CollectionsMike Wallace
IN THE NEWS

Mike Wallace

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | By Gail Shister, INQUIRER TV COLUMNIST
60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace says he is baffled by the controversy surrounding tonight's planned broadcast of a videotape that shows Dr. Jack Kevorkian administering a lethal dose of drugs to a terminally ill patient. The program airs at 7 on KYW. Kevorkian, the Michigan doctor who has acknowledged helping more than 120 people commit suicide, is shown injecting the drugs into Thomas Youk, 52, who suffered from Lou Gehrig's disease. CBS said viewers will see the moment of his death, which occurred Sept.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For political-scientists-to-be at Swarthmore College, the decision by CBS in November to broadcast Dr. Jack Kevorkian's lethal injection of a Michigan man dying from Lou Gehrig's disease was beyond sensationalism. It was, in academic Marxist parlance, "commodification of suffering. " Mike Wallace, a host of 60 Minutes on CBS, on which the segment aired, laughed off the criticism yesterday as mere ivory-tower rumination. "What mindless crap," Wallace told professor Cynthia Halpern's ethics and public policy class during a visit in which he was honored as the college's first media fellow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1998 | By Frazier Moore, ASSOCIATED PRESS This story contains information from Inquirer wire services
"Winston Churchill called it 'the black dog,' " Mike Wallace began. "Abe Lincoln was so anguished by it, he cried, 'I am now the most miserable man living.' " The 60 Minutes segment on mental depression then turned to present-day sufferers, among them a millionaire industrialist and a prize-winning Broadway producer. Wallace registered amazement at how their success had been gutted by feelings of despair and worthlessness. The piece aired Feb. 25, 1973. "I didn't understand then," says Wallace, who does now all too well.
SPORTS
October 29, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Jeff Burton passed Mike Wallace for the lead with 33 laps to go yesterday to win the Checker Auto Parts 500 for the second consecutive year. Burton crossed the finish line 2.6 seconds - about 30 car-lengths - ahead of Wallace on the flat, 1-mile oval. Burton averaged 102.613 mph in the race slowed by 45 laps of caution. Burton, driving for Roush Racing, picked up his second win of the season and the 17th of his career.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Mike Wallace didn't interview people. He interrogated them. He cross-examined them. Sometimes he eviscerated them. His reputation was so fearsome that it was often said that the scariest words in the English language were, "Mike Wallace is here to see you. " Wallace, whose pitiless, prosecutorial style transformed television journalism and made "60 Minutes" compulsively watchable, died Saturday night at a care facility in...
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | By William F. Buckley Jr
On 60 Minutes last Sunday, a segment was devoted to the preponderance of heavyweight legal power defending the tobacco companies, up against the little old lady left with only a fragment of her lung, who was suing the tobacco companies for a few million dollars. Mike Wallace was the host, and (with characteristic candor) he flashed back to the old days when cigarette smoking was thought to be entirely harmless. He gave the viewers a fragment of a paid ad featuring Ronald Reagan, pushing some cigarette or another, and a second quick flash of Mike Wallace, in the bad old days, merchandising Philip Morris cigarettes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
Stamp collecting, anyone? I hate to say it, but it may be time to develop a hobby, kids. Your TV options are dwindling to slim and none after this week, when many network series used up their last original episodes. Desperate Housewives certainly went out on an odd note. Bree brazenly pimped her son Andrew to entice Walter (J.C. MacKenzie), a gay contractor, to repair her storm-damaged house. It's not even like Walter was a catch: He was described as being a 3 on the hotness scale, plus he was about twice Andrew's age. Yet stepdad Orson was eagerly touting how sexy Andrew looked in his mesh shirt.
NEWS
May 24, 2006 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist It is difficult to imagine who will replace Mike Wallace now that the CBS reporter and 60 Minutes correspondent, 88, is going into retirement. A man like Wallace doesn't just retire. He eases into it, on a tide of interviews about his contributions to journalism, his many coups - conceding a mistake here and there. But for all his bombast, his celebrity, his salty arrogance at times, Mike Wallace has been a major contributor to world journalism.
SPORTS
October 17, 1993 | By Matt Toll, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Washington Township's Mike Koerner rushed for 126 yards and scored four touchdowns to lead the Minutemen to a 35-0 lead over host Overbrook yesterday - by halftime. The Minutemen went on to rout the Rams, 42-0, in an Olympic Conference American Division game in which Washington Township scored on all four of its first-half possessions and on one of Overbrook's - an 18-yard fumble return by Mike Wallace. Koerner ended the afternoon with 151 yards on 14 carries as the Minutemen - ranked No. 1 in South Jersey by The Inquirer - raised their record to 4-0 overall and 2-0 in the division.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY JR
Everybody knows that Vladimir Horowitz was (a) a great musician and (b) a temperamental human being. He was different from his father-in-law Arturo Toscanini (I gather; I did not know Toscanini, though I worshiped him) in that he could be surprisingly affable, even unpredictably so. I met Horowitz under the most unexpected circumstances: on the Eastern Shuttle coming up from Washington 15 years ago. He came over and introduced himself and his wife, smiles lighting up the whole of his volatile countenance.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 27, 2012 | By Ladd Biro, For The Inquirer
Some "no-brainers" are more equal than others.   I advised you last week to bench Mike Wallace, who is normally a must-start player, regardless of the matchup. My reasoning was that he was coming off a bad game with Ben Roethlisberger on the sideline, his backup's backup (Charlie Batch) was in charge, and Cleveland's shutdown corner Joe Haden would be shadowing him everywhere. Sure enough, most of you ignored my advice (not always a crazy idea), and Wallace finished with a single, 9-yard reception on the game's final play.
