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Military Service

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NEWS
February 11, 2004 | By ELMER SMITH
I'LL ADMIT I was a little ticked off watching President Bush step from the cockpit of a Navy fighter plane into a waiting photo-op last May. Just didn't seem right to me that the commander-in-chief would schlock up a war he got us into just to create a more commanding image for himself. I did remember seeing him posed perfectly to look like the fifth great head on Mount Rushmore. And if anyone was surprised by his "surprise" visit to the troops on Thanksgiving they haven't been paying attention to the greatest media manipulator since JFK. That was just politics and I ain't mad at him for being better at it than almost anyone.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
I must disagree with the letter writer (Aug. 12) who said it was illegitimate to ask presidential candidate Mitt Romney about the military service of his sons. The question is essential to ask any Republican or Democrat who continues to support and fund the Iraq war. It is as relevant as a fifth deployment, a stop-loss order, a crushed limb or the casualty officer's knock on the door. It is the question that should be asked of everyone who is not actively working to end this nightmare war: If you support the war and think that soldiers should continue to be sent to their deaths and dismemberment, then which young one whom you love are you willing to place on the altar of Iraq?
NEWS
January 12, 2004 | By Dana Hull INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Wherever he goes, retired Army Gen. Wesley Clark is asked: If your military career was so great, why were you relieved early of your NATO command? What did Gen. Hugh Shelton really mean when he said that it happened because of "character and integrity issues"? Clark's 34-year military career is at the heart of his bid for the Democratic nomination, but differing perceptions of that career shadow his campaign. The Republican National Committee has "research" about the Democratic candidates on its Web site.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By JOSH FERNANDEZ, fernanj@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Up to 90 percent of young adults in Philadelphia can't join the military because they're undereducated, too physically unfit or have serious criminal records, a recent study found. The study, conducted by the nonprofit Mission: Readiness, said that the percentage of 17 to 24-year-olds ineligible for miltary service was worse here than the estimated 75 percent who are unfit nationwide. District Attorney Seth Williams and others said at a news conference yesterday that funding for early-learning programs would be a good way of battling the problem.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Deborah Sampson Gannett - alias Robert Shirtliffe - disguised herself as a man to sneak into the Continental Army during the American Revolution. Now, more than 200 years later, her service won't be a secret. It will be celebrated. Today, ground will be broken at Arlington National Cemetery for the first major memorial to honor the 1.8 million women who have served in the U.S. armed forces. A platoon of dignitaries, including President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, are to attend.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Like a boy discovering that the neighborhood bully has a glass jaw, Chuck Robb shyly admits that maybe getting provoked and deciding not to take it any longer is not such a bad thing after all. "It obviously touched a nerve," Robb says in his office in the Russell Senate Office Building. "It probably brought me out swinging a little bit earlier than I had planned. " For the umpteenth time - in a political rumble so personal that "you liar" has become a morning salutation - Virginia Sen. Charles S. Robb had taken a hit from his Republican adversary, Oliver L. North.
NEWS
March 17, 1993 | By Mark Thompson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Listen to the voices of the people fighting President Clinton's plan to allow openly gay men and women in the military and you will hear an escalating, alarming note about the spread and cost of AIDS. But gay advocates, and some medical experts, say the dire projections are based on faulty assumptions: that gays will flood recruiting offices if the ban is dropped, and that, once in the service, they will contract the disease at very high rates. "Homosexual young men will seek out military service for two reasons: to be where the boys are, and to locate a safe haven where all medical services are both competent and free for life," said Robert Spiro, a former undersecretary of the Army who last week released a report predicting a sharp increase in AIDS in the military if the ban is lifted.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
AS LAST SATURDAY turned into Sunday in the back room of a dimly lit Center City gay nightspot, a pianist's fingers danced across the keys while dozens of men and a few women joined together in song. Hours earlier, Congress had voted to repeal the controversial "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy that, for 17 years, had banned openly gay and lesbian soldiers from military service, and a celebratory mood was in the air. For the pianist, John Bickle, 57, a former Roman Catholic priest in New York and New Jersey, thoughts turned to when, at 24, he was asked about his own sexual orientation upon entering St. Anthony-on-Hudson Seminary in Rensselaer, N.Y. "They did ask and I didn't tell," the gay pianist recalled, with a laugh.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | By Nelson Schwartz, Inquirer Washington Bureau
About one in five veterans receiving disability payments from the federal government are getting money for medical diseases that were neither caused nor aggravated by military service, the General Accounting Office reported yesterday. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, estimated that $1.7 billion was paid in 1986 to veterans suffering from problems ranging from hemorrhoids to heart disease that were unrelated to their duty in the armed forces. Franklin Frazier of the GAO said current law makes veterans eligible for medical benefits for problems that arose or got worse during their time in the service - even if the problems were not caused by military duty.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
George W. Childs, 75, whose construction career spanned military service and civilian employment, died Friday at his Morrisville home. He retired as a manager in 1987 after a combined 35 years with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and the New Jersey Turnpike Commission. