000 attended last Sunday's Pennsylvania 500 Winston Cup race. The mind boggles at how much money is taken in by hotels, restaurants and in souvenir sales.
SPORTS
July 21, 2000 | By Pete Schnatz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Two of stock-car racing's most prominent figures, Mike Helton and Dale Earnhardt Jr., made a pit stop in town yesterday. And it wasn't a simple splash-and-go en route to Pocono Raceway for Sunday's Pennsylvania 500. Helton, NASCAR's chief operating officer, addressed more than 250 movers and shakers during a Philadelphia Business Journal breakfast at Hotel Sofitel in Center City. The discussion touched on a number of financial issues, including NASCAR's soaring revenues through merchandising and a new television deal that should boost the sport's growth overseas.
SPORTS
October 5, 1999 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Gentlemen, start your uppercuts. Perhaps overlooked in Jeff Gordon's dramatic victory Sunday in Martinsville, Va., was Tony Stewart's temper tantrum. Stewart and Kenny Irwin renewed their open-wheel rivalry with some major league bumping. After Stewart's car was tapped by Irwin and spun out on lap 147 of the NAPA AutoCare 500, an angry Stewart climbed out of his Pontiac and waited for Irwin to drive by under the caution flag. Drivers often stand on the track, waiting for the rival they believe has mistreated them.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|