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NEWS
July 16, 2011
A 33-year-old Philadelphia man pleaded guilty Friday to a federal indictment charging him with bribing military officials in exchange for government contracts related to combat operations in Iraq, prosecutors said. Justin W. Lee, the former president of Lee Dynamics International, provided military contracting officials with cash, airline tickets, meals, hotel stays, spa visits, and jobs. The total value of the bribes was more than $1.2 million. In return, his company won contracts worth millions, including deals for the storage of weapons in Iraq.
NEWS
June 20, 2007
FATIMAH Ali's assertion in her recent op-ed ("Who's making money on education?") that retired military leaders have an inappropriate background for public-school systems could not be more wrong. The military retires more than 100 professionals a year with a rank of general or admiral. These individuals have in-depth experience leading large numbers of personnel and managing multimillion-dollar budgets, as well as a sharp focus on an end goal and a commitment to public service. The military is also one of the most accomplished teaching and learning organizations in the world.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Thursday reassured U.S. soldiers in Iraq that allowing gays to serve openly in the military would have little impact on the armed forces, an argument largely echoed by the top leaders of the Army, Air Force, Marines, and Navy. Visiting troops at Camp Liberty in Baghdad, Gates was asked when repeal of the 17-year-old policy commonly known as "don't ask, don't tell" would occur and what its effect would be. "My guess is you won't see much change at all because the whole thrust of the training is you're supposed to go on treating everybody like you're supposed to be treating everybody now, with dignity, respect, and discipline," Gates told the troops.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | By ACEL MOORE
Though I feel that former President Carter and his team made an agreement in good faith with the military junta in Haiti, considering the events of Tuesday night, the pact no longer has any validity. Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras and his murderous thugs should be put on a raft and pushed into the Caribbean - but not in the direction of the United States. Carter and his team of Sen. Sam Nunn and Gen. Colin Powell brokered the agreement on behalf of President Clinton and, in doing so, they probably prevented a lot of bloodshed if our forces had invaded.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here are highlights of the Haiti agreement: Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras and two other Haitian military leaders said they would step down after the Haitian parliament passed legislation granting them amnesty. If the parliament fails to act by Oct. 15, Cedras will step down anyway. Exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide will return to the island nation after the dictators step down. About 15,000 U.S. peace-keepers will begin moving into Haiti today. Cedras and the other military leaders are not required to leave the country.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Denise Devine, holder of numerous college degrees and 19 patents, is not a woman of simple ambitions. So it is not enough to describe her small-business objective as wanting to turn a profit. Far from it. She is out to change eating habits, combat childhood obesity, and, in the process, improve national security. If you think that last one is a delusional stretch, Devine refers you to "Mission: Readiness," a report issued in 2010 by more than 100 retired U.S. military leaders that found that 27 percent of Americans ages 17 to 24 were too fat to serve in the armed forces.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Helping History. Deteriorating Revolutionary War houses at Valley Forge National Historical Park will share $1.25 million in federal repair funds... Coup Cools. Military leaders who seized parliament in Fiji two months ago freed their last 18 hostages after striking a deal throwing out the nation's constitution and prime minister... Medical Machine. The Food and Drug Administration approved the first robotic device intended to perform surgery... Nuclear Knickknacks. Workers at a former weapons plant near Denver used nuclear bomb parts as candy dishes and paperweights, a government report said; the parts were not radioactive.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is eyeing plans to eliminate danger pay for service members in as many as 18 countries and five waterways around the world, saving about $120 million a year while taking a bite out of troops' salaries, The Associated Press has learned. Senior defense and military leaders are expected to meet later this week to review the matter and are poised to approve a new plan. Pentagon press secretary George Little declined to discuss details but said no final decisions have been made.
