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Military Intervention

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NEWS
December 1, 1987 | By Alfonso Chardy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Two congressmen closely identified with Haitian affairs called yesterday for U.S. military intervention in Haiti in the wake of its bloody election crisis, but State Department sources said such action was a remote option. Nevertheless, the Pentagon said that Adm. Frank B. Kelso, commander in chief of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, had begun to monitor the situation in Haiti as a result of the violence, which led to the cancellation of presidential elections there on Sunday. Rep. Stephen J. Solarz, (D., N.Y.)
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syrian officials said Tuesday it "absolutely rejects" any plans to send Arab troops into the country after the Persian Gulf nation of Qatar proposed the idea to stop the mounting deaths in the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. Syria's response showed it was feeling the growing international pressure to halt its deadly military crackdown on dissent. The United States piled on more pressure Tuesday, with a senior administration official saying a recent visit by the commander of Iran's powerful Quds Force to Damascus was the strongest sign yet that Washington's archfoe Tehran was supplying weapons to aid Assad's crackdown.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For Ronald Reagan, the enemy was the Evil Empire. President Clinton has found evil in an assortment of enemies. Currently, there is the NATO campaign against Serbian forces in Yugoslavia. But in the last six years, the Clinton administration has launched military interventions in Haiti, Somalia, Iraq and Bosnia. It has fired missiles into Sudan and Afghanistan. During his trip to Africa last year, President Clinton also said he might have intervened in Rwanda had he been fully cognizant of the extent of the genocidal conflict there.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The top U.S. military commander in Africa warned Monday against any premature military action in Mali, even as he said that al-Qaeda-linked extremists have strengthened their hold on the northern part of the country. Army Gen. Carter Ham said that any military intervention done now would likely fail and would set the precarious situation there back "even farther than they are today. " The African Union and United Nations are currently discussing the funding, troops, and other assistance necessary to take back northern Mali from the extremists who took control earlier this year.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - Radical Islamists have fled a key Malian town because of French air strikes that began after they seized Diabaly nearly one week ago, the Malian military and fleeing residents said late Saturday. A Malian military spokesman, Capt. Modibo Traore, said Saturday soldiers had secured the town. The departure of the Islamists from Diabaly marks a success for the French-led military intervention that began Jan. 11 to oust the Islamists from northern and central Mali. Last week, the Malian military was able to retake another key town, Konna, whose capture had sparked the French intervention.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Group: France risks hostages PARIS - An al-Qaeda-affiliated group is accusing France of endangering the lives of a half-dozen French hostages by helping to organize a military intervention in Mali instead of negotiating for the hostages' release. The accusation, in an online video, came from Abdel Hamid Abu Zeid, a battle-hardened Algerian who leads the most active of three squads of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), the terrorist group's affiliate in the Sahel region of northern Africa.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Baba Ahmed and Rukmini Callimachi, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - Soldiers arrested Mali's prime minister and forced him to resign before dawn Tuesday, showing that the military remains the real power in this troubled West African nation despite handing back authority to civilians after a March coup. The ouster comes as the United Nations considers backing a military intervention in Mali, a once-stable country now in turmoil. By late Tuesday, a new prime minister had been named, but the developments drew international rebuke and raised questions on the viability of the military operation, which would use the country's military to try to take back Mali's north from Islamic extremists.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton sought Algeria's assistance Monday for any future military intervention in Mali, pressing the North African nation to provide intelligence - if not boots on the ground - to help rout the al-Qaeda-linked militants across its southern border. Clinton, on the first stop of a five-day trip overseas, met with Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika as the United States and its allies ramped up preparations to fight northern Mali's breakaway Islamist republic.
NEWS
April 18, 1986
The President's actions against Libya and his efforts to fund a wider war in Central America are ominous for the people of those lands and for Americans. Although the policies are presented to the American people in terms of abstract international imperatives, the reality is intensely human. More than 100 Libyans and tens of thousands of Nicaraguans on both sides of the contra war have been killed, injured and displaced. More military action in the Middle East and further funding of the contras will certainly multiply the suffering.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Rukmini Callimachi and Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
SEVARE, Mali - Islamic extremists based in the Malian town of Ansongo have destroyed a bridge near the Niger border, officials said Friday, marking the first use of explosives by the insurgents since the start two weeks ago of a French-led military intervention. The explosion shows that the extremists remain a nimble and daunting enemy, despite gains by the French, who have recaptured three towns from the insurgents and pushed Friday toward the Islamist stronghold of Gao, one of three provincial capitals controlled by the al-Qaeda-linked rebels.
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NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
  WASHINGTON - Pushing for airstrikes in Syria almost exactly one year ago, President Obama found almost no support from Philadelphia-area lawmakers. But two beheadings of journalists by the rising extremist group known as ISIS - the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria - have changed the attitudes of many voters, and local members of Congress. As Obama prepares a 9 p.m. address Wednesday to lay out plans to confront ISIS, Democrats and Republicans alike say their constituents are worried about the group, and many of the region's representatives now support military intervention.
NEWS
September 17, 2013
Contrary to those who have caricatured him as an extremist or a tyrant, President Obama tends to search for middle ground almost reflexively. No doubt this useful habit served him well throughout much of his life as an organizer, lawyer, and legislator. In the presidency, however, it has sometimes done him in. Obama's approach to the civil war in Syria is the latest and perhaps most glaring example. There is a line brighter than Obama's infamous red one between military intervention and the lack thereof, and Obama's endless attempts to straddle it have rendered his Syria policy a muddle.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As President Obama and lawmakers grapple with Syria's alleged chemical attacks, Bob Casey of Pennsylvania has a seat near the center of new maneuvering in the Senate. Casey, a Democrat, is part of a small bipartisan group of senators working on a plan to give Obama authorization to use military force in Syria if its leaders fail to turn over its chemical weapons to international monitors - an option that has gained momentum in recent days. That idea, first proposed by Russia, is now the subject of high-level diplomatic talks, taking the focus off Congress for now and placing it on the international stage.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As Congress debates whether or not America should launch missile strikes on Syria, one question dwarfs all others: Would we be worse off by not acting than by acting? President Obama has boxed himself and the country into a situation where either choice is a bad one. His declared reason for a military strike - to deter and degrade Bashar al-Assad's ability to use chemical weapons - is insufficient. But his foreign policy credibility would be shattered if the international drama he's triggered with his red lines ends up with ... nothing.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
THERE'S LITTLE doubt that President Obama's "red line" - the use of chemical weapons - has been crossed in Syria's bloody, two-year civil war, but what comes next is less certain. Last week, the aid group Doctors Without Borders announced that more than 3,600 patients displaying neurotoxic symptoms had been seen at Damascus-area hospitals within hours, and that more than 350 had died. The Syrian government called the allegations "absolutely baseless. " The apparent attack by Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces brought forceful rhetoric from Secretary of State John Kerry and has Obama mulling a limited military strike.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Josh Lederman and Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama urged Egypt's military Wednesday to hand back control to a democratic, civilian government without delay but stopped short of calling the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi a coup. Obama said he was "deeply concerned" by the move to topple Morsi and suspend the constitution. He said he was ordering the U.S. government to assess what the actions meant for U.S. foreign aid to Egypt. Under U.S. law, the government must suspend foreign aid to any nation whose elected leader is ousted in a coup.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Edward Cody, Washington Post
PARIS - A uniformed French soldier on an antiterrorism patrol west of Paris was wounded in the neck Saturday by a robed assailant wielding a box cutter, police and subway authorities said. The soldier was reported to be out of danger after being transported to a nearby military hospital. But the attack sent a shudder through the French capital because it recalled the gory killing of a soldier in the streets of London on Wednesday allegedly by a pair of homegrown Muslim extremists, an act that the British government called terrorism.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Elaine Ganley, Associated Press
PARIS - An Algeria-based al-Qaeda offshoot said in an online video on Tuesday that Muslims have an obligation to attack French interests around the world because of France's military intervention in Mali. In a message posted on YouTube, Abou Obeida Youssef Al-Annabi, a notable in the al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb group, or AQIM, said the "crusade" led by France in Mali makes its interests "legitimate targets. " French President Francois Hollande said he takes the threat seriously.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
KANO, Nigeria - Radical Islamic fighters killed seven foreign hostages in Nigeria, European diplomats said Sunday, making it the worst such kidnapping violence in decades for a country beset by extremist guerrilla attacks. Nigeria's police, military, domestic spy service, and presidency remained silent over the killings of the construction company workers, kidnapped Feb. 16 from northern Bauchi state. The government's silence only led to more questions about the nation's continued inability to halt attacks that have seen hundreds killed in shootings, church bombings, and an attack on the United Nations.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Angela Charlton, Associated Press
PARIS - France's defense minister said Tuesday that French troops were involved in "very violent fighting" in the mountains of northern Mali and that it was too early to talk about a quick pullout from the West African country, despite the growing cost of the intervention. The fighting against Islamic extremists in the Adrar des Ifoghas mountains has been going on for days. A clash in the area killed 23 soldiers from neighboring Chad on Friday, according to a letter from French President Francois Hollande expressing condolences to his Chadian counterpart.
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