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NEWS
April 24, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
A bomb exploded today on a bus carrying U.S. military personnel in Athens, injuring seven servicemen, police said. The explosion occurred at 5:10 p.m. (10:10 a.m. EDT) near Athens' central market on a bus carrying 25 American military personnel and a Greek driver to Hellenikon Air Base, outside the city, police said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the explosion. The bus had been headed from a Greek military air base at Elefsina, 13 miles west of the Greek capital, to the U.S. base, which is in the Athens suburb of Glyfada.
SPORTS
August 16, 2011 | BY LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
BETHLEHEM - They filed past the tall, gaunt, old man in single file, most of the soldiers looking past him to the practice field ahead, where their clean, crisp uniforms were about to mingle with the muddy practice uniforms of the Eagles on Military Day at training camp. Every now and then, though, there was one who knew who the old man was, who would stop with an item to sign and a fervent wish to express, that the players of today were more like the white-haired fellow in the Pro Football Hall of Fame polo shirt, squinting through wire-rimmed glasses.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Adrienne Lu, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie returned to Haddon Heights on Monday to sign a package of legislation intended to honor active-duty and veteran military personnel. Christie signed three bills in an afternoon ceremony at the Honor Roll Memorial at Haddon Lake Park in the borough where he opened his campaign to become governor. A fourth measure, which he previously signed, renames a portion of Route 47 in Glassboro the South Jersey Vietnam Veterans' Highway. "Our state's servicemen, servicewomen, and their families have bravely and selflessly sacrificed in defense of our nation and our values," Christie said Monday in a written statement.
NEWS
September 25, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Military personnel who have been activated or reassigned because of the Sept. 11 terrorism will not have to make payments on federal college loans during their service, the Education Department said yesterday. Education Secretary Rod Paige also encouraged colleges and universities to provide either a refund of tuition or a comparable credit to students forced to withdraw from school for military service. Paige also urged colleges to offer flexible reenrollment options to returning soldiers and those otherwise affected by the attacks.
NEWS
September 4, 2010 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first thing Tatiana Simpson did after her boyfriend proposed to her in a phone call from Iraq was to log on to Facebook. "Right after it happened, I posted. I had to tell them," Simpson, 17, of Sewell, said of her social-networking friends. Simpson says the Facebook page Army Girlfriends: For All the Girls Waiting Back Home is her favorite among the forums she uses to connect with others who are dating members of the military. Simpson, who doesn't know anyone locally who is dating a service member, relies on the site for advice.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Centennial School District officials say someone owes them millions of dollars for 300 students who aren't theirs. Board members on Tuesday night approved billing the U.S. Department of Education and the Navy for the education of students who live in naval housing in Warminster, attend Centennial schools but whose parents work at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station in Horsham. According to school officials, because the parents are military personnel at Willow Grove, the children should be considered part of the Hatboro-Horsham School District.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal government is mounting a massive security operation to protect the Summer Olympics in Atlanta from any possible terrorist threat. The contingent will consist of about 2,500 federal law enforcement officers, 11,000 military personnel, and at least 1,000 additional federal employees, Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R., Utah) said while chairing a Judiciary Committee hearing yesterday in a room displaying an enlarged photo of a ski-masked terrorist from the 1972 Games in Munich, where 11 Israeli athletes were killed.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To make sure it has sufficient blood supply to treat American casualties in any combat in Afghanistan, the Pentagon may restrict the Red Cross and other civilian groups from collecting blood on military bases. The last time the Defense Department imposed such a restriction was during the 1991 Persian Gulf war. The restriction would help ensure that service personnel would be able to donate blood when it was needed to treat those wounded in combat. "We're trying to make sure there's a steady supply of blood available if we need it," said Army Col. Michael Fitzpatrick, director of the Armed Forces Blood Program Office.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Warning that "we are in a police hiring crisis," Police Commissioner John F. Timoney yesterday urged City Council to permit the Police Department to recruit active military personnel, even if they live outside Philadelphia. Timoney spoke before a Council committee on behalf of a bill introduced by Councilman James F. Kenney. It would make an exception in a longstanding ordinance requiring civil-service employees to live in Philadelphia for a year before they can be hired. The bill will be an early test of how well Timoney's reform agenda plays in Philadelphia's political arena.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | By Lauren Mayk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To commemorate Veterans' Day, military personnel on active duty will soon be receiving a bundle of letters postmarked from classrooms in New Jersey. About 540 Westampton Middle School students will pen letters of support to troops deployed as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. The letters will go out to men and women from the Burlington County area. Seventh-grade teacher JoAnn Donnelly proposed the letter-writing project to mark the Nov. 11 holiday after her cousin was deployed to an undisclosed location with the Air Force.