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NEWS
December 18, 1998 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tony Bennett won't be leaving his heart in Milford. The township supervisors have effectively killed a community group's plan to build a performing-arts center - where Bennett, Joni Mitchell and James Taylor and others might have serenaded Upper Bucks - on 46 acres next to the township building. In an interview yesterday, Township Manager Jeffrey A. Vey said that while Board President Charlie Strunk strongly supported the plan, the other two supervisors "felt that it wouldn't be in the best interests of the residents of the township.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
FAY CRON (left) and Bruce Cowan of Karkoska Builders attend to details at "The Seasons," a 251-house development rising at the southeast corner of Milford and Taylor Roads in Uwchlan Township. The single-family houses will sit on 1/4-acre lots. The project is the work of Exton's Rouse/Chamberlin Inc.
SPORTS
August 26, 2001 | By Michael Anderson FOR THE INQUIRER
One pitch. Brooklawn's bid for its second straight victory in pool play of the American Legion World Series came down to one pitch yesterday. Fortunately for the Camden County squad, it was the right pitch. First baseman Andrew Noe socked a three-run, eighth-inning home run, lifting his team to a 6-2 victory over Milford (Mass.) in the second of three pool-play games. The victory virtually assured Brooklawn of a berth in the tournament semifinals tomorrow. It would take a Brooklawn setback today against Albany (Ga.)
SPORTS
January 27, 1994 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Temple's football program has received two more verbal commitments. Robert Kelly, a 6-5, 260-pound defensive lineman from Milford (Conn.) Academy, and Justin Collins, a 6-5, 235-pound tight end from Lincoln High School in Tallahassee, Fla., have told second-year Owls coach Ron Dickerson they will attend Temple. The first day of the official weeklong signing period is this coming Wednesday. Temple may not comment until a recruit signs his national letter of intent. Kelly, originally from John F. Kennedy High in the Bronx, was a Super Prep All-America.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
TWO HEARTLESS teenage girls carjacked an 89-year-old woman in a sleepy Delaware town, shoved her into the trunk and drove around for two days with the woman locked inside, police said Thursday. The harrowing ordeal started about 11 a.m. Monday, when Margaret E. Smith left her home in rural Lincoln to go get some lunch. Outside the Chicken Man eatery in nearby Milford, Del., the girls approached Smith and asked her for a ride to Lincoln, according to the Delaware State Police. Smith agreed, but back in Lincoln, the girls demanded her car keys, state police said.
SPORTS
May 9, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi Daily News Sports Writer
Jay Wright became Villanova's coach knowing he would lose his best player, Michael Bradley, to the NBA. He knew the Wildcats struggled the second half of last season, even with Bradley, the nation's field goal percentage leader. He knew he needed some players and needed them now. The Wildcats have gotten a oral commitment from a 7-foot prep school player who was not on an organized basketball team last season. Chris Charles wanted to play, but events conspired against him. The good news for Villanova fans and their coaches is that Charles can play perhaps even at the very highest levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1993 | By Jean Hanff Korelitz, FOR THE INQUIRER
A SEASON IN PURGATORY Fiction. By Dominick Dunne. Crown. $22. A Season in Purgatory, Dominick Dunne's most readable novel since The Two Mrs. Grenvilles, is a recast of Evelyn Waugh's extraordinary Brideshead Revisited with a very Kennedy-like Connecticut family in the Marchmain-Flyte role. Here, in place of Charles Ilyder's Oxford, Dunne gives us Milford, the exclusive Catholic boarding school where narrator Harrison Burnes, a scholarship student, meets the man whose crime will cloud his life: Constant Bradley, youngest son of the wildly ambitious Gerald Bradley, a millionaire with vague underworld connections, and his wife, Grace, a pious woman who collects priests and couture and turns a blind eye to her sons' misadventures.
SPORTS
October 8, 1986 | By Chuck Newman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Domonoski had suffered through almost four years waiting for such a happening. Longer than most of the other celebrators. And he had paid his dues. And when it finally came, his celebration had to be delayed. "It was a great feeling. A great feeling," the senior linebacker said of Temple's 19-13 win over Pitt on Saturday. "But that flying (back to Philadelphia), you know, I don't like that at all. I was biting my nails, just like I usually do. " It was Saturday night, and the Owls had just beaten Pitt for the second time in three years and scored a major victory for the program.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A local librarian's plan to encourage teenagers to read was recognized by the American Library Association as one of the top 30 programs in the nation for young adults. Noreen Moore, an assistant librarian at the Levittown Regional Library, created Teen Talk, a radio program featuring book reviews by middle school and high school students. The program, which premiered in January on WBCB-AM (1490), aired twice a week until school ended in June. Moore said she expected the program to resume in September.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rain does not fall softly on a tent. It pounds. It rattles. It declares its intent - to drench all it touches. Some tents are up to the challenge, woven and crafted to withstand the rigors of the Himalayas. Ours clearly was not. But we're getting ahead of ourselves. It was a simple plan that brought us to the shores of the Delaware where Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey meet to form another one of those boundaryless tristate areas that are the stuff of weather forecasts and car ads. The Harrises, neighbors from our former town in North Jersey, had suggested we get our kids together for a long weekend of camping and canoeing.
