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Military Budget

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NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By David Hess and Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Alarmed by opinion surveys indicating a sharp drop in public support for his trillion-dollar military buildup, President Reagan launched a drive last night to save his arms programs from threatened cutbacks this year in Congress. In a nationally televised speech from the White House Oval Office, Reagan said the contemplated cuts would be "reckless, dangerous and wrong. It's backsliding of the most irresponsible kind, and you (the public) need to know about it. " Promising that the "biggest increases in defense spending are behind us," the President insisted that now was not the time to slacken the military buildup.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | By MATTHEW MILLER
A dangerous paradox was ignored in the strategic review unveiled by the Pentagon last week: We're spending too much on defense, yet our troops are at risk of being unready to fight. How can both of these things be true? Start with the question of money. Advocates for more defense dollars say that troop levels and Pentagon budgets have dropped more than 30 percent since their "Cold War peak," hollowing out our forces. But that "Cold War peak" is misleading, since it came in 1985, the height of the Reagan buildup.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | VOTERAMA IN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON - Here is how Philadelphia-area members of Congress voted on major issues: House GOP spending plan. Voting 215-209, the House on Thursday passed a Republican bill (HR 6684) to replace about $110 billion in soon-to-begin across-the-board cuts in military and domestic spending with a new round of domestic spending cuts. Sponsored by Rep. Paul Ryan (R., Wis.), the bill's main purpose was to head off $55 billion in automatic defense cuts over one year scheduled to start Jan. 3 under "sequester" rules of the 2011 Budget Control Act. A yes vote was to pass the bill.
NEWS
July 16, 1991
Bill's world From Bill Tammeus, Kansas City Star: Iraq's nuclear weapons program should have been obvious from the sign occasionally seen on Saddam Hussein's office door: "Gone Fission. " The standard of living for Americans declined last year, new figures show. Probably because the gross national product got even grosser. Seeing Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams in the Rose Garden with President Bush last week reminded us why no one ever suggests building a Politicians Hall of Fame.
NEWS
September 9, 1986
The Soviet Union is making its most serious nuclear arms proposals within memory. The Soviets' assurances of on-site inspection by the United States remove a sticking point of long duration. The Reagan administration is treating the Soviet proposals as if they're the plague. I don't view the Soviet proposals as signifying a change in their dictatorial style of government or a change in global policy. Let's face it, even though the Soviets lack democracy, they can't totally ignore the human needs of their people.
NEWS
February 27, 2011
In the push to cut federal spending, Congress and President Obama need to get serious about reducing the military's budget. The Pentagon was largely protected during House Republicans' recent move to cut more than $60 billion from the current year's budget. And Defense Secretary Robert Gates' promise to cut $78 billion over five years would only slow growth in the military budget. The military accounts for an enormous share of federal spending. The Defense Department's proposed budget for fiscal 2012 is $553 billion.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | By Mark Thompson and R. A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The influential chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee assailed the Pentagon yesterday for basing its proposed 1991 budget "on a 1988 threat and a 1988 strategy. " But Sen. Sam Nunn (D., Ga.) also criticized members of his own party for seeking deep military budget cuts that he said would anger the nation's troops, force them from their chosen careers and consequently "damage our ability to respond to future threats. " Nunn's Senate remarks were his first extensive public comments on next year's Pentagon budget.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | BY JESSE JACKSON
President Bush, who has been flailing about trying to defend the worst economic record since Herbert Hoover, last week scored Gov. Bill Clinton for proposing cuts in the military that the president says will weaken the country and cost many their jobs. This dog won't hunt. The Cold War is over; the Soviet Union doesn't exist. We are wasting billions preparing for war against a country that we are giving billions to help. No matter who is elected, the military budget is going down.
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NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Richard Lardner and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United States is at risk of becoming a second-rate power if automatic budget cuts go into effect, plunging the armed forces into the most significant readiness crisis they have faced in more than a decade, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta warned Thursday. Panetta, who is retiring soon from his post, told the Senate Armed Services Committee that if the reductions are allowed to stand he would have to throw the country's national defense strategy "out the window. " But he also assured lawmakers the Pentagon would take the steps necessary to deal with possible threats in the Persian Gulf region after he approved the Navy's request to halve its aircraft carrier presence in the area.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | VOTERAMA IN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON - Here is how Philadelphia-area members of Congress voted on major issues: House GOP spending plan. Voting 215-209, the House on Thursday passed a Republican bill (HR 6684) to replace about $110 billion in soon-to-begin across-the-board cuts in military and domestic spending with a new round of domestic spending cuts. Sponsored by Rep. Paul Ryan (R., Wis.), the bill's main purpose was to head off $55 billion in automatic defense cuts over one year scheduled to start Jan. 3 under "sequester" rules of the 2011 Budget Control Act. A yes vote was to pass the bill.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2012
"In the coming weeks and months, I am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together: reducing our deficit, reforming our tax code, fixing our immigration system, freeing ourselves from foreign oil. " - President Barack Obama, on the night of his reelection. "Mr. President, this is your moment. We're ready to be led - not as Democrats or Republicans, but as Americans. " - House Speaker John A. Boehner, on the fiscal crisis.
NEWS
July 9, 2011 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Money for the Pentagon and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is proving largely immune from the budget-cutting that's slamming other government agencies in the rush to bring down the deficit. On a 336-87 vote Friday, the Republican-controlled House backed a $649 billion defense-spending bill that boosts the Defense Department budget by $17 billion. The strong bipartisan embrace of the measure came as White House and congressional negotiators face an Aug. 2 deadline on agreeing to trillions of dollars in federal spending cuts and raising the borrowing limit so the United States does not default on debt payments.
NEWS
May 3, 2011
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. I believed the moon landing happened because I saw it on television, and I had no problem believing Lee Harvey Oswald acting alone. But the killing of Osama bin Laden feels fictional. First is the fact that he was living in Abbottabad, a major city in Pakistan near the Pakistani military academy and that, supposedly, no one knew it. Second, our forces lost no one despite having a helicopter crash. Finally, there is the lack of a body on display.
NEWS
February 27, 2011
In the push to cut federal spending, Congress and President Obama need to get serious about reducing the military's budget. The Pentagon was largely protected during House Republicans' recent move to cut more than $60 billion from the current year's budget. And Defense Secretary Robert Gates' promise to cut $78 billion over five years would only slow growth in the military budget. The military accounts for an enormous share of federal spending. The Defense Department's proposed budget for fiscal 2012 is $553 billion.
NEWS
August 11, 2010
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates' plan to curb military spending is a needed step, but Congress should work on cutting the Pentagon's budget even further. Gates on Monday laid out a specific proposal to trim defense spending by $100 billion over the next five years. Among the cuts, he'd eliminate a military command in Norfolk, Va., and shrink the number of private contractors who are paid by the Pentagon. Saving $100 billion is nothing to shrug at. And Gates should get credit for trying to reduce administrative costs without harming the nation's fighting ability.
NEWS
February 4, 2003 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Bush administration's 2004 military budget, described offhandedly by one official as "about a billion dollars a day or $42 million an hour," provides more money for missile defense, ships and unmanned aircraft - but no money for war with Iraq. Pentagon officials said the cost of any conflict would have to be added to the $379.9 billion request submitted to Congress yesterday for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. The military budget represents about 17 percent of President Bush's overall 2004 federal budget proposal.
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