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Military Personnel

NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Robert Burns and Alicia A. Caldwell, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Secret Service prostitution scandal grew Monday to include a 12th member of the U.S. military as the Pentagon suspended the security clearances of all the military personnel who have been implicated. The Secret Service has also taken action against 12 of its employees. Three Defense Department officials said the 12th military person involved was in Colombia in advance of President Obama's arrival for the Summit of the Americas and was assigned to the White House Communications Agency, a military unit that provides secure communications for the president.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. - Two Marines, including one from New Jersey, were killed in the crash of an MV-22 Osprey during a training exercise in Morocco on Wednesday. Cpl. Derek Kerns, of Fort Dix, N.J., and Cpl Robby Reyes, of Los Angeles, both were MV-22 crew chiefs based at Marine Air Station New River in Jacksonville. Reyes had joined the Marines in 2007. Kerns had joined a year later. The military said it would not identify two Marines injured in the crash. A Marine spokesman said earlier this week the Osprey, a tiltrotor aircraft, crashed in a training area southwest of Agadir, Morocco, after taking off from the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Nedra Pickler and Eric Tucker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A 29-year-old Moroccan man, who believed he was working with al-Qaeda, was arrested Friday near the U.S. Capitol as he was planning to detonate what he thought was a suicide vest, given to him by undercover operatives, said police and government officials. Amine El Khalifi of Alexandria, Va., was taken into custody with an inoperable gun and inert explosives, according to a counterterrorism official. He arrived near the Capitol in a van with the two undercover officers, and walked toward the building, according to court papers.
NEWS
February 18, 2012 | By Nedra Pickler and Eric Tucker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A 29-year-old Moroccan man, who believed he was working with al-Qaeda, was arrested Friday near the U.S. Capitol as he was planning to detonate what he thought was a suicide vest, given to him by undercover operatives, said police and government officials. Amine El Khalifi of Alexandria, Va., was taken into custody with an inoperable gun and inert explosives, according to a counterterrorism official. He arrived near the Capitol in a van with the two undercover officers, and walked toward the building, according to court papers.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. military personnel will go to North Korea in March to restart efforts to recover thousands of servicemen missing from the 1950-53 Korean War, the Defense Department said Thursday. The U.S. and North Korean militaries agreed last October to restart recovery operations in what was seen as a sign of easing tensions between the wartime enemies, but they did not announce a date. But a letter from Sen. Richard Lugar (R., Ind.) to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta notes that the agreement sets a March 1 start date.
NEWS
January 13, 2012
This week's 10th anniversary of the military detention of terror suspects at Guantánamo Bay was a fitting moment for protests by human-rights advocates worldwide. Yet those decrying the continued existence of a prison that's come to represent the worst excesses in the nation's antiterror campaign also included two-dozen retired generals and admirals. In urging President Obama to renew his push to shutter the prison, those military personnel rightly warned that America's "policy of holding detainees indefinitely, perhaps forever, without charge or trial, not only stands in the way of closing Guantánamo, but is insupportable in a nation of laws.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - House and Senate negotiators late Monday agreed to a sweeping $662 billion defense bill that requires military custody for terrorism suspects linked to al-Qaeda, including those captured within the United States, and indefinite detention without trial for some suspects. President Obama and his national-security team had appealed to lawmakers for last-minute changes to the bill to give the executive branch greater flexibility on whether to treat suspected terrorists as prisoners of war or criminals.
NEWS
November 20, 2011 | By Amir Shah and Rahim Faiez, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai received a resounding endorsement Saturday from a traditional national assembly to negotiate a security agreement that could keep a U.S. military presence in Afghanistan past 2014, when most international forces are to have left. The size of the force is subject to negotiations, but a future deal could keep thousands of U.S. troops there for years. The nonbinding resolution issued at the end of a Loya Jirga assembly also suggested some conditions for the talks between Afghan and American officials, including an end to unpopular night raids by military forces searching for insurgents.
NEWS
November 5, 2011
Drexel University professor Donald Bersoff, an expert on mental-health law, is the 2013 president of the American Psychological Association. Bersoff is a member of Drexel's psychology department and director of the program in law and psychology in the Earle Mack School of Law. He has a doctorate in psychology from New York University and a law degree from Yale University. He has a long history of leadership with the APA, which has 154,000 members. In a news release from the organization, Bersoff said his priorities would be serving the mental health needs of military personnel and their famlies, ensuring that psychologists were prepared to work with diverse clients, and attracting academicians and scientists to the field.
SPORTS
August 16, 2011 | BY LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
BETHLEHEM - They filed past the tall, gaunt, old man in single file, most of the soldiers looking past him to the practice field ahead, where their clean, crisp uniforms were about to mingle with the muddy practice uniforms of the Eagles on Military Day at training camp. Every now and then, though, there was one who knew who the old man was, who would stop with an item to sign and a fervent wish to express, that the players of today were more like the white-haired fellow in the Pro Football Hall of Fame polo shirt, squinting through wire-rimmed glasses.
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