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Military Aid

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NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Christopher Marquis, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After 12 years of stormy debate, a bipartisan group of House lawmakers agreed yesterday to phase out U.S. military aid to El Salvador. The House Foreign Affairs Committee voted unanimously to limit nonlethal military aid to El Salvador at $21.2 million for 1992 and funnel all future military assistance into a demobilization fund. The funding shift, proposed with the blessings of the Bush administration and the Salvadoran government, comes just six weeks after the Salvadoran armed forces and rebels of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front began a nine-month cease-fire and process of demilitarization.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In a meeting with President Reagan yesterday, Nicaraguan rebel leaders proposed that any new U.S. military aid be held in escrow while peace efforts are under way in Central America. At a 40-minute session with Reagan, seven contra leaders also proposed that the President ask Congress for "immediate and continuous" humanitarian aid after existing funds are exhausted. But they said that "lethal" military assistance should be held back for now to help nudge Nicaragua's Sandinista government toward a final peace accord including democratic reforms.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The rockets that killed dozens of civilians in the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol last weekend also blew up the futile Western strategy for stopping Russian aggression in Ukraine. President Obama and his European allies desperately hoped that sanctions would squeeze Vladimir Putin into accepting a negotiated solution to the conflict. They were dreaming that he would press Russian-backed separatists in Ukraine to abide by the so-called Minsk cease-fire agreement signed in September by representatives of Ukraine, Russia, and Europe.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan's new peace plan for Central America may help him win a battle in Congress over new military aid to the Nicaraguan contras, but it is unlikely to bring peace to Central America, according to experts on the region. The major obstacle, all agree, is that Reagan is continuing to demand that Sandinista leaders surrender power, change their governmental system and order new elections. That is a condition, they say, that the Sandinista leadership has rejected many times and is unlikely to accept now, or ever.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Peter H. Kostmayer charged during a foreign-policy debate yesterday that David A. Christian, his Republican opponent in the Eighth Congressional District, would be "a rubber stamp for the Pentagon," while Christian accused Kostmayer of being "on all sides of all the issues. " The debate, an almost-civil exchange between two men whose relations have at times been heated, will be broadcast this morning at 8:30 a.m. on Channel 10. It was sponsored by WCAU and the League of Women Voters.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau Reuters contributed to this article
The Bush administration signaled yesterday that it intended to release $42.5 million in military aid to El Salvador because of what it said was stepped-up guerrilla activity by anti-government rebels. Assistant Secretary of State Bernard Aronson told reporters that the administration had hoped to use the funds for peaceful purposes. However, he said, continued armed resistance by the rebels was forcing the administration's hand. "We are obviously not able to allow the government to lose its ability to defend itself at a time when the guerrillas are stepping up the war," he said.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration signaled Monday that U.S. national security interests will trump its promotion of Egypt's budding democracy, stressing the importance of continued aid to the Egyptian military, which overthrew the elected president last week. As violence blazed between security forces and supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, the White House and State Department both urged the military to exercise "maximum restraint. " They also said the military would not be punished with a cutoff of its $1.3 billion in annual U.S. aid for toppling Morsi.
NEWS
July 20, 1986
If the United States is going to pressure foreign nations to suppress the drug producers in their midst, Washington must support their struggle. That's the bottom line when judging the wisdom of sending 100 soldiers and six helicopters to Bolivia, the world's second largest producer of coca leaves, to help fight its cocaine lords. But from that point on, a lot of questions need to be aired. First off, is military aid necessary? Bolivian President Victor Paz Estenssoro doesn't doubt it. As head of a fragile, impoverished democracy where the cocaine economy is larger than the projected 1987 government budget, he's afraid the cocaine lords may soon buy the government.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | By R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The final $40 million allocated for military aid to the Nicaraguan contras would be denied under legislation introduced in the House yesterday. A bill introduced by three Connecticut congressmen would cut off all U.S. assistance to the contras, blocking payment of the final installment in the $100 million military aid package that Congress approved last year. A companion bill has already been introduced in the Senate. House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Dante B. Fascell (D., Fla.)
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | By Trudy Rubin
President Bush said this week that he had set a "clear policy" for the second stage of the war on terror: the United States will provide military aid to "governments everywhere" to fight terrorists. If you color the map blue for countries where we're already sending military assistance, the blue streak is spreading like spilled paint. Beyond Afghanistan, we're involved, so far, in the Philippines, Yemen, Uzbekistan, and now Georgia, a troubled Caucasus nation just south of Russia.
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NEWS
August 16, 2016
ISSUE | HAITI U.S. aid sorely needed It is deplorable that the United States sends military aid to the Dominican Republic and trains its police and border patrol officers, while that Caribbean country has stripped the citizenship of 200,000 Dominican-born Haitians ("No country to call home," Tuesday). In the past year, more than 60,000 people have been deported, while Haiti struggles to recover from a 2010 hurricane. It is time for the United States to give Haiti's economy a boost so its citizens won't need to leave to find jobs.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
AMMAN, Jordan - When ISIS jihadis poured into Iraq from Syria in June and attacked Sheikh Abdullah al-Yawar's compound, he urged the Iraqi government to fly weapons to a nearby airfield so his Sunni tribesmen could hit back. But the Iraqi defense minister refused Yawar's offer, which might have prevented the capture of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. After Mosul fell, Yawar asked Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to let him recruit two battalions of tribesmen to police the border and prevent more jihadis from crossing.
NEWS
February 10, 2015
ISSUE | WAR IN UKRAINE Warming volunteers A recent visit to Kiev demonstrated to me that, while Ukraine is waiting for military aid, there is much we can do ("Ukraine needs military aid," Jan. 29). As one battalion commander, Andrij Teteryk, reminded me, Ukraine's battalions are volunteer and depend on the generosity of the Ukrainian people. There are 43 battalions fighting in eastern Ukraine, comprising 200 to 600 volunteers. Supply chains have been set up for food and warm clothing, which are delivered by convoy to the war area.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The rockets that killed dozens of civilians in the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol last weekend also blew up the futile Western strategy for stopping Russian aggression in Ukraine. President Obama and his European allies desperately hoped that sanctions would squeeze Vladimir Putin into accepting a negotiated solution to the conflict. They were dreaming that he would press Russian-backed separatists in Ukraine to abide by the so-called Minsk cease-fire agreement signed in September by representatives of Ukraine, Russia, and Europe.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Syrian Kurdish leader's voice on the telephone on Monday sounded desperate. He told me ISIS is on the verge of defeating Syrian Kurds, who have been fighting fiercely for weeks to defend the town of Kobani near the Turkish border. "There are 15,000 to 20,000 civilians still in Kobani, people who say they will die on the ground," said Salih Muslim, the top Kurdish opposition leader in northern Syria. "There were air strikes . . . but not efficiently enough to stop the attacks on Kobani.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
D iplomacy , diplomacy , diplomacy . Partners , partners . These were the buzzwords President Obama hammered home in the foreign policy portion of his State of the Union address, as the core of his global strategy for the next three years. "America must move off a permanent war footing," he said. "I strongly believe our leadership and our security cannot depend on the military alone. " Instead, we have to build "the capacity of our foreign partners" and engage in "strong and principled diplomacy.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Should America still be trying to promote democracy abroad - especially when its own is so dysfunctional? This question has been nagging at me since the Obama administration announced a partial freeze on military aid to Egypt last week. The aim: to (belatedly) display U.S. displeasure over the Egyptian military's bloody ouster of an elected president in July. (The aid will be restored if Egypt makes progress toward an "inclusive" elected government.) The cutoff was avidly pushed by both Republican and Democratic members of Congress (even as they were sliding toward a possible debt default)
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Anyone who doubts the dangerous consequences of White House waffling on Syria should note some startling statements by U.S. officials in recent days. Let's start at the top. After two years of insistence that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad must go, the White House started publicly hedging last week. No doubt that was a reaction to the fact that Assad, armed and aided by Russia, Iran, and the Lebanese terrorist group Hezbollah, has been scoring major victories against the Syrian rebels.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United States is delaying delivery of four F-16 fighter jets to Egypt in light of the military overthrow of Mohammed Morsi as president, but it has not decided whether to suspend military aid more broadly, the Pentagon said Wednesday. Pentagon press secretary George Little said President Obama made the decision to hold up the F-16 delivery while the administration continues to review options and consult with Congress on military assistance generally. The four F-16s were to be delivered under a previously arranged sale of 20. Eight of the F-16s were delivered earlier this year; after the four originally set for delivery this week the final eight were to be sent later this year.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration signaled Monday that U.S. national security interests will trump its promotion of Egypt's budding democracy, stressing the importance of continued aid to the Egyptian military, which overthrew the elected president last week. As violence blazed between security forces and supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, the White House and State Department both urged the military to exercise "maximum restraint. " They also said the military would not be punished with a cutoff of its $1.3 billion in annual U.S. aid for toppling Morsi.
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