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Military Bases

NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - A senior commander in Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard warned that Iran will target U.S. bases in the region in the event of war with Israel, raising the prospect of a broader conflict that would force other countries to get involved, Iranian state television reported Sunday. The comments by Gen. Amir Ali Hajizadeh, who heads the Guard's aerospace division, came amid tension over Iran's nuclear program and Israel's suggestion that it might unilaterally strike Iranian nuclear facilities to scuttle what the United States and its allies believe are efforts to build a bomb.
NEWS
September 1, 2012
Reginald Bartholomew, 76, a senior diplomat and ambassador who served four presidents, negotiated for nuclear disarmament with the Soviet Union and for the preservation of U.S. military bases in Europe, and survived a bomb attack while he was ambassador to Lebanon in 1984, died Monday in New York City. The cause was cancer, said his wife, Rose-Anne. Mr. Bartholomew had already spent 15 years advising presidents and secretaries of state, and parachuting into places like Moscow and Cyprus to help extinguish diplomatic fires, when he received his first appointment as an ambassador, in 1983, to Lebanon.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Verena Dobnik and Samantha Gross, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Moans, sighs, and exclamations erupted Saturday as relatives of 9/11 victims watched four closed-circuit TV feeds from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, that showed the self-proclaimed mastermind of the attacks and codefendants trying to slow their arraignment, a move that drew outbursts from viewers of "come on, are you kidding me?" "It's actually a joke, it feels ridiculous," said Jim Riches, whose firefighter son, Jimmy, died at the World Trade Center. Riches watched the hearing from a movie theater at Fort Hamilton in New York City, one of four U.S. military bases where the arraignment was telecast live for victims' relatives, survivors, and emergency personnel who responded to the attacks.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Mark S. Smith, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Opening another front in her nearly year-old campaign to support service families, first lady Michelle Obama on Wednesday unveiled a new push for jobs on or near military bases. She also announced plans to mark the Joining Forces campaign's first anniversary with a two-day, four-state swing next week that will include stops in election battleground states Pennsylvania and Florida and a chat with comedian Stephen Colbert on his show, The Colbert Report . The Joining Forces organization said it has lined up commitments for more than 15,000 jobs in the coming years.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Open-space preservation groups are celebrating the imminent completion of a $7.5 million deal to conserve 1,800 acres in Jackson Township, one of the fastest-growing areas of New Jersey. The area is in the Pinelands and encompasses the headwaters of the Toms River, which drains into ailing Barnegat Bay. And it is just beyond the end of a runway increasingly being used for combat training at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, Ocean County's largest employer. As such, the deal touches on many of the state's major issues - sprawl, water quality, the economy, and military readiness.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Amy Teibel, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered a crackdown Wednesday on Jewish extremists believed to be responsible for a wave of violence and vandalism against Israeli soldiers and Muslim places of worship. The move followed the arrest of suspected extremists and an attack on a disused mosque. Netanyahu, in a statement, said he had accepted recommendations made by his cabinet ministers to stop the disturbances. The measures empower soldiers to make arrests, ban extremists from contentious areas, and enable military-court trials of rioters.
NEWS
November 20, 2011
Tariq is an Iraqi interpreter whose last name is being withheld for his safety I am an Iraqi citizen who worked as an interpreter with the U.S. military for two years. It was an honor to serve, and I did it because I believed that bringing freedom to Iraq required brave people to stand up and try to make a difference. Now, as a result of my service, I find myself in a dangerous limbo. Before 2003, I thought of the United States primarily as the home of Bruce Willis, Hollywood, and Las Vegas.
NEWS
November 5, 2011 | By Njadvara Musa and Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
MAIDUGURI, Nigeria - Suicide bombers attacked a military base, a car bomb exploded outside a barracks and explosives detonated Friday around northeast Nigeria, a region under siege from a radical Muslim sect, officials said. While casualties weren't immediately clear, one blast struck outside a school where parents had arrived to pick up the children. There was no claim of responsibility, but blame immediately fell to the sect known as Boko Haram, which has staged targeted assassinations and bombings in the region, killing more than 240 people this year across Nigeria's Muslim north, according to a count by the Associated Press.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Jonathan S. Landay, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - With the death of Moammar Gadhafi, Libya's de facto leaders now face the challenge of preserving the fragile unity they enjoyed while the deposed dictator was on the run as they begin transforming their war-battered nation into a democracy after 42 years of tyrannical one-man rule. The task is daunting. The National Transitional Council, the top revolutionary authority, confronts a vast array of problems: bringing the ragtag militias that ousted Gadhafi under control; recovering looted arms; halting revenge attacks on Gadhafi loyalists; caring for thousands of casualties; restoring oil production; repairing war damage; and keeping a lid on regional tensions and radical Islam.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Mike Baker, Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. - North Carolina is losing out on a congressional seat and future tax dollars because so many of its military personnel were deployed during the U.S. Census and counted in population totals for other states, according to an Associated Press review. The census counts most troops at the base where they live and work. But for personnel who are deployed overseas, the government tallies them for their home state - often where the service member grew up or has family. For example, a soldier based at Fort Bragg in North Carolina could list his or her home as being in Oklahoma because that's where he or she was raised.
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