CollectionsMildew
IN THE NEWS

Mildew

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
May 4, 1988 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Our bathroom ceiling looks terrible! It's covered with black splotches of mildew, the paint is peeling and it looks generally disgusting. If I paint, won't the mildew show through? What can I do? - C. Dear C.: First wash the ceiling with a strong bleach solution (half water, half bleach), then let it dry. This will at least partially bleach out the mildew stains and kill the mold spores causing the mildew. Then you can repaint, adding a mildew inhibitor (available at paint stores)
NEWS
July 24, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
South Jersey farmers in the Vineland area spotted the fungus about two weeks ago. Sweet basil plants were yellowing, and brown spores appeared on the underside of the herb's leaves. Though seen on other crops, downy mildew is relatively new to basil in the United States. It wiped out much of the crop on East Coast farms, including those in New Jersey, last summer. The aggressive disease was carried on the wind from the south, and, if it spreads as before, it will again discolor and disfigure the region's crop, reducing availability and likely driving up prices.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
First, Carl and Alice Bigus noticed the mildew creeping up like a disease on the walls of their one-story house. Then, the windows started to swell shut. The back door was hard to close, and the wallpaper peeled off in the bathroom. And there was the odor, which made their entire house smell like a cellar. The source of the Biguses' problem is water seeping into the house. At least two other houses in their Woodbury Gardens development, one of the township's oldest, are experiencing the same symptoms - mildew, wet carpets and peeling paint.
FOOD
April 30, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I have always had trouble with mildew forming on the rubber gaskets around the doors of my refrigerator and freezer. Each week I check and clean them, but the mildew gets ahead of me. Do you have advice for cleaning the stains and for how to keep the mildew from reforming? - Mrs. A.D. Dear Mrs. A.D.: You live in a damp part of the country where mildew is naturally a greater problem than in drier areas. Vigilance is the key to preventing the formation of mildew around those gaskets.
FOOD
November 29, 1989 | By Andy Lang, Special to the Daily News
Q. There is a considerable amount of mildew on the siding at the bottom of one side of our house. The mildew is only on the bottom pieces of wood. What could be causing this, especially that it is only in this one spot? A. Mildew sometimes occurs only at the bottom of a house or where the siding meets the concrete foundation or masonry. Usually it is because part of the house is shaded by shrubbery. When rain takes place, the shrubbery keeps the wood wet, which fosters mildew. The shrubbery also blocks out the sun. Do something about eliminating the shrubbery or, at the very least, trimming it so the sun's rays can get through.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We moved into a home with 20-year-old sliding glass doors that were treated with what appears to be a thin plastic coating or plastic shield for sun glare. Is there any way to remove this coating? One slider has clouded over, and the coating has chipped and blistered in spots. It could be a broken seal, but the areas that have no coating are perfectly clear. Answer: The best solution I've read is from my buddies the Carey Bros. of San Francisco: Spray the coating with ammonia, cover it immediately with Saran Wrap, wait 45 minutes, and then scrape it off with a broad-blade putty knife.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: What are the basics of DryVit care? Our home was built 10 years ago, and we've lived here almost three years. I don't know if it's ever been repainted since installation. Can it be power washed? (It's getting mildew streaks on the shady, damp side of the house.) When it's time to paint, does it require a special product? Answer: The manufacturer recommends that the surface be cleaned every five years. DryVit products include mildew-retarding agents, but mildew can still grow under the proper conditions, especially warm, moist, and shady.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
The beginning of the year is a great time for homeowners to tackle long-put-off projects and prioritize goals. If you give yourself reasonable timetables to accomplish things and you don't take on more than you can handle, you'll find you waste less money and you're less inclined to quit. We won't use the dreaded "R" word, but here is a list of manageable chores to start the year that will make a great difference in your home when done. January Get rid of mildew. You may ask, doesn't mildew grow only in warm weather, outdoors?
LIVING
October 31, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I have a composite deck, light gray in color, and, even though I clean it two times a year with a power washer, there still is this light green mold that appears under the railing and on the steps. Do you have any suggestions for cleaning, and what type of cleaner/detergent do you suggest? Answer: As you surmise, mildew forms where the sun don't shine, even on "maintenance-free" composite decking. Just to clarify: No manufacturer ever claims its products are maintenance-free.
FOOD
July 14, 1993 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: Hope you or one of your "crafty" resources can help me. Years ago I made a white sculpting dough from cornstarch, salt and water. I lost the paper the recipe was on. - F.S. Dear F.S.: We got this "crafty" recipe from the folks at our local day- care center. The best thing about this dough is that, unlike the old- fashioned kind, it doesn't harden. In a saucepan, mix together: 2 cups flour, 2 cups water, 1 cup salt, 2 tablespoons oil, 2 teaspoons cream of tartar.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
October 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
October is National Indoor Air Quality Month, so I thought I would share a few thoughts from Broan Nu-Tone, a manufacturer of home-ventilation products. Of course, it's a good idea to spend the entire year in a clean-air environment. For those with allergies, that's especially true. A member of my family once had a violent reaction to packaging in which some kitchen cabinets arrived. We believe the adverse reaction was chemical-based, so it's good to keep track of those levels.
