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NEWS
November 23, 2005
AFTER SPENDING more than three years in prison without charges and being called a terrorist by the president, Jose Padilla can now enjoy the presumption of innocence all Americans have when they have been charged with a crime. Facing a Supreme Court that might have taken a dim view of citizens being held in prison for years without formal charges, the attorney general's office yesterday suddenly declared that Padilla was no longer an "enemy combatant," stripped of his constitutional rights at the whim of the White House, and would be transferred from a military prison to a federal one. Padilla will now face charges that he was part of a conspiracy to murder, kidnap and maim people abroad and provide material aid to terrorists.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Anne Gearan and Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence officials acknowledged Tuesday that the United States may release several Afghan Taliban prisoners from the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as an incentive to bring the Taliban to peace talks. Meanwhile, Afghan officials told the Associated Press that a plan to give Afghanistan a form of legal custody over the men if they are released satisfied their earlier objection to sending the prisoners to a third country. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper told Congress on Tuesday that no decision had been made on whether to trade the five Taliban prisoners, now held at Guantanamo as part of nascent peace talks with the Taliban.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Chris Grygiel and Mike Baker, Associated Press
SEATTLE - The attorney for the U.S. soldier accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians said Friday that the U.S. government was "hiding evidence" from the defense team. John Henry Browne said members of the defense team in Afghanistan were told they would have access to witnesses at a hospital, but later discovered the people had been released. He also said the U.S. government has not turned over files to the lawyers defending Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. The defense team said in a statement the prosecution was withholding information "while potential witnesses scatter.
NEWS
May 19, 2001 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A veteran officer at McGuire Air Force Base was sentenced this week to 40 years in military prison after he pleaded guilty to a host of charges that included the rape and sodomy of a 6-year-old girl who played on a soccer team he coached. Staff Sgt. Julian Latorre, 31, a 12-year veteran of the Air Force who lived on the Burlington County base with his wife and two children, had a two-day court martial at McGuire that began Tuesday. The victim's mother and her father - who serves in active duty at McGuire - were present at the two-day hearing along with Latorre's mother, father and sister.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Rahim Faiez and Anne Gearan, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Five top Taliban leaders held by the United States in the Guantanamo Bay military prison told a visiting Afghan delegation they agree to a proposed transfer to the tiny Persian Gulf state of Qatar, opening the door for a possible move aimed at bringing the Taliban into peace talks, Afghan officials said Saturday. The United States is considering transferring the five from the prison in Cuba to a presumably less restrictive custody in Qatar as an incentive for the Taliban to enter negotiations - though Washington has not yet outright agreed to the step, and some in Congress oppose it. Talks with the Taliban are seen as key to bringing some level of calm to Afghanistan, allowing U.S. troops to come home without the country descending into further chaos.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The CIA reports that when it waterboarded Abu Zubaydah, he squealed, giving the United States crucial information that defused several deadly terrorist plots. This gives rise to what is often cited as the central moral riddle of the terrorist age: Even if you think torture is wrong, would you sanction the torture of someone certain to have information about deadly attacks? Jack Bauer, of course, says yes. But here's another question - Is that really the question? What if the tactics being used are far worse than waterboarding, and what if some of the people being tortured are demonstrably innocent?
NEWS
August 8, 2007 | Daily News wire services
4 GIs, British soldier killed as Iraq death rate climbs BAGHDAD - Four more U.S. troops and a British soldier have died in attacks, military officials said yesterday, in a possible sign that extremists are regrouping after a drop in GI deaths last month. The spate of recent American deaths - 19 so far in August - seems certain to intensify the debate over U.S. progress to calm Iraq and gain ground against militants ahead of a key September report to Congress. U.S. deaths had dropped slightly in July to 79 - the lowest monthly tally since 70 were killed in November.
NEWS
June 14, 2002
U.S. detention of the accused 'dirty bomber' When I was in elementary school, I learned that one of the things that set America apart from dictatorships was that our government could, under no circumstances, detain an American citizen without access to counsel and without providing a fair, public trial before a jury. But now, Abdullah al Muhajir, an American citizen, is to be detained indefinitely (Inquirer, June 12), with no charges lodged against him, and deprived of access to counsel.
NEWS
August 24, 2004 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A military judge who is hearing cases of alleged abuse of prisoners at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison yesterday ordered prosecutors to speed up their work. Also, relatives said Staff Sgt. Ivan "Chip" Frederick would plead guilty today to some of the charges against him relating to the scandal. "We were expecting this to happen, because at the beginning we said he was willing to take his licks for anything that he had done, and that time has now come," said Bill Lawson, Frederick's uncle.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | By Gene Johnson and John Milburn, Associated Press
FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. - The lawyer for the Army staff sergeant accused of slaughtering 16 Afghan civilians in a night-time shooting rampage met his client for the first time Monday and said the soldier had a sketchy memory of the massacre. Lawyer John Henry Browne said Robert Bales remembered some details from before and after the killings, but little during the time the military believes he went on a killing spree through two Afghan villages. "He has some memory of some things that happened that night.