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Nancy Sasson was cleaning out her late parents' house in Miami, digging through clothes in a closet, when she found a military medal on the floor. It was a Purple Heart, typically awarded to military personnel wounded or killed in combat. Wow , she thought, I had no idea my father had received a Purple Heart . Sasson turned the medal over in her hand, and realized she was wrong. On the back was engraved Irvin S. Grindrod . She didn't recognize the name. Maybe he had been a friend of her father during World War II. She began searching the Internet, and soon realized that Grindrod wasn't an old Army buddy, though he had been in the service.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Though most current and former military personnel use civilian health care, many medical offices aren't prepared for the needs of veterans, soldiers, and their families. The National Board of Medical Examiners in Philadelphia and members of the White House's Joining Forces initiative are working to fix that problem, starting with the next generation of physicians. The 17-member task force recently held several days of meetings here to decide what was most important for doctors to learn about military-related medical issues.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By David O'Reilly and Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writers
Joseph R. "Beau" Biden III, Delaware's former attorney general and Vice President Biden's son, was remembered Saturday as an uncommonly principled elected official and an exceptionally caring person. "He did in 46 years what most us couldn't do in 146 years," President Obama told the 1,000 who crowded into Wilmington's St. Anthony of Padua Roman Catholic Church for his funeral. Biden, who died May 30 of brain cancer, was a "consummate public servant," Obama said, "the kind our country was built on. " His sister Ashley praised him in her eulogy as a public servant and a devoted father, son, and brother who even as a boy "took on everyone else's worries" and "etched every fiber of our beings.
NEWS
June 4, 2015
ISSUE | EARLY LEARNING Investments pay off sooner, and later I was happy to see Gov. Wolf and law enforcement officials make the anticrime case for quality, early-childhood education ("Wolf: Invest in preschool, not prison," May 27). Members of the business community see another critical benefit: strengthening our economy and workforce. Research highlighted by the national business-leader group ReadyNation shows that investing in these programs yields up to $26,000 in net long-term economic benefits for every child served.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
WRIGHTSTOWN There were welcome signs of relief in this tiny South Jersey military community Thursday that the government shutdown was finally over. There was a steady stream of cars pulling into the Liberty gas station, beginning with the morning rush, about 6:45. By late afternoon, it was pretty much business as usual. At other businesses near the gate of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, there was a noticeable uptick with the return of federal civilian workers. "It was a tough three weeks.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Richard Lardner and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - With broad support from Republicans and Democrats, a House committee Wednesday approved legislation to tackle the growing problem of sexual assault in the armed forces by taking away the power of military commanders to overturn convictions in rape and assault cases. The bill passed by the House Armed Services Committee also requires that anyone found guilty of a sex-related crime receive a punishment that includes, at a minimum, a dismissal from military service or a dishonorable discharge.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Richard Lardner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The military's top uniformed leaders will seek to temper calls for a drastic overhaul of the military justice system as Congress demands fast answers to the growing epidemic of sexual assaults within the armed forces. Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the four-star officers atop each service are scheduled to testify Tuesday at a high-stakes Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on proposals that would trim the authority that American military commanders have to discipline the forces that they lead.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | BY JOHN MORITZ, Daily News Staff Writer moritzj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
MARY STRICKLER was eagerly awaiting the arrival yesterday of a Chihuahua named Trixie from Norfolk, Va., as the newest addition to her South Jersey home. Strickler, 72, of Westampton, Burlington County, and her mutt, Elvis, previously hosted two other Chihuahuas until their owners returned from military service. She is one of more than 30 Philadelphia-area volunteers who have offered to foster pets through PACT for Animals, a Montgomery County-based nonprofit that finds foster homes for pets of servicemen and women.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2005, the Air Force announced that it would begin phasing out the A-10 Thunderbolt planes that operated out of the Horsham Air Guard Station. Not long afterward, officials at the base began a years-long search for a mission to fill the void. The fruit of that search - a ground command center for military drones, announced this week - received a full airing Friday in a news conference at the base by a cadre of military personnel and elected officials. "We're very excited about this mission," said Col. Howard Eissler, commander for the 111th Fighter Wing, which will establish the project, adding that it would be an "enduring mission" that will generate about 250 jobs, 75 of them expected to be full-time.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 2005, the Air Force announced that it would begin phasing out the A-10 Thunderbolt planes that operated out of the Horsham Air Guard Station. Not long afterward, officials at the base began a years-long search for a mission to fill the void. The fruit of that search - a ground command center for military drones, announced this week - received a full airing Friday in a news conference at the base by a cadre of military personnel and elected officials. "We're very excited about this mission," said Col. Howard Eissler, commander for the 111th Fighter Wing, which will establish the project, adding that it would be an "enduring mission" that will generate about 250 jobs, 75 of them expected to be full-time.
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