NEWS
January 27, 1993 | By JAY LUCAS and MARK KAPLAN
Military leaders are faced with some serious challenges to implement the inevitable policy change that will allow gays and lesbians to serve in the armed forces without fear of discharge. As soon as the homosexual ban is lifted, the challenge will shift to implementation - how they can effectively and smoothly integrate gays and lesbians. The Pentagon's concerns have revolved around the attitudes and potential behaviors of straight service people toward their gay and lesbian peers - and vice-versa.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United States should keep a residual force of about 10,000 in Afghanistan after combat forces leave at the end of 2014, the Senate Republican leader said Monday after a series of meetings with military leaders in the country. Sen. Mitch McConnell, who led a congressional delegation to Afghanistan and Israel, expressed optimism about an 11-year war that now stands as the longest in American history, and the prospect of Afghans assuming a lead role in the fighting. "My observation about Afghanistan at this point is this is the first time I've left there with a sense of optimism," he told reporters in a conference call.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is eyeing plans to eliminate danger pay for service members in as many as 18 countries and five waterways around the world, saving about $120 million a year while taking a bite out of troops' salaries, The Associated Press has learned. Senior defense and military leaders are expected to meet later this week to review the matter and are poised to approve a new plan. Pentagon press secretary George Little declined to discuss details but said no final decisions have been made.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Nedra Pickler, Associated Press
ANNAPOLIS, Md. - With a growing sexual assault epidemic staining the military, President Obama urged U.S. Naval Academy graduates Friday to remember their honor depends on what they do when nobody is looking and said the crime has "no place in the greatest military on earth. " The commander in chief congratulated the 1,047 midshipmen graduating at the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, telling the 841 men and 206 women that they have proven themselves morally by meeting rigorous standards at the academy.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Richard Lardner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Members of a House panel angry over the growing epidemic of sexual assaults in the military took a key step toward tackling the problem by passing legislation Wednesday that would strip commanding officers of their long-standing authority to unilaterally change or dismiss court-martial convictions in rape and assault cases. Lawmakers believe the revision will lead to a cultural shift and encourage victims to step forward. The legislation, which will be folded into a broader defense policy bill that the full House will consider in the coming weeks, also would impose harsher penalties on service members found guilty of sexual offenses by requiring that they be dismissed or dishonorably discharged.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Robert Burns and Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Thursday the nation's military leaders told him they were "ashamed" of their failure to end sexual abuse in the services. He pledged to "leave no stone unturned" in the effort to halt the abuse, which he said undermined the trust the military needed to be effective. Obama said he had asked Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Martin Dempsey to lead a process to root out the problem. "They care about this and they are angry about it," Obama said at the White House, after he summoned Hagel, Dempsey, and other top defense leaders to discuss a problem thrust to the fore by misconduct cases and a Pentagon report showing up to 26,000 military members may have been sexually assaulted last year.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Julie Pace and Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is expected to give Syrian rebels broader nonlethal military assistance, including body armor and night-vision goggles, while stopping short of providing weapons to forces fighting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The timing and scope of the stepped-up aid package is unclear. President Obama has not given final approval, and an announcement is not imminent, said a senior administration official, who requested anonymity because the official was not authorized to discuss the internal deliberations.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United States should keep a residual force of about 10,000 in Afghanistan after combat forces leave at the end of 2014, the Senate Republican leader said Monday after a series of meetings with military leaders in the country. Sen. Mitch McConnell, who led a congressional delegation to Afghanistan and Israel, expressed optimism about an 11-year war that now stands as the longest in American history, and the prospect of Afghans assuming a lead role in the fighting. "My observation about Afghanistan at this point is this is the first time I've left there with a sense of optimism," he told reporters in a conference call.
NEWS
August 21, 2012
'Yes, I will. " This is the unequivocal answer of Egypt's president Mohammed Morsi to the long-pending question of whether he is willing to show the military leaders that he is in charge of the country. Morsi gave his answer by firing the nation's defense minister, the army's chief of staff, and other military leaders. He was right to do so. On the one hand, the United States may not feel too comfortable about a president who is a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood. Of course, it is justified for foreign policy makers to be skeptical about an organization that holds a historic animosity toward America and Israel.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
CAIRO - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton used her first meeting with Egypt's new Islamist president to press Mohammed Morsi to start a dialogue with military leaders as a way of preserving the country's transition to democracy. Clinton voiced support for the "full transition" to civilian rule at a time when Morsi's backers are in a political standoff with the generals who have ruled since President Hosni Mubarak was ousted last year. Resolving the impasse "requires dialogue and compromise, real politics," Clinton said.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Automatic defense cuts looming in January would be more devastating than previously feared and make it impossible for President Obama to refocus his national security strategy, a bipartisan group of former lawmakers and retired military officers said Thursday. Members of the Bipartisan Policy Center painted a dire picture for the nation's economy, the military, and large and small defense contractors if the automatic reductions occur Jan. 2, 2013. Based on a special task force's calculations, the group said the cuts would mean an indiscriminate, across-the-board 15 percent reduction in programs and activities within the military, not the 10 percent that had been estimated.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Martin Vogl, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - Mali's interim president, who was beaten by a mob of demonstrators who broke into his office this week, has left the country to seek medical treatment in France, an adviser and two French government officials said Wednesday. The unexpected, and unpublicized, departure of 70-year-old Dioncounda Traore leaves a dangerous power vacuum in the West African nation, which was thrown off course after a March coup. Contacted by telephone, an adviser to Traore said the interim president had left Mali for France to undergo medical tests on his heart because he has had a previous heart attack.
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