REAL_ESTATE
October 7, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Above-normal rainfall since early June has yielded a bumper crop of mold and mildew issues, homeowners and professionals tell me. But one of the worst reports comes from Richard A. Heath, worshipful master of the Palestine-Roxborough Masonic Temple. The building is seldom used in summer, and when Heath stopped by in late August, he saw mold on the back wall of the banquet hall. "In the vestibule of our lodge room, this same back wall has photos of our past masters, and many of the mats and photos are covered with mold," he wrote.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We moved into a home with 20-year-old sliding glass doors that were treated with what appears to be a thin plastic coating or plastic shield for sun glare. Is there any way to remove this coating? One slider has clouded over, and the coating has chipped and blistered in spots. It could be a broken seal, but the areas that have no coating are perfectly clear. Answer: The best solution I've read is from my buddies the Carey Bros. of San Francisco: Spray the coating with ammonia, cover it immediately with Saran Wrap, wait 45 minutes, and then scrape it off with a broad-blade putty knife.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: About three years ago, the trim on my sister's house was cleaned, sanded, and repainted with the same good-quality, oil-based paint. Now, for the first time in 25 years, she's discovered what definitely looks to be mold on a door that had been cleaned with house wash and Clorox. Dirt or soot not evident before is also there. It soon spread to adjacent windows and trim and is now everywhere all around the house regardless of sun or shade and even inside storm windows. None of the neighbors has this problem.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: What are the basics of DryVit care? Our home was built 10 years ago, and we've lived here almost three years. I don't know if it's ever been repainted since installation. Can it be power washed? (It's getting mildew streaks on the shady, damp side of the house.) When it's time to paint, does it require a special product? Answer: The manufacturer recommends that the surface be cleaned every five years. DryVit products include mildew-retarding agents, but mildew can still grow under the proper conditions, especially warm, moist, and shady.
NEWS
July 24, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
South Jersey farmers in the Vineland area spotted the fungus about two weeks ago. Sweet basil plants were yellowing, and brown spores appeared on the underside of the herb's leaves. Though seen on other crops, downy mildew is relatively new to basil in the United States. It wiped out much of the crop on East Coast farms, including those in New Jersey, last summer. The aggressive disease was carried on the wind from the south, and, if it spreads as before, it will again discolor and disfigure the region's crop, reducing availability and likely driving up prices.
LIVING
April 30, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: My mother, who believes that if you say it is so, it must be so, has a vinyl roof on her bay window that she wants to repaint. My Internet search found that it can be done, and that a high-quality, 100 percent latex paint should be used, but she needs to hear it from the master. Answer: The "master" defers to the Rohm & Haas Paint Quality Institute, which has never steered him wrong. The PQI says, "Yes, you can," with the proper surface preparation and, as you say, a high-quality, 100 percent latex paint.
LIVING
October 31, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I have a composite deck, light gray in color, and, even though I clean it two times a year with a power washer, there still is this light green mold that appears under the railing and on the steps. Do you have any suggestions for cleaning, and what type of cleaner/detergent do you suggest? Answer: As you surmise, mildew forms where the sun don't shine, even on "maintenance-free" composite decking. Just to clarify: No manufacturer ever claims its products are maintenance-free.
LIVING
April 11, 2008 | By Elaine Markoutsas FOR THE INQUIRER
Offering the look of supple leather and silky chenille, plush mohair velvet and gossamer sheers, outdoor fabrics are getting so sophisticated that they're spot-on matches to the most fashion-forward of their indoor counterparts. And consumers are catching on to the fact that there's incredible substance beyond the style. The durable materials are colorfast under exposure to intense sun and resistant to stains, mildew and odors. Designed for outdoor furniture but with looks that mimic indoor decor, the fabrics have come full circle - they're being marketed for indoor use as well.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Mary L. Carlin
Lysol has become the St. George of our time, conquering Nature as represented by viruses, bacteria, mold and mildew. Nature is represented on the label by a soothing pastoral scene, replete with rising sun, woods, water and lavender fields. The irony is that nature is exactly what is being kept at bay, or at least contained. How much more honest it would be to have microscopic images of the nasties the product is meant to destroy - although that might put off some impulse buyers. The label's soothing pastoral scene is undercut by the word kills not once, but twice, on the label above it, followed by the not much more comforting eliminates.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|