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Military Life

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NEWS
June 7, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventeen-year-old John Owczarzak remembers his father reciting exciting stories about World War II. He also remembers watching his two older sisters scramble to get enough student loans to attend college. Both those memories made the recent Church Farm School graduate decide that after getting his high school diploma, he would join the Navy instead of going to college. "My father was in the Navy, and he'd tell me stories about when he was on shore duty. You know - going onto shore and breaking up fights in the bars, about his friends," Owczarzak said of his father, John.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A parade and Revolutionary War reenactments will be part of the festivities this weekend as the Valley Forge Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Council of American Revolutionary Sites continue the two-year program Patriots or Traitors in Warwick Township. The program covers a series of events meant to commemorate the battles fought in the Philadelphia area in 1777-78. At 10 a.m. Saturday, a parade will begin at the Warwick Township Administration Building at 1733 Township Greene and proceed to the Moland House, 1641 York Rd., where throughout the day reenactors will demonstrate military life of 1777.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Just before storming beaches in the South Pacific during World War II, Robert Christian remembers his superiors calling out: "Smoke 'em if you got 'em!" Christian, who had never used cigarettes before joining the Navy, became a heavy smoker. Now 71, he has emphysema and the government pays for his health treatment. Emmanuel Carreras, 34, recalls being given the option of either a smoking break or mopping the barracks at the end of a grueling day of Marine Corps basic training.
NEWS
November 6, 2006
JOHN KERRY'S slip of the tongue hit a nerve because we all know the requirements for enlistment have been lowered - the maximum age has been raised from 35 to 42, restrictions against high school dropouts relaxed and, out of sheer desperation, the Army has doubled the percentage of enlistees accepted from among the lowest-scoring tier of recruits (so-called Category IV). Recruits in Category IV are limited in the number of jobs they are qualified for, are hard to train and are more likely to have problems adjusting to military life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2011
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 19-year-old woman, hardworking and married to my best friend. Life is amazing! So what's my problem? I burn out of jobs quickly. I'll start a job and absolutely love it, but within six months the things that I once loved about the job start to drive me crazy. Within a year, I hate my job and put in my two weeks' notice. I have recently considered enlisting in the Air Force. (My husband is on active duty.) I am absolutely thrilled about it, but I'm afraid I'll eventually start hating my job and it's something I'll be stuck with.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | By Rachel Gouk
Saturday-Sunday Train and Toy Show At Greenberg's Train and Toy Show, which calls itself the world's largest traveling train and toy exhibition, families can see and learn about train layouts, gauges, and scales. How-to demonstrations and clinics are scheduled, including seminars on how to start a layout, developing scenery, and maintenance. Model and toy train experts will be at the Expo to explain exhibits. Scenery supplies, hobby tools, and how-to videos and publications will be for sale.
SPORTS
November 13, 2013 | By Paul Tierney, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many, Veterans Day was merely a day off. For others, it allowed for reflection upon the generations of Americans who have gone overseas to protect our nation's freedom. But for Union midfielder Danny Cruz, military holidays are consumed by one unrelenting fact. His father, Army Sgt. First Class Alejo Cruz Jr., who goes by Al, is in harm's way in Afghanistan. "It's something you think about every single day," Danny Cruz said. "But as time goes on, I try to understand that this is what my father is passionate about.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By John Lancaster, WASHINGTON POST
In opposing President Clinton's attempt to lift the ban on homosexuals in the armed forces, U.S. military officials have raised specters ranging from the threat of AIDS to invasions of privacy to the morale-busting spectacle of gay drill sergeants dancing cheek to cheek in noncommissioned officers clubs. The wide range of arguments reflects both the emotional nature of the issue and what senior military officers freely admit is a lack of hard evidence to buttress their case. Instead, they say, their opposition constitutes a mostly subjective judgment about gays and about the unique nature of military life, in particular those qualities that contribute to a cohesive and effective fighting force.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | by Douglas McGrath, From the New York Times
To: The President and appropriate Congressional committee heads From: The Joint Chiefs Subject: Top-Secret Report on Gays in the Military Purpose of study: In late January, President Clinton ordered the Pentagon to examine the feasibility of allowing open homosexuals in the armed forces. It was his contention that thousands of gay soldiers have performed excellent service in the past. Many military experts didn't like to hear this, especially Sen. Sam Nunn, who covered his ears and sang, "La la la la la la la!"
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
You have to give them stars for consistency. The military regularly manages to resolve matters of human relationships with the delicacy, the finesse, the sheer sensitivity of an assault vehicle on enemy terrain. This time, the Marine Corps looked deeply into the problems of young military marriages and came up with a family policy: No Family. Or at least no marriage. The edict came down from Marine Corps Commandant Carl Mundy that as of 1995, the Marines would be looking for a few good singles.
