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Military Police

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | By Jennifer Lin and Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU David Hess of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article. It also includes information from the Associated Press
President Clinton vowed that horrifying scenes of violence in Haiti's streets would not be replayed, as 1,000 U.S. military police landed yesterday in Port-au-Prince to restrain the local police. "Such violence cannot and will not be tolerated," Clinton said at the White House. His statement capped a day of furious damage control for the administration. In one small victory, exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide thanked Clinton and announced that he would return to Haiti on Oct. 15 - the same day Haiti's military rulers have promised to step down.
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're called the "in-lieu-ofs," for lack of a better name. They joined field artillery battalions in the Army National Guard and trained to fire the big guns. Soon, about 2,000 of these troops - some from Pennsylvania and New Jersey - will be packing M-16s for another mission: protecting convoys, checking route security, and directing traffic as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom. They will serve overseas in a few months in lieu of military police. MPs have become a precious resource in the Army, the mainstay for peacekeeping, occupation, stabilization and law enforcement.
NEWS
February 16, 2004 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The tiny village of "Citheron" was silent and seemingly deserted when a company of heavily armed American troops rushed in aboard humvees, then quickly began a house-to-house search. In minutes, staccato gunfire and shouting were heard inside building No. 7 - and a soldier and an enemy combatant lay on the floor, both "mortally wounded. " "We have a casualty in here - and an EPW [enemy prisoner of war]!" said Army National Guard Sgt. Dean Flyte, 38, of Bethlehem, Pa., as his comrade groaned and called out for help.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | Daily News wire services
RIO DE JANEIRO TOP COP FIRED OVER MASSACRE In Brazil, the state governor fired the head of a military police battalion that officials have blamed for the massacre of 21 shantytown residents. The firing yesterday came as Rio's poor fled in fear and about 300 children, shouting "justice" and "punishment," marched to protest Monday's machine gun and bomb attack by 30 black-hooded gunmen in Rio de Janeiro's Vigario Geral shantytown. Police did not intervene in the march.
NEWS
October 8, 1986 | By Lee Pasternack and Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
The son of a sergeant found stabbed to death in her Fort Dix quarters Monday was being held for psychiatric evaluation yesterday in connection with the slaying. Joel Jones, 19, had been scheduled for arraignment yesterday on first- degree murder charges in the slaying of Sandra A. Jones, but U.S. Magistrate Freda Wilson in Trenton postponed the proceeding until a 30-day psychiatric evaluation could be completed, post spokesmen said. The FBI said yesterday that no motive had been established in the slaying of Jones, 37, of Far Rockaway, N.Y., who died of multiple stab wounds.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | By Shankar Vedantam and Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Members of the 358th Civil Affairs Brigade in Norristown have been alerted for possible deployment in Haiti to help with rebuilding efforts after an invasion. "Only some of the people have been selected," said Walter Sokalski, a public affairs officer for the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. "This is the type of things they train for. " The orders to actually deploy the unit would come from the U.S. Atlantic Command in Virginia, he said. The brigade was among 10 Army National Guard and Army Reserve units called to support an invasion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
USMC Sgt. Javal Davis, a reservist assigned to Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, described the infamous fortress as "medieval," like "something from a Mad Max movie. " But as we know now, or think we do, what occurred at Abu Ghraib was no Mad Max action-adventure. It was real torture-porn. With the pictures to prove it. Now, here comes Errol Morris, the Oscar-winning documentarian of The Fog of War (about former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara and the Vietnam military action)
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Julie Watson, Associated Press
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. - The Marine Corps has created its first law enforcement battalions - a lean, specialized force of military police officers that it hopes can quickly deploy worldwide to help investigate crimes from terrorism to drug trafficking and train fledgling security forces in allied nations. The Corps activated three such battalions last month. Each is made up of roughly 500 military police officers and dozens of dogs. The Marine Corps has had police battalions off and on since World War II but they were primarily focused on providing security, such as accompanying fuel convoys or guarding generals on visits to dangerous areas, said Maj. Jan Durham, commander of the 1st Law Enforcement Battalion at Camp Pendleton.
NEWS
June 10, 2012
This slim young woman paid a heavy price for bringing a court case against the military after she and other activists were arrested and subjected to humiliating "virginity tests. " "I lost everything," she said, "my reputation and my job. " But she brought the case "because I want to stop these things from happening to other women. " A military court dismissed charges against the doctor who abused her, but Ibrahim is pursuing the case in international courts. She gets threatening phone messages — which she believes come from the military police — telling her she will die if she does not drop the issue.
NEWS
June 11, 2004 | By Shannon McCaffrey and Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush said yesterday that he ordered American troops to follow U.S. laws and international treaties banning torture while interrogating suspected terrorists, but he sidestepped a question about whether torture was ever justified. Bush also said he could not remember whether he had seen an advisory memo by a top Justice Department official that said torture was sometimes legally permissible in wartime, despite treaties such as the Geneva Conventions, which consider torture or inhumane treatment to be war crimes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand has been leading the charge against the sexual assault crisis in the military, which has been struggling to curb the culture that yielded 26,000 cases of "unwanted sexual contact" in the ranks last year. A champion of the bill that repealed the "don't ask, don't tell" policy, Gillibrand (D., N.Y.) has pushed welcome legislation to move decisions to prosecute sexual assault cases from the chain of command to independent military prosecutors. Unfortunately, despite bipartisan support, Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl Levin (D., Mich.)
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Robbie Corey-Boulet, Associated Press
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - The victims were rounded up at their homes, at work or while out having drinks. Taken without explanation to military camps overflowing with prisoners, they were deprived of food and beaten routinely with belts, clubs and guns and released only after their families paid substantial sums of money. A report issued Monday by New York-based Human Rights Watch accuses Ivory Coast's military of undertaking a swift, brutal, and illegal campaign of arbitrary arrest and detention in response to some of the most significant violence since last year's election crisis.
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - Suspected al-Qaeda suicide bombers disguised in military uniforms stormed into an army base in Yemen on Friday, killing 14 soldiers and wounding more than 20, Yemeni officials said. The dawn assault on the coastal base in Abyan province involved four suicide bombers in an army pickup truck laden with explosives and a gun battle with soldiers who were caught sleeping. The attack highlights the increasingly brazen tactics used by militants in this impoverished Arab Peninsula country and the many challenges Yemen's new leadership faces as it struggles, with U.S. help, to route militants and bring security to the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | Daily News Wire Services
LEE CHILD'S latest Jack Reacher novel, A Wanted Man: A Jack Reacher Novel (Delacorte, $28), offers fans some solace after the vexing news that Tom Cruise will play Child's imposing hero in a film version due out later this year. The casting of Cruise - who stands nowhere near Reacher's 6-foot-5 and doesn't exactly look like a former military police officer who can kill bad guys with his bare hands - angered purists, who perhaps had a taller, broader, less-movie-star-handsome Reacher in mind.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Hamza Hendawi and Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's president fired his intelligence chief on Wednesday for failing to act on an Israeli warning of an imminent attack days before extremists stormed a border post in the Sinai Peninsula and killed 16 soldiers. The dismissal, which followed Egyptian air strikes against Sinai extremists, also marked a bold attempt by the Islamist leader to deflect popular anger over the attack. It pointed to a surprising level of cooperation with the powerful military leaders who stripped the presidency of significant powers just before Mohammed Morsi took office June 30. In a major shake-up, Morsi also asked Defense Minister Hussein Tantawi to replace the commander of the military police, a force that has been heavily used to combat street protests since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak 18 months ago. Rights activists have accused the military police of brutality against protesters.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Julie Watson, Associated Press
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. - The Marine Corps has created its first law enforcement battalions - a lean, specialized force of military police officers that it hopes can quickly deploy worldwide to help investigate crimes from terrorism to drug trafficking and train fledgling security forces in allied nations. The Corps activated three such battalions last month. Each is made up of roughly 500 military police officers and dozens of dogs. The Marine Corps has had police battalions off and on since World War II but they were primarily focused on providing security, such as accompanying fuel convoys or guarding generals on visits to dangerous areas, said Maj. Jan Durham, commander of the 1st Law Enforcement Battalion at Camp Pendleton.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Pakistanis protest NATO's access ISLAMABAD - Thousands of followers of leading Islamist clerics began marching Sunday from the eastern city of Lahore to the capital, Islamabad, to protest Pakistan's decision to once again let NATO move Afghanistan-bound supply convoys through the country after a seven-month hiatus. The protest was organized by the Defense of Pakistan Council, a coalition of hard-line religious groups that has among its leaders Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, an Islamic cleric who India claims engineered the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai that killed 166 people.
NEWS
June 10, 2012
This slim young woman paid a heavy price for bringing a court case against the military after she and other activists were arrested and subjected to humiliating "virginity tests. " "I lost everything," she said, "my reputation and my job. " But she brought the case "because I want to stop these things from happening to other women. " A military court dismissed charges against the doctor who abused her, but Ibrahim is pursuing the case in international courts. She gets threatening phone messages — which she believes come from the military police — telling her she will die if she does not drop the issue.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's only Kyleigh Cheyenne Stich's first Christmas, but whatever gifts the years to come place under her tree, it's unlikely any will come close to 2011. Eleven-month-old Kyleigh, of Levittown, got the best present a little girl could hope for: Her dad. Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Stich Jr. was one of 15 National Guard airmen flown home Tuesday in time for the holidays. Members of the 108th Security Forces Squadron stationed in Iraq since July, the airmen were reunited with their families at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in two separate arrivals.
NEWS
December 17, 2011 | By David D. Kirkpatrick, New York Times News Service
CAIRO - Egypt's military rulers suffered a major embarrassment on Friday when a new civilian advisory council designed to bolster their legitimacy suspended its operations in protest over the military's deadly but ineffective treatment of peaceful demonstrators. The advisory council's decision followed a renewed outbreak of violence both in the center of Cairo on Friday and at vote-counting centers around the country the previous night. Election monitors said the violence threatened to undermine the credibility of Egypt's first parliamentary election since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak 10 months ago. The clashes at the vote-counting centers began after polls closed late Thursday, when soldiers beat up judges and other civilians trying to enter the centers.
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