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NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Steven Rea
Lockout represents something new for Guy Pearce. And something old. New: In the Luc Besson-produced, sci-fi/prison-break/?space-rescue thriller, the Australian actor is a hard-boiled, against-the-grain antihero. He's the kind of guy who insults the mother of the mug who's tied him to a chair and is busy thrashing him to bits. In the face of great bodily harm, he spits out a snappy wisecrack or two. Old: see above. "It's absolutely out of an old Hollywood tradition," says Pearce about his tough-guy, Humphrey Bogart/Bruce Willis sort of role.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Chris Grygiel and Mike Baker, Associated Press
SEATTLE - The attorney for the U.S. soldier accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians said Friday that the U.S. government was "hiding evidence" from the defense team. John Henry Browne said members of the defense team in Afghanistan were told they would have access to witnesses at a hospital, but later discovered the people had been released. He also said the U.S. government has not turned over files to the lawyers defending Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. The defense team said in a statement the prosecution was withholding information "while potential witnesses scatter.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | By Gene Johnson and John Milburn, Associated Press
FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. - The lawyer for the Army staff sergeant accused of slaughtering 16 Afghan civilians in a night-time shooting rampage met his client for the first time Monday and said the soldier had a sketchy memory of the massacre. Lawyer John Henry Browne said Robert Bales remembered some details from before and after the killings, but little during the time the military believes he went on a killing spree through two Afghan villages. "He has some memory of some things that happened that night.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Rahim Faiez and Anne Gearan, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Five top Taliban leaders held by the United States in the Guantanamo Bay military prison told a visiting Afghan delegation they agree to a proposed transfer to the tiny Persian Gulf state of Qatar, opening the door for a possible move aimed at bringing the Taliban into peace talks, Afghan officials said Saturday. The United States is considering transferring the five from the prison in Cuba to a presumably less restrictive custody in Qatar as an incentive for the Taliban to enter negotiations - though Washington has not yet outright agreed to the step, and some in Congress oppose it. Talks with the Taliban are seen as key to bringing some level of calm to Afghanistan, allowing U.S. troops to come home without the country descending into further chaos.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Anne Gearan and Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence officials acknowledged Tuesday that the United States may release several Afghan Taliban prisoners from the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as an incentive to bring the Taliban to peace talks. Meanwhile, Afghan officials told the Associated Press that a plan to give Afghanistan a form of legal custody over the men if they are released satisfied their earlier objection to sending the prisoners to a third country. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper told Congress on Tuesday that no decision had been made on whether to trade the five Taliban prisoners, now held at Guantanamo as part of nascent peace talks with the Taliban.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The CIA reports that when it waterboarded Abu Zubaydah, he squealed, giving the United States crucial information that defused several deadly terrorist plots. This gives rise to what is often cited as the central moral riddle of the terrorist age: Even if you think torture is wrong, would you sanction the torture of someone certain to have information about deadly attacks? Jack Bauer, of course, says yes. But here's another question - Is that really the question? What if the tactics being used are far worse than waterboarding, and what if some of the people being tortured are demonstrably innocent?
NEWS
August 8, 2007 | Daily News wire services
4 GIs, British soldier killed as Iraq death rate climbs BAGHDAD - Four more U.S. troops and a British soldier have died in attacks, military officials said yesterday, in a possible sign that extremists are regrouping after a drop in GI deaths last month. The spate of recent American deaths - 19 so far in August - seems certain to intensify the debate over U.S. progress to calm Iraq and gain ground against militants ahead of a key September report to Congress. U.S. deaths had dropped slightly in July to 79 - the lowest monthly tally since 70 were killed in November.
NEWS
November 23, 2005
AFTER SPENDING more than three years in prison without charges and being called a terrorist by the president, Jose Padilla can now enjoy the presumption of innocence all Americans have when they have been charged with a crime. Facing a Supreme Court that might have taken a dim view of citizens being held in prison for years without formal charges, the attorney general's office yesterday suddenly declared that Padilla was no longer an "enemy combatant," stripped of his constitutional rights at the whim of the White House, and would be transferred from a military prison to a federal one. Padilla will now face charges that he was part of a conspiracy to murder, kidnap and maim people abroad and provide material aid to terrorists.
NEWS
August 24, 2004 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A military judge who is hearing cases of alleged abuse of prisoners at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison yesterday ordered prosecutors to speed up their work. Also, relatives said Staff Sgt. Ivan "Chip" Frederick would plead guilty today to some of the charges against him relating to the scandal. "We were expecting this to happen, because at the beginning we said he was willing to take his licks for anything that he had done, and that time has now come," said Bill Lawson, Frederick's uncle.
NEWS
June 24, 2003 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush yesterday ordered a Qatari man in U.S. custody to be designated an enemy combatant for allegedly helping al-Qaeda sleeper cells prepare for possible new attacks on the United States. Ali Saleh Kahlah al Marri, 37, a graduate student at Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., is the first person charged in the war on terrorism to be moved from the criminal system into military custody. The transfer strips him of several basic constitutional rights, including access to a lawyer and the ability to challenge his detention.
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