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NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
TWO HEARTLESS teenage girls carjacked an 89-year-old woman in a sleepy Delaware town, shoved her into the trunk and drove around for two days with the woman locked inside, police said Thursday. The harrowing ordeal started about 11 a.m. Monday, when Margaret E. Smith left her home in rural Lincoln to go get some lunch. Outside the Chicken Man eatery in nearby Milford, Del., the girls approached Smith and asked her for a ride to Lincoln, according to the Delaware State Police. Smith agreed, but back in Lincoln, the girls demanded her car keys, state police said.
NEWS
October 18, 2009 | By Beth D'Addono FOR THE INQUIRER
Driving north on leafy Route 209 along a section of the Delaware River that dips into the 70,000-acre Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, it's easy to see why Gifford Pinchot was passionate about conservation. The two-time Pennsylvania governor, who is credited with starting the U.S. Forest Service in 1905, spent most of his life surrounded by these woods, fly-fishing on the river and trekking along the steep bluffs of Pennsylvania bluestone that surround this Pike County seat.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | By Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karisa Solt read Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace at age 12 and scored 1,450 on her SATs at age 14. Late last month, she became the youngest graduate in the history of Newark's New Jersey Institute of Technology, picking up a degree in biomedical engineering at age 18 with a cumulative grade-point average of 3.99. It's a rare feat: Nearly half of all college students received their bachelor's degrees at age 22 or younger, but only 0.1 percent did so at 18 or younger, according to a study released last year by the U.S. Department of Education National Center for Education Statistics.
NEWS
November 3, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty-three people were scattered in the pews of Christ's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Trumbauersville last Monday evening. It was the weekly meeting of Concerned Citizens of Milford Township, formed in June to oppose the cobalt 60 irradiator at the CFC Logistics cold-storage warhouse near the Route 663 entrance to the Pennsylvania Turnpike here. They're few. They're facing unpaid bills. And they'd lost a string of legal fights concerning the irradiator against the company.
NEWS
October 30, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board ruled yesterday that a hearing should be held on the license that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission granted CFC Logistics Inc. to operate a cobalt 60 irradiator in Milford Township. Board administrative Judge Michael C. Farrar granted the petition of 25 people represented by lawyers for Concerned Citizens of Milford Township, which has argued against the irradiator since the group formed in June. Farrar wrote that a hearing "would give them the opportunity to present evidence challenging the application of CFC Logistics . . . for an NRC license.
NEWS
October 21, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bucks County Court has ordered the township to permit CFC Logistics to operate its cobalt 60 food irradiator. Judge Kenneth G. Biehn granted the firm's request to have the township issue a use permit. He denied a township request to bar shipment of the radioactive material to CFC. Two weeks ago, a Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman said that CFC had already received its first shipment and had begun testing the cobalt 60. Township Solicitor Terry Clemons said yesterday that he would meet with Milford's Board of Supervisors to discuss "further options.
NEWS
October 15, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
CFC Logistics Inc. has filed suit in federal court in Philadelphia, challenging a Milford Township zoning ordinance that would prevent the firm from operating its cobalt 60 irradiator. The firm recently received an overseas shipment of the radioactive material and already has tested the device that would purify food and other materials. "CFC has now received its cobalt 60 sources and loaded them into the irradiator . . . [with] some pre-start-up testing," Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman Neil Sheehan said.
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
CFC Logistics will challenge the Milford Township zoning ordinance passed this week that effectively prevents the firm from operating a food irradiator using radioactive cobalt 60. "We do feel like [filing a legal challenge] will have to be very quick," company president James Wood said yesterday. Wood expects to get the irradiator up and running by mid-October. The cobalt 60 should arrive by ship from Europe, he said, about the time Bucks County Judge Kenneth Biehn makes a decision that Wood hopes will favor CFC Logistics.
NEWS
September 24, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board in Rockville, Md., refused yesterday to block a license that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued on Aug. 27 to CFC Logistics. During a Sept. 10 hearing in Allentown, a lawyer for Concerned Citizens of Milford Township told the licensing board, an arm of the NRC, that the group feared the effects of a food irradiator at the firm. The irradiator is intended to use gamma rays from radioactive cobalt 60 to cleanse food and other substances.
NEWS
September 23, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Milford Township Manager Jeffrey Vey told Bucks County Court yesterday that "it is highly improbable that [a nuclear accident] will occur" at the cobalt 60 irradiator in his town. Vey said no such accident is likely at CFC Logistics, "even with human intervention" from terrorists. "It is my belief that if the irradiator goes into operation . . . it will be operated safely. " CFC has said it intends to use the irradiator, which uses cobalt that emits gamma rays, to cleanse food and other substances.
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