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Military Justice

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NEWS
December 8, 2004
We had just about become numb to frivolous, hair-brained lawsuits - until David Qualls raised his head from out of a foxhole. Qualls is one of eight active-duty National Guard soldiers who are mad that they must spend more time in the service than they bargained for. That's because in June the Pentagon initiated the "stop-loss" program, which can extend enlistments during national emergencies and war. About 7,000 soldiers have had their service...
NEWS
December 17, 2011 | By Pauline Jelinek and David Dishneau, ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT MEADE, Md. - His baby face aged by 19 months in detention, the young soldier blamed for the largest leak of classified material in American history appeared Friday for the first time in public at the start of a court-martial hearing that may hinge on whether the U.S. government overzealously stamped "secret" on material posing no national security risk. But the long-delayed military court case against Pfc. Bradley Manning, the accused source for the WikiLeaks website's trove of U.S. military and diplomatic secrets, got sidetracked by legal wrangling as soon as it began.
NEWS
May 26, 2006 | By Thomas Raleigh
"In war, truth is the first casualty. " - Aeschylus As often as commentators criticize the Bush administration for its failure to sufficiently shape the strategic conditions to succeed in Iraq, others criticize the media for failing to give proportionate attention to positive stories related to the war. Given the nature of the news business, this is unlikely to change. But there is another front in the information war that the military can affect. Instead of letting insurgents and al-Qaeda operatives exploit the rare lapses of U.S. soldiers - or make false accusations about lapses - to boost recruiting or turn public opinion against the coalition, the military needs to take control of this area of operations.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | By Jonathan Lurie
The subject of military justice once again has attracted the public's attention with the case of Air Force First Lt. Kelly Flinn, granted a general discharge in lieu of a court-martial. Military justice has been variously described as: a contradiction in terms; too important to be left solely to the military; a secretive and arcane process that's of limited interest to the American public; and a system supporting a structure of rank, ritual, tradition and discipline, wherein its participants can be ordered to their deaths.
NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By Scott L. Silliman
Upon taking office, President Obama immediately suspended the military commissions at Guantanamo Bay to give his administration time to determine the best system for trying detainees. Authorized by Congress in 2006, the military commissions had been criticized domestically and internationally for not protecting the rights of detainees and for being too politicized. Obama's suspension expires next week, and the administration still has not announced its plan. In my opinion, there are two possible options: trial in the federal criminal courts, or a revised military-commission system using court-martial rules.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By Drew Brown INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An Air Force colonel who accused President Bush of allowing the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to happen has set off a lively debate in military cyberspace over the limited rights that service people have to free speech. Lt. Col. Stephen L. Butler was relieved of his duties as vice chancellor for student affairs at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif., for his letter, published May 26 in the Monterey County Herald. Butler wrote that Bush knew the attacks would happen but "did nothing to warn the American people because he needed this war on terrorism" to save his presidency.
NEWS
April 20, 2013
By Patrick Meehan Imagine yourself a victim of sexual assault. After finally summoning the courage to speak out and report your attacker to authorities, you're forced to relive the attack through months of depositions, testimony, and questioning by defense attorneys hoping to discredit you. Next, a jury returns a guilty verdict against your attacker. But then, weeks later, that verdict is suddenly and irreversibly overturned, without any justification or rationale. Your attacker is set free, and you're not even told why. That's exactly what happened to an American woman working in Italy.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | By Richard Parker, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Army took the unusual step yesterday of ordering a retired two-star general to the equivalent of a grand jury proceeding for allegedly having affairs with the wives of four fellow officers and then lying about it. Retired Maj. Gen. David Hale was charged with 17 violations of military law, ranging from adultery to obstruction of justice. He is only the second top-ranking officer to face possible criminal action for adultery. Some observers say the move may be the beginning of the military's efforts to deal as harshly with top officers for adultery as with more junior personnel.
