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Military Junta

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NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Rukmini Callimachi and Laura Burke, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - West Africa's regional bloc announced late Thursday that it was closing all land borders with Mali and freezing the nation's bank account in an effort to force mutinous soldiers from power who seized control in a coup last week. The financial sanctions are among the harshest imposed in recent years on a nation in West Africa and are likely to strangle impoverished Mali, which imports nearly all its gasoline from neighboring Ivory Coast. Kadre Desire Ouedraogo, president of the commission of the Economic Community of West African States, said in Ivory Coast that the sanctions would take effect in 72 hours.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Martin Vogl, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - Mali's interim president, who was beaten by a mob of demonstrators who broke into his office this week, has left the country to seek medical treatment in France, an adviser and two French government officials said Wednesday. The unexpected, and unpublicized, departure of 70-year-old Dioncounda Traore leaves a dangerous power vacuum in the West African nation, which was thrown off course after a March coup. Contacted by telephone, an adviser to Traore said the interim president had left Mali for France to undergo medical tests on his heart because he has had a previous heart attack.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Geir Moulson, Associated Press
BERLIN - A Jesuit priest who was kidnapped by the Argentine military junta in the 1970s said Wednesday that he and a fellow cleric weren't denounced by the future Pope Francis, then leader of Argentina's Jesuits. The Rev. Francisco Jalics, a Hungarian native who now lives in a German monastery, said in a statement that he was following up on comments about the case last week because he had received a lot of questions and "some commentaries imply the opposite of what I meant. " He did not elaborate.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | Daily News wire services
HAITI U.S. FREEZES ASSETS OF HAITIAN NATIONALS President Clinton sought to put more pressure on Haiti's military regime yesterday by ordering American financial institutions to freeze the assets of Haitian nationals residing in Haiti. Meanwhile, most Americans oppose U.S. military intervention to restore democracy in Haiti, and six in 10 want fewer refugees from the Caribbean nation to enter this country, according to an Associated Press poll. President Clinton has not ruled out the use of U.S. military force in Haiti, but the poll shows he also has not rallied public support for that option.
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
President Augusto Pinochet made it clear yesterday that he wanted to be the military regime's candidate for another term in the yes-or-no presidential election scheduled for 1989. "I am sure most Chileans will support us and project the regime for another presidential term," said Pinochet, a 70-year-old army general who has ruled Chile since taking power in a bloody 1973 coup. "This will allow us to consolidate a regime that reflects the essence of national sentiment," he told supporters in Santa Juana, a rural town outside Concepcion, Chile's second-largest city.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gerard Alphonse Ferere has been calling Haiti for days with no luck. His brother-in-law is there. The phone lines don't seem to work. Ferere is worried. "People are being shot indiscriminately. On the street, in the wrong place at the wrong time," says Ferere, a Willow Grove resident who is president of the local Coalition for Haitian Concerns. Ferere, who teaches linguistics and language at St. Joseph's University, will speak out on "how Haiti has been abandoned by the world" at 7 p.m. tomorrow at the Calvary United Methodist Church, 48th Street and Baltimore Avenue.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
The United States has sent a contingent of Marines to the Caribbean to prepare for a possible evacuation of Americans from strife-torn Haiti, a Pentagon source said yesterday. The move came as President Bush said he was "disinclined to use American force" to act against the military takeover on the island. The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said a contingent of "fewer than 500 Marines" had been dispatched from Camp Lejeune, N.C., to the U.S. naval station at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba, which is only a short distance from Haiti.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Law & Order: Buenos Aires , anyone? If The Secret in Their Eyes suggests an artier take on an especially good episode of the ubiquitous TV procedurals (with some Cold Case flashbacks thrown in), the resemblance is more than coincidence. Juan José Campanella, the writer and director of the Argentine thriller - winner of this year's Academy Award for foreign-language film - is a veteran of several Law & Order iterations. And so, this tale of the pursuit of a rapist and murderer, with its grim crime scenes and testy interrogations, its legal strategizing, and third-act twist, has a certain Criminal Intent intensity, a Special Victims Unit specialness about it. Starring a melancholic Ricardo Darín as Benjamin, a criminal court investigator, The Secret in Their Eyes opens with a gauzy reverie at a train station - a man and a woman separated by a departing choo-choo.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | By ACEL MOORE
Though I feel that former President Carter and his team made an agreement in good faith with the military junta in Haiti, considering the events of Tuesday night, the pact no longer has any validity. Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras and his murderous thugs should be put on a raft and pushed into the Caribbean - but not in the direction of the United States. Carter and his team of Sen. Sam Nunn and Gen. Colin Powell brokered the agreement on behalf of President Clinton and, in doing so, they probably prevented a lot of bloodshed if our forces had invaded.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | By John W. Douglas
Washington's recent announcement that it will now vote in the United Nations to condemn violations of human rights in Chile reflects a welcome evolution in American policy toward the dictatorship of Maj. Gen. Augusto Pinochet Ugarte. But the heady return of democracy to the Philippines should not blind us to the difficulties of a similar restoration in Chile. In fact, and despite widespread opposition, the military junta is deeply entrenched there and American leverage is limited.
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NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Geir Moulson, Associated Press
BERLIN - A Jesuit priest who was kidnapped by the Argentine military junta in the 1970s said Wednesday that he and a fellow cleric weren't denounced by the future Pope Francis, then leader of Argentina's Jesuits. The Rev. Francisco Jalics, a Hungarian native who now lives in a German monastery, said in a statement that he was following up on comments about the case last week because he had received a lot of questions and "some commentaries imply the opposite of what I meant. " He did not elaborate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgardo David Holzman's debut novel, Malena (Nortia Press), opens in a smoky Buenos Aires cafe. A dashing army captain named Diego and his lover Inés are dancing to their favorite tango, "Malena. " Malena sings the tango like no one else and into each verse she pours her heart. Her voice is perfumed with the weeds of the slum. Malena feels the pain of the bandoneón. It's an intensely romantic scene - but it's also a scene filled with mortal dread.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Martin Vogl, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - Mali's interim president, who was beaten by a mob of demonstrators who broke into his office this week, has left the country to seek medical treatment in France, an adviser and two French government officials said Wednesday. The unexpected, and unpublicized, departure of 70-year-old Dioncounda Traore leaves a dangerous power vacuum in the West African nation, which was thrown off course after a March coup. Contacted by telephone, an adviser to Traore said the interim president had left Mali for France to undergo medical tests on his heart because he has had a previous heart attack.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
Israel detains pro-Palestinians JERUSALEM - Israel detained dozens of international activists as they landed at its main airport on Sunday, preventing them from entering the country to participate in a planned solidarity mission with Palestinians in the West Bank. Israel said the activists, part of an umbrella group called "Welcome to Palestine," were provocateurs who posed a security threat. Organizers said the event, meant to draw attention to travel restrictions on Palestinians, was nonviolent.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Rukmini Callimachi and Laura Burke, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - West Africa's regional bloc announced late Thursday that it was closing all land borders with Mali and freezing the nation's bank account in an effort to force mutinous soldiers from power who seized control in a coup last week. The financial sanctions are among the harshest imposed in recent years on a nation in West Africa and are likely to strangle impoverished Mali, which imports nearly all its gasoline from neighboring Ivory Coast. Kadre Desire Ouedraogo, president of the commission of the Economic Community of West African States, said in Ivory Coast that the sanctions would take effect in 72 hours.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
BEING A BIT of a contrarian (what, you're surprised?) I tend to approach Thanksgiving week in a slightly unorthodox way. Instead of tallying all those things that I'm grateful to have, I ruminate on those I don't. This is not to say that I engage in some Occupy Depression mentality, where I long for things that belong only to the 1 percent (including Demi Moore, Michael Moore and Ivana Get Moore). No, it's more of an attempt to remember why life is so good in my part of the world by thinking about how much worse it could be. For example, we don't have a Congress or president who seem to be able to get along on the most basic issues, including health care, the deficit, immigration and our military preparedness.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Law & Order: Buenos Aires , anyone? If The Secret in Their Eyes suggests an artier take on an especially good episode of the ubiquitous TV procedurals (with some Cold Case flashbacks thrown in), the resemblance is more than coincidence. Juan José Campanella, the writer and director of the Argentine thriller - winner of this year's Academy Award for foreign-language film - is a veteran of several Law & Order iterations. And so, this tale of the pursuit of a rapist and murderer, with its grim crime scenes and testy interrogations, its legal strategizing, and third-act twist, has a certain Criminal Intent intensity, a Special Victims Unit specialness about it. Starring a melancholic Ricardo Darín as Benjamin, a criminal court investigator, The Secret in Their Eyes opens with a gauzy reverie at a train station - a man and a woman separated by a departing choo-choo.
NEWS
June 14, 2003
What could two such distant countries as Africa's Democratic Republic of the Congo and Southeast Asia's Myanmar have in common? Both are nations writhing in distress, where human suffering and abuse of rights are the grossest domestic products. And the consequences of neglecting these situations much longer could be felt intimately in the United States. At stake are vital natural resources, the war on terror, and the depth of our nation's commitment to its ideals. President Bush should pay attention to these crises, and apply all the pressure he can to mitigate them.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The wife of the president of the Ivory Coast yesterday canceled her scheduled appearance at Deliverance Evangelistic Church in North Philadelphia after about 40 demonstrators gathered there to protest her husband's new administration, church officials said. Simone Ehivet Gbagbo, the wife of Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo, was to be the guest speaker at morning church services. She has been in the United States during the last week, meeting with federal officials in Washington on behalf of her husband.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For Ronald Reagan, the enemy was the Evil Empire. President Clinton has found evil in an assortment of enemies. Currently, there is the NATO campaign against Serbian forces in Yugoslavia. But in the last six years, the Clinton administration has launched military interventions in Haiti, Somalia, Iraq and Bosnia. It has fired missiles into Sudan and Afghanistan. During his trip to Africa last year, President Clinton also said he might have intervened in Rwanda had he been fully cognizant of the extent of the genocidal conflict there.
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