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NEWS
January 18, 1996 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
State Attorney General Thomas W. Corbett Jr. came under fire yesterday for endorsing a legal brief supporting the exclusion of women at the Virginia Military Institute. Whether VMI should remain all-male was argued yesterday before the U.S. Supreme Court. The federal government has sued the Commonwealth of Virginia to force gender integration at the 156-year-old state school. The American Civil Liberties Union and the Women's Law Project joined forces to condemn Corbett's support of a Dec. 15 brief written for the states of Pennsylvania and Wyoming by a Virginia attorney.
NEWS
May 10, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the first time in its 66-year history, Valley Forge Military Academy will admit day students this fall. The move comes in response to enrollment at the all-male boarding school, which currently has its highest enrollment in 20 years, said Garry F. Vance, director of admissions. "Since 1990, we have been at capacity," Vance said. "We added 30 more beds this year. For 1994-95, there will be 762 students in the academy and college, and we'll have a waiting list. There's no room to grow.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
While Valley Forge Military Academy may not legally throw its money or official endorsement behind political candidates, the school can, nevertheless, bestow with great fanfare its highest award on a man who just happens to be running for president of the United States. Escorted by uniformed cadets, with a cavalry regiment and junior military band in the background, Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) yesterday received the academy's 23d annual Bob Hope Five-Star Award for Distinguished Service to the United States of America.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Carl Brooks, Josh Powe, Morgan Boyle and James Troilo are making history at Valley Forge Military Academy. The seventh graders are part of a pilot program for day students at the academy. They are the four students in the program, the first of its kind in the academy's 66-year history. "We were one of the few military schools that did not have a day program," said retired Rear Adm. Virgil L. Hill Jr., president of the academy. "The pilot program for seventh graders is being integrated with the boarding school students.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Considering the event, Stan Wojtusik had a choice seat - at a table right underneath the formal portrait of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Philadelphia resident was having appetizers before dinner Jan. 15 in Eisenhower Hall at Valley Forge Military Academy and College with companions George Linthicum of Broomall, John Bowen of Silver Spring, Md., and Frank Walsh of Galloway, Ohio. The World War II veterans were attending a weekend "Forge of Freedom" symposium titled "Eisenhower: The Irreplaceable Commander," sponsored by the school and the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Charles Pope of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
The Army is considering stripping the privileged status of a half-dozen private military colleges by denying their graduates preference for active-duty officer jobs. The Pentagon, military school officials and members of Congress said the Army was considering the change. School officials said it could damage the prestige and traditions of their institutions, and seriously hurt recruiting. The Citadel, in South Carolina, and the Virginia Military Institute would be among the schools affected.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1975, 18-year-old Tony McIntyre lost a chance to go to Virginia Military Institute when a family tragedy made affording the school impossible. Five days later, McIntyre was offered a partial football scholarship to Marine Military Academy in Southern Texas. He still couldn't afford to go. Then a businessman gave McIntyre the last $1,000 he needed. Today McIntyre, 40, is a Medford resident, an executive at the Graham Co. in Philadelphia, a married man and a father of two. In part, McIntyre said, he credits his successes to the discipline and training he received during his one year of college-preparatory courses at Marine.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | Harrisonburg Daily News-Record / ALLEN LITTEN
Camellia Fries (left), 14, and Stephanie Fries, 12, go to court in Harrisonburg, Va. Stephanie was convicted Wednesday of helping her sister and boyfriend kill their mother the night before the girls were to start military school. Stephanie's boyfriend and Camellia were earlier convicted of first- degree murder.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By Marlene A. Prost, Special to The Inquirer
The youth had been thrown out of more than a few schools, including a military school, by the time he enrolled, in 1963, in Manor-Hall School of the Devereux Foundation. But this time would be different for the tough, undisciplined boy from a broken home in Northeast Philadelphia. First, the 15-year-old started using the name Michael; he was sick of being called "Sylvester the Cat" Stallone. Then Michael Sylvester Stallone, who was slight in stature, began working out and went out for football, track and other sports.
NEWS
December 27, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
M. John H. Wansink, 78, of Malvern, a retired company vice president, died of cancer last Thursday at home. A native of the Netherlands, Mr. Wansink graduated from military school and served six years as an officer in the Royal Dutch Army. In 1955, he married Ada van't Hoog. He was discharged that year from the army, and the couple immigrated to the United States. They had only a suitcase and had borrowed money for traveling expenses, said their son, John, but carried with them a sense of adventure.
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NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fallout from a cheating scandal in the Philadelphia School District continues. Three retired teachers surrendered their professional credentials last month for allegedly engaging in "multiple PSSA testing violations" related to Pennsylvania's system of standardized tests, according to the state Department of Education. Information posted on the department's website Wednesday identified the three as Alene S. Goldstein, Deborah L. Edwards-Dillard, and Phyllis R. Patselas. All three agreed to never seek jobs at a public school, charter school, or cyber school, or with a contracted educational provider.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state Department of Education has forced a former principal at Philadelphia Military Academy and a one-time teacher at John Welsh Elementary to surrender their professional credentials in connection with a test-cheating scandal involving the School District of Philadelphia. The credentials were surrendered last month, and the disciplinary actions were posted Tuesday on the department's website. The department alleges that as principal at the military school, Robert L. Manning violated the integrity and security of the state's standardized tests by failing "to investigate and report allegations of testing improprieties . . .," and attempted to hinder a subsequent investigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It can't be easy for sci-fi filmmakers to work in the shadows of such classics as 2001: A Space Odyssey or, for that matter, Alien . Two new films try, with mixed success. The latest masterpiece from acclaimed director Alfonso Cuarón ( Children of Men , Y Tu Mamá También ), Gravity is a tense two-character drama that has been nominated for 10 Academy Awards. It stars Sandra Bullock and George Clooney as the sole survivors of a disastrous explosion that wipes out the crew of a space shuttle who were assigned to make repairs to the Hubble Space Telescope.
SPORTS
January 10, 2013 | By Rick O, Inquirer Columnist
Before making two visits to Annapolis, Mike Brown had doubts about the U.S. Naval Academy's being the right fit for him. "Initially, the idea of going to a military school was kind of foreign to me," the Hatboro-Horsham senior said. "But I fell in love with the school, the coaches, and the players when I went down there. I saw it as a great opportunity. " Brown, a 6-foot-4, 193-pound swingman and third-year starter for the Hatters, committed to Navy, guided by second-year coach Ed DeChellis, in October.
NEWS
December 22, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
A shouting and chanting crowd of hundreds told officials Thursday night exactly what they thought of a Philadelphia School District plan to close 37 schools and change grades and shut programs at dozens more. "SOS! Save our schools!" hundreds yelled as they marched up North Broad Street toward district headquarters. "Whose city? Our city! Whose schools? Our schools!" It was a dramatic stand against the planned closings of one in six city schools, announced last week. Closings were not on the agenda of the School Reform Commission's voting meeting, but they quickly became the hot potato of the evening, with students, teachers, parents, and community members demanding answers.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Barbara Surk, Associated Press
BEIRUT - An Islamist faction of Syrian rebels captured an infantry base in the northern city of Aleppo, its fighters said Sunday, as forces fighting to topple President Bashar al-Assad advanced on the country's largest city. Also Sunday, Syrian warplanes blasted a Palestinian refugee camp near Damascus, killing eight people and wounding dozens, activists said. Some Palestinian groups in the Yarmouk camp have been backing Assad's regime. The infantry base was the second major army installation taken by rebels in a week in Aleppo.
NEWS
September 29, 2012
Republican Mitt Romney plans a lucrative breakfast in Philadelphia on Friday, hitting the Union League for a series of receptions that organizers expect will generate from $3.5 million to $4 million for his campaign. Afterward, Romney is scheduled to appear at a GOP rally at Valley Forge Military Academy and College in Wayne, amid speculation that Pennsylvania may have fallen off his campaign's target list of winnable battleground states. The Southeastern Pennsylvania swing is Romney's first visit to the state since July 17, when he held a rally in Westmoreland County and a fund-raiser in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
Republican Mitt Romney plans a lucrative breakfast in Philadelphia on Friday, hitting the Union League in Center City for a series of receptions that organizers expect will generate $3.5 million to $4 million for his campaign. Afterward, Romney is scheduled to appear at a GOP rally at the Valley Forge Military Academy and College in suburban Wayne, amid speculation that Pennsylvania may have fallen off his campaign's target list of winnable battleground states. The southeastern Pennsylvania swing is Romney's first visit to the state since July 17, when he held a rally in Westmoreland County and a fund-raiser in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Lynn Elber| and Bob Thomas, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Film producer Richard Zanuck, 77, who won the best picture Oscar for Driving Miss Daisy and was involved in such blockbuster films as Jaws and The Sting after his father, Hollywood mogul Darryl F. Zanuck, fired him from 20th Century Fox, died Friday. Mr. Zanuck's publicist said that he died of a heart attack at his Beverly Hills home. Mr. Zanuck's run of successes as an independent producer rivaled the achievements of his legendary father who reigned over 20th Century Fox from the 1930s until age and changing audience tastes brought him down.
NEWS
April 23, 2009 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A long-simmering feud between a small group of alumni and the administration of Valley Forge Military Academy and College has erupted into a major battle as both sides hurl allegations and threaten legal action. After three years of attempting to take their complaints to the school's trustees, the alumni group, known as the Valley Forge Old Guard, plans to call on the state attorney general to investigate the nonprofit that runs the school. In letters scheduled to be delivered tomorrow to Gov. Rendell, Attorney General Tom Corbett, and other state officials, the group charges that top administrators and the board of trustees are mismanaging private and state funds.
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