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NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* TRUE DETECTIVE. 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. * ENLISTED. 9:30 tonight, Fox 29.   IT'S NOT a bad thing that the whodunit sometimes takes a backseat to the who's-in-it in HBO's new drama "True Detective," which, as you might have heard, stars Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey. Because, while the naked body of a woman has been left in a field, trussed and posed and crowned with some twigs and a pair of antlers, we've seen this kind of thing before. ("Hannibal," anyone?
SPORTS
November 13, 2013 | By Paul Tierney, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many, Veterans Day was merely a day off. For others, it allowed for reflection upon the generations of Americans who have gone overseas to protect our nation's freedom. But for Union midfielder Danny Cruz, military holidays are consumed by one unrelenting fact. His father, Army Sgt. First Class Alejo Cruz Jr., who goes by Al, is in harm's way in Afghanistan. "It's something you think about every single day," Danny Cruz said. "But as time goes on, I try to understand that this is what my father is passionate about.
SPORTS
December 21, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
IKEAL JOHNSON has proved to be a focused and strong-willed young man during 4 years at Philadelphia Military Academy-Elverson. Know why he's there? 'Cause he couldn't get the best of his grandmom. Johnson already was showing basketball talents as an eighth-grader, and a charter high school with a high-profile program made a serious overture. Forget it, basically, was the message from Maxine Goodman. Two and threes, she figured, would not do as much for Ikeal's future as hup-two-three-four.
SPORTS
September 12, 2012 | By Emily Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
P.J. Byers sat in front of about three dozen reporters on Tuesday afternoon, his hands folded neatly on the table in front of him. His blond buzz cut glistened from the spotlight over his head. He was deliberate with his words and spoke in a soft monotone. As a scout-team fullback at Penn State, Byers is not used to speaking in front of the media. His career statstical line reads: One carry, 1 yard. But this is a special week for Byers. When the Nittany Lions face Navy on Saturday at Beaver Stadium, Byers will have more in common with his opponents than he does with most of his teammates.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Esterlina Wiest couldn't wait to become a student commander of the Air Force Junior ROTC program at Coatesville Area High School in the fall. The 17-year-old senior was eager to lead the squad that she credits with not only helping whip her into academic shape, but also supporting her when her grandfather was seriously ill. But unless a group of dedicated parents can raise $157,000 in less than a month, Wiest and almost 100 fellow cadets will...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2011
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 19-year-old woman, hardworking and married to my best friend. Life is amazing! So what's my problem? I burn out of jobs quickly. I'll start a job and absolutely love it, but within six months the things that I once loved about the job start to drive me crazy. Within a year, I hate my job and put in my two weeks' notice. I have recently considered enlisting in the Air Force. (My husband is on active duty.) I am absolutely thrilled about it, but I'm afraid I'll eventually start hating my job and it's something I'll be stuck with.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | By Rachel Gouk
Saturday-Sunday Train and Toy Show At Greenberg's Train and Toy Show, which calls itself the world's largest traveling train and toy exhibition, families can see and learn about train layouts, gauges, and scales. How-to demonstrations and clinics are scheduled, including seminars on how to start a layout, developing scenery, and maintenance. Model and toy train experts will be at the Expo to explain exhibits. Scenery supplies, hobby tools, and how-to videos and publications will be for sale.
NEWS
May 5, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before he came to own Westy's, a corner bar across the street from The Inquirer, Billy West enjoyed military life. He enjoyed it so much that the day after he was discharged from the Army in 1965, he joined the Navy, and was eventually sent to Vietnam. But after two years his ailing mother called him home to run the family business. Yesterday, his wife, Theresa, said he told her: "I never should have done that. I should have stayed. " William H. West died of a lung infection Thursday at Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
December 16, 2007 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The mounting excitement in the Haddonfield Middle School gymnasium suggested the arrival of a legendary rock star. But as students filled the bleachers and occupied the floor space, the buzz was directed toward a slender young woman in camouflage, blond hair pulled back in a no-nonsense bun. "There she is!" was the murmur on a recent Friday. The "she" in question smiled shyly as Haddonfield Mayor Tish Colombi introduced Sgt. Sarah Carroll, 29, a soldier on leave from Iraq and a school alumna.
NEWS
November 6, 2006
JOHN KERRY'S slip of the tongue hit a nerve because we all know the requirements for enlistment have been lowered - the maximum age has been raised from 35 to 42, restrictions against high school dropouts relaxed and, out of sheer desperation, the Army has doubled the percentage of enlistees accepted from among the lowest-scoring tier of recruits (so-called Category IV). Recruits in Category IV are limited in the number of jobs they are qualified for, are hard to train and are more likely to have problems adjusting to military life.
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