SPORTS
September 16, 2012 | By Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Staff Writer
It's always good to own Mike Wallace. This week, it's even better. The Steelers' top playmaker will not be making a visit to Revis Island, the place where wide receivers and their fantasy statistics often disappear, because Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis did not make the trip to Pittsburgh. Revis sustained a head injury against the Bills last week and on Friday was left back in New York. "We followed NFL protocol and we'll always follow NFL protocol when it comes to concussions," Jets coach Rex Ryan said.
SPORTS
August 30, 2012 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sure, football players are tough. But if you cut them, will they not cry? The Washington Redskins released their longest-tenured player, tight end Chris "Captain Chaos" Cooley, on Tuesday, and the two-time Pro Bowler got a bit teary while saying goodbye. "I appreciate everything," Cooley said with a sniffle, his voice wobbly. "I'm sorry. I'm a baby. I appreciate everything you guys have done for me. " (Except for, you know, that release thing.) Coach Mike Shanahan said the decision came down to a matter of playing time.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Mike Wallace didn't interview people. He interrogated them. He cross-examined them. Sometimes he eviscerated them. His reputation was so fearsome that it was often said that the scariest words in the English language were, "Mike Wallace is here to see you. " Wallace, whose pitiless, prosecutorial style transformed television journalism and made "60 Minutes" compulsively watchable, died Saturday night at a care facility in...
SPORTS
March 2, 2012
THE EAGLES swear they still love DeSean Jackson, despite receiving production that has declined in the last two seasons, and punt-returning production that has declined in the last three seasons, and the small fact that he sulked on them in the middle of last season, was told not to come to one game after missing a meeting, was benched in the second half of another game, and later felt the need to apologize for his actions. You can decide if they are telling the truth about the love.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2011 | By Dan Gross
DISTRICT ATTORNEY Seth Williams and his wife, Sonita , are divorcing, they said in a joint statement yesterday. The couple said they had arrived at the decision "after long and careful consideration" and would "remain close friends and loving co-parents to our beautiful daughters," ages 24, 12 and 8. "We entered our relationship with love, and it's with love and kindness we leave it. We ask respect for our family's privacy at...
SPORTS
September 9, 2011
Wondering whether or not to start Michael Vick and Jamaal Charles or to bench Luke McCown and Legedu Naanee? The network bozos specialize in that kind of advice. If you're looking for help with real starting lineup conundrums, read on. Here are my picks to roll, and get rolled, in Week 1 of the 2011 season:   Watch 'em roll Matt Stafford, QB, Lions at Buccaneers. Tampa Bay's defense is on the rise, but Detroit is catching it at the right time. Stafford has some dangerous receiving weapons at his disposal, and he should rack up big numbers, especially if he's forced to play from behind.
NEWS
March 22, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 100 years they've come to this emporium for tools, pipe fittings, and miniature screws that won't rust as soon as the salt air hits them. As they cross creaky wooden floors that have been flooded more times than anyone remembers, customers inhale the perfume of nails, grass seed, and burlap and present lists of items needed to build, repair, paint, and clean their homes. And even though long, narrow Wallace Hardware's merchandise is packed tighter than the Jersey Shore on the Fourth of July, members of the family that has operated the place since 1909 can find what their clients are after.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
Stamp collecting, anyone? I hate to say it, but it may be time to develop a hobby, kids. Your TV options are dwindling to slim and none after this week, when many network series used up their last original episodes. Desperate Housewives certainly went out on an odd note. Bree brazenly pimped her son Andrew to entice Walter (J.C. MacKenzie), a gay contractor, to repair her storm-damaged house. It's not even like Walter was a catch: He was described as being a 3 on the hotness scale, plus he was about twice Andrew's age. Yet stepdad Orson was eagerly touting how sexy Andrew looked in his mesh shirt.
SPORTS
February 16, 2007 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael Waltrip woke up yesterday, unsure whether he wanted to climb into his racecar. Hours later, after a news conference, Waltrip raced his No. 55 Toyota Camry around Daytona International Speedway and into the 43-car field for Sunday's Nextel Cup Series season opener. "I'm probably the most depressed guy you've ever seen make the Daytona 500," Waltrip said somberly, still smarting over severe sanctions NASCAR handed down a day earlier against his start-up team. The embattled driver/team owner was joined by Boris Said, Joe Nemechek and Mike Wallace in excelling in yesterday's Gatorade Duel 150-mile qualifying races to lock up berths in the Great American Race.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|