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Miles Davis

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NEWS
June 22, 1990 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Miles Davis performed a spellbinding show Wednesday night at the Academy of Music, another in this year's series of Mellon Jazz events. Even when not playing his trumpet, Davis paced the stage like a man with something on his mind, occasionally striking a chord on one of the electric keyboards stacked in front of his drummer, Ricky Wellman. Frequently, Davis beckoned saxophonist Kenny Garrett or guitarist Foley to join him out front, blowing his trumpet like a pitchpipe into the face of the chosen sideman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Last night it was possible to see Miles Davis in two different mediums. On television, he appeared in a rerun episode of Miami Vice as a suavely attired, tight-lipped pimp. And on the stage of the Academy of Music, he appeared as a suavely attired, tight-lipped jazz trumpeter. The Miami Vice appearance was a lark; jazz is where Davis' presence continues to be felt. Some fans, however, would say that much of Davis' recent jazz has been a lark as well - that his two most recent albums, Decoy and You're Under Arrest, were efforts of decidedly mixed quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Jazz Columnist
Miles Davis is viewed initially as we remember him from the late 1950s - decked in a severely tailored "Ivy League" suit (an avant-garde fashion statement of the time), leaning slightly forward in the attitude of an inverted question mark, butting his muted trumpet flat against the business end of a microphone and playing the horn in the saturnine, yearning, gently sparring style that had made him the rage of the jazz world on five continents. We next see him some three decades later in his current modal embodiment, that of an Old Testament prophet inexplicably incarnate in a visitor from a strange planet wearing billowing pajamas of a mottled silver lame fabric overlaid by a flowing deep-blue kimono and blue plastic shades, and voicing messages from the ionosphere via the electrified trumpet he presses to his lips.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER Dan DeLuca and Tom Moon also contributed
In December 1997, avant-blues diva Cassandra Wilson stepped onto the stage of Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall in New York to debut Travelling Miles, her tribute to the music and spectacle of jazz composer Miles Davis. With her large ensemble and smoky, winding voice intact (as always a gentle, sexy blend of Sarah Vaughan and Betty Carter), Wilson swept through all phases of Davis' work. Bebop. Early fusion. The infamous '60s quintet. His latter-day pop sounds. Rather than copy Miles, Wilson peeked into his shadows, basked in the glow of his darkness, and remembered the feeling, the noir atmospherics, Miles' run-down voodoo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wallace Roney wants it known that he's not out to replace Miles Davis. But there's hardly any doubt that the late trumpeter was a major influence on the young musician. Roney even has a couple of Davis' horns, which, needless to say, he will always treasure. "Oh, sure, I play them," said Roney, who did most of his growing up in North Philadelphia. "Not so much in public, though. But I'll occasionally sneak one in during a performance. " Roney, who said he tours "perpetually," returned Monday from a two-week concert tour of Japan as a member of Ray Brown's All-Star Jam and will appear with his own group Sunday at Zanzibar Blue.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
If there was ever a musician deserving of a tribute, it's Miles Davis. Tony Williams, who played with Davis in his '60s fusion-rock era, comes to Philadelphia drumming the praises of one of the century's greatest, and most controversial, musical geniuses. Williams' quintet, which in its current edition brings in Mulgrew Miller on piano and Philadelphia-born Wallace Roney on trumpet, will play a set of Davis compositions Monday night at the Aztec Club near Penn's Landing. The concert will also begin a series of Monday jazz nights there.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Music Critic The Associated Press contributed to this article
Miles Davis, 65, the jazz composer, bandleader and trumpeter responsible for much of the music's stylistic evolution since the 1940s, died yesterday. Mr. Davis, who was known for his direct tone and searching, imploring melodies, died at 10:46 a.m. at St. John's Hospital and Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif., after a month-long hospital stay. His doctor, Jeff Harris, said the cause of death was pneumonia, respiratory failure and stroke. The ailments were the latest in a series of health problems that included heroin and cocaine addictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Alberti had the blues for a long time as a teenager. Then when he was 17 - maybe it was 18 - his father gave him a Miles Davis album, and that changed everything. The young drummer, who began playing with a blues band that worked Main Line nightspots when he was 15, was so taken by the Davis disc that he began practicing a jazz-drumming technique. It was quite a departure from blues and rock percussion. "I kept practicing while working in Top 40 bands and such to make a living," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1987 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Say what you will about Miles Davis' recent funk albums - and I'll say worse. Yet in concert, Davis remains an electrifying presence. Why? Because whatever Davis is playing now, good or bad, other musicians will be playing six months from now. It has long been that way. Tonight, the charismatic trumpeter performs at the Valley Forge Music Fair, off Route 252 in Devon, with singer Beverly Mickins. Show time is 8 p.m., and tickets cost $20. For more information, call 644-5000. In any week Davis is in town, the best bet is a foregone conclusion.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | By J. Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This includes reports from the Associated Press, USA Today and the New York Daily News
Jazz great Miles Davis was an "active drug abuser" and "not of sound mind and memory" when he wrote his will in 1989, according to his son, Gregory Davis, who is contesting the will. Gregory was left no part of the $1 million estate. His father said in his autobiography that Gregory had caused him "all kinds of grief. " Also: "I know he loved me and really wanted to be like me. He used to try to play trumpet, but he played it so bad, it was just terrible to listen. I would scream at him to stop.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The house lights never dimmed at the Academy of Music on Saturday night, just one indication that the duo performance by Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea was going to be more informal than most. The two jazz piano giants strolled casually on stage with no fanfare, arms slung around each other's shoulders, and picked up a pair of microphones. For a moment, it seemed they were going to launch into a comedy routine or a romantic vocal duet. Instead, they engaged in a bit of light banter ("Where's Pep's?"
NEWS
April 28, 2013
Leo Branton Jr., 91, a lawyer who helped successfully defend Angela Davis in a sensational 1972 murder case, died of natural causes April 19 in Los Angeles, his son, Tony Nicholas, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Branton, the only black graduate in Northwestern University's 1948 law school class, had decades of civil rights law experience when he became co-lead defense counsel at Davis' trial. Davis gained national attention in 1969 when she was fired as a University of California, Los Angeles professor for being a member of the Communist Party.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
NORMAN GADSON bought John Coltrane's old house in Strawberry Mansion in 2004 from Mary "Cousin Mary" Alexander, a relative of the jazz saxophonist. Not long after, he'd call up musicians in the city and ask them to come over to jam in 'Trane's house. Lenora Early, Gadson's widow, said her husband, a fervent jazz fan, intended to fix up the house and open it as a jazz venue. "He just loved jazz," Early said of Gadson. But he died in 2007, before he could restore the house, on 33rd Street near Oxford.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Warren Simpkins, 84, a real estate broker in West Philadelphia, who enjoyed listening to jazz and helping young people interested in careers in real estate, died of heart failure Monday, Oct. 7 at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Simpkins was the head of One Stop Realty, a firm in the 5100 block of Baltimore Avenue, which he founded in 1989 and operated until his death. As a young man, Mr. Simpkins worked at Valley Forge Hospital and later for about 30 years at the U.S. Frankford Arsenal as an equal-employment officer, retiring in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | BY CHRIS BARTON, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The cavernous dance club in downtown L.A. is hopping, and the weekend is still a day away. The club is ordinarily a hotbed of thumping house music, but tonight, the headliner - Houston-born jazz pianist and bandleader Robert Glasper - is switching things up. Behind a bank of keyboards, Glasper leads his quartet through a restless swirl of searching piano melody, causing the crowd to sway under the hazy colored lights. As the song gathers into focus, one musician begins repeating an unmistakable, 40-year-old refrain, his voice shaded by electronics: "A love supreme . . . A love supreme . . . " This introduction of John Coltrane (or at least the sounds he inspired)
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
MILTON ANDERSON was the consummate charmer. Dapper in his Sunday best, he would greet congregants at the door of the Reformation Lutheran Church in Mount Airy, paying special attention to the ladies, whom he would welcome in French. How cool was that?   "He was very suave," said his daughter, Tracey L. Anderson. Milton was a pillar of the church, not only as the greeter, but also as a member of the Men's Ministry and the Church Council. He also took it upon himself to provide transportation and guidance to those who needed help and a ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | BY MARY SYDNOR, For the Daily News
KAREEM ROUSTOM is bilingual in Arabic and English - music, that is. The Syrian-born composer is fluent in Arabic and Western styles, which is no easy feat. The two use very different instruments. And Arabic music has quarter tones, which exist between the notes of the traditional Western 12-tone chromatic scale. With so many different types of sounds and rules to keep in mind, composing in both requires considerable musical dexterity. Roustom, who moved to the United States when he was in 7th grade, started on the guitar.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | Associated Press
FORT WORTH, Texas - Cornell Dupree Jr., a guitarist who played on R&B and jazz hits with artists including Aretha Franklin and Miles Davis, has died. He was 68. Dupree died Sunday at home in Fort Worth. His funeral was planned for today. Just out of high school, he went to work in Manhattan with saxophonist King Curtis Ousley, another Fort Worth native. Dupree, who went on to be a studio player, played guitar on "Respect" by Franklin, "Rainy Night in Georgia" by Brook Benton and "Memphis Soul Stew" by King Curtis.
NEWS
February 10, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Trumpeter Jon Hassell doesn't just play jazz for people who don't necessarily get jazz. He also plays pop for people who don't dig conventional pop. Hassell showed as much during Sunday's program at World Cafe Live with his Maarifa Street ensemble. Though he laced solos with themes familiar from John Coltrane and Miles Davis, Hassell's playing fits no category. But the Memphis-born and conservatory-educated (studies with Karlheinz Stockhausen in Cologne, yet) Hassell has been proving this since career's start.
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