NEWS
October 19, 2004
AT WHAT POINT can a soldier disobey a direct order? Should commanding officers send men on suicide missions? Can the chain of command end up strangling the military? Every war brings with it moral conundrums and questions that test a nation's resolve and sense of justice, and the Iraq War is no exception. First, there was the torture of prisoners by U.S. troops in Abu Ghraib. Now we have soldiers disobeying orders during combat because they fear for their safety.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Mazin Yahya, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraq will take legal action to ensure justice for the families of 24 unarmed Iraqi civilians killed in a U.S. raid in Haditha seven years ago, a government spokesman said Thursday, after the lone U.S. Marine convicted in the killings reached a deal to escape jail time. Residents in Haditha, a former Sunni insurgent stronghold of about 85,000 people in the Euphrates River valley about 140 miles northwest of Baghdad, have expressed outrage at the American military justice system for allowing Staff Sgt. Frank Wuthrich to avoid prison.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An ambitious, bipartisan effort to overhaul the military justice system and stanch the increasing number of sexual assaults gained crucial support from conservatives Tuesday, setting up a showdown with the Pentagon's top brass. Sen. Rand Paul (R., Ky.) announced his backing for legislation sponsored by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D., N.Y.) that would remove commanders from the process of deciding whether serious crimes, including sexual misconduct cases, go to trial. That judgment would rest instead with seasoned trial lawyers who have prosecutorial experience and hold the rank of colonel or above.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
I HAVE ALWAYS been a Philadelphian. I was raised here, went to school here, graduated from George Washington High School in '91, attended College here. I felt this was the city I was going to raise my family in, but I am thinking more. The jobs here are either not hiring or offering low pay, the schools are closing and they are building more jails. The government in this state and city are failing us as a whole. I know that as a nation we are struggling, but this is ridiculous.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Richard Lardner and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Siding with the Pentagon's top brass, the Senate Armed Services Committee approved legislation Wednesday to keep commanders involved in deciding whether to prosecute sexual assault cases, rejecting an aggressive plan to stem sex-related crimes in the armed forces by overhauling the military justice system. By a vote of 17-9, the committee passed a bill crafted by its chairman, Sen. Carl Levin (D., Mich.), designed to increase pressure on senior commanders to prosecute sexual assault cases by requiring a top-level review if they fail to do so. Levin's proposal also makes it a crime to retaliate against victims who report a sexual assault and also calls on the Pentagon to relieve commanders who fail to create a climate receptive for victims.
NEWS
April 20, 2013
By Patrick Meehan Imagine yourself a victim of sexual assault. After finally summoning the courage to speak out and report your attacker to authorities, you're forced to relive the attack through months of depositions, testimony, and questioning by defense attorneys hoping to discredit you. Next, a jury returns a guilty verdict against your attacker. But then, weeks later, that verdict is suddenly and irreversibly overturned, without any justification or rationale. Your attacker is set free, and you're not even told why. That's exactly what happened to an American woman working in Italy.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Richard Lardner and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Victims of sexual assault and violence in the military told Congress on Wednesday they were afflicted with a slow and uncaring system of justice that too often fails to hold perpetrators accountable and is fraught with institutional bias. They testified to a Senate panel examining the military's handling of sexual assault cases that the military justice system is broken and urged Congress to make changes in the law that would stem the rape, sexual assault and sexual harassment that they said were pervasive in the service branches.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Helen Benedict
The Pentagon's announcement this week that it will lift the ban on women in ground combat positions is welcome news to many of those who value equal rights. But it is also an urgent reminder that sexual assault remains a blight on our armed forces that only constant, sincere efforts will erase. As a writer who has been interviewing female veterans for many years, I have long argued that lifting the ground combat ban would help military women win the respect they deserve. As long as women were officially prohibited from engaging in that essential act of a soldier - fighting - they were seen as second-class.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Mazin Yahya, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraq will take legal action to ensure justice for the families of 24 unarmed Iraqi civilians killed in a U.S. raid in Haditha seven years ago, a government spokesman said Thursday, after the lone U.S. Marine convicted in the killings reached a deal to escape jail time. Residents in Haditha, a former Sunni insurgent stronghold of about 85,000 people in the Euphrates River valley about 140 miles northwest of Baghdad, have expressed outrage at the American military justice system for allowing Staff Sgt. Frank Wuthrich to avoid prison.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | BY CHRIS HAWLEY, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Even before the Army sent him to Afghanistan, supporters say, Pvt. Daniel Chen was fighting a personal war. Fellow soldiers at a base in Georgia teased him about his Chinese name, crying out "Chen!" in an exaggerated Asian accent. They called him "Jackie Chen," a reference to the Hollywood action star Jackie Chan. People would ask him if he was Chinese, even though he was a native New Yorker. At one point Chen wrote in his diary that he was running out of jokes to respond with.
NEWS
December 17, 2011 | By Pauline Jelinek and David Dishneau, ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT MEADE, Md. - His baby face aged by 19 months in detention, the young soldier blamed for the largest leak of classified material in American history appeared Friday for the first time in public at the start of a court-martial hearing that may hinge on whether the U.S. government overzealously stamped "secret" on material posing no national security risk. But the long-delayed military court case against Pfc. Bradley Manning, the accused source for the WikiLeaks website's trove of U.S. military and diplomatic secrets, got sidetracked by legal wrangling as soon as it began.
NEWS
December 12, 2011
Payroll-tax cut is deceiving President Obama's latest effort to extend the payroll-tax cut is very deceiving ("A populist tack for Obama," Wednesday). The intent is to spur the economy and that is a good thing. However, who is going to pay for this in the long run as he continues to support legislation that kicks the real problem further down the road? The Social Security fund is rapidly decreasing and this will only escalate that trend. I am a senior citizen and probably will not be affected in the short term.
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