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Military Aid

NEWS
September 18, 1991 | By Christopher Marquis, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush yesterday defended his efforts to send U.S. military aid and trainers to fight drug trafficking in Peru, brushing aside charges from Congress that he is glossing over Peru's dismal human rights record. Bush, emerging from a meeting with Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori, justified his request to send $34.9 million in military aid and "several dozen" U.S. trainers to Peru, saying the reformist leader is his country's "hope for the future. " Bush urged Congress to lift a freeze it placed on the entire $94.9 million U.S. aid package to Peru, contending that Fujimori's 15-month-old government has made "progress" toward ensuring that human rights are respected by his nation's freewheeling security forces.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through wind, sleet and heat on 25 Sundays, demonstrators have massed patiently on the sidewalk outside the elegant East Falls home of U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter. Yesterday, many of the same protesters were in a crowd of more than 700 to measure the effect of their pressure on the senator to vote for a halt in U.S. military aid to El Salvador. As Specter addressed them at St. Joseph's University's Bluett Theater, it briefly appeared the Sunday sidewalk lobbying had succeeded.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | By SUSAN BENNETT, Daily News Staff Writer
House Republicans pulled a fast switch on the Democrats yesterday by voting for an amendment that would have banned all military aid to Nicaraguan rebels. The amendment was attached to a spending bill President Reagan already had promised to veto. The surprise maneuver prevented Democrats from facing down the Reagan administration on its request for $100 million in aid to the Contras, as the rebels are called. Democratic leaders had expected Republicans to vote down the amendment.
NEWS
August 10, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Some colleagues of House Speaker Jim Wright were saying the Texas Democrat had been "snookered" when he lent his name to the scheme Ronald Reagan proposed last week as a "peace initiative" for Central America. But this was before leaders of the five countries in that isthmus took Wright off the hook with a plan of their own. It all happened so quickly that Reagan's strategists apparently still haven't figured out how to discredit the pre-emptive accord just signed by the presidents of all the Central American nations.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By David Hess and Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Reagan administration is preparing a formal request to the Soviets to explore a cryptic offer made last week by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to mutually reduce arms shipments to the warring parties in Nicaragua. The request is going forward despite a White House official's insistence yesterday that there is "no connection" between Soviet military aid to Nicaragua's ruling Sandinistas and U.S. aid to the anti-government contras. As the administration puzzled over the Soviet intentions in Central America, House Democrats voted in a closed-door caucus to reject further military aid to the contras, but left open the possibility of continuing non- lethal assistance.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
In an unprecedented show of bipartisan unity, the Senate is warning Nicaragua's Sandinista government it could face renewed U.S. military aid to the Contra rebels unless it reverses "dramatic new steps in brutality" against its own citizens. In a 91-4 vote, the Senate also said it was ready to extend U.S. economic aid to Nicaragua if the Sandinistas fully comply with commitments made a year ago and "proceed to permit the establishment of a democratic system. " The "sense of the Senate" resolution is non-binding.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Senate Democrats, armoring themselves against election-year attacks by Republicans, outlined a contra-aid package yesterday that would provide $32 million in humanitarian assistance to Nicaraguan rebels and set the stage for a later vote on $16.3 million in military aid. Senate Majority Leader Robert C. Byrd (D., W. Va), said the proposal was designed by "Democrats of all persuasions" after more than two weeks of discussions - and predicted that it would be adopted by the Senate next week as an amendment to a pending military spending bill.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan has decided to ask Congress for $36.25 million in new aid to Nicaragua's contras and will pledge to confer with four Central American presidents before shipping any lethal aid to the rebels. The pledge is intended to soften congressional resistance to the military portion of the aid package, informed administration officials said, and to boost chances of passage for the President's controversial proposal. Reagan told House Minority Leader Robert Michel (R., Ill.)
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Soviet Ambassador Yuri V. Dubinin said yesterday that the Soviet Union was open to any and all discussions with the United States about working together on a peaceful resolution of the conflict in Central America. Although senior Bush administration officials previously have reported no progress in talks with the Soviets on this topic, Dubinin told reporters that the Soviets had set no preconditions to talks. "We are open to discussion on all the subjects of common interests," Dubinin said at an appearance before the Overseas Writers Club here.
NEWS
December 9, 1986
In the old days - early in Ronald Reagan's first term - there were still pockets of resistance to a "one-track" military response to Nicaragua's revolutionary government. The resistance fighters were called "two-trackers " - State Department types who thought it wise to put a few eggs in the diplomatic basket while lobbing shells across the Sandinistas' bow. One by one the pockets got wiped out. And last summer, U.S. ambassador to Honduras John Ferch - no friend of the Sandinistas - was sent packing for presuming to point out that aid to the contras wasn't part of the U.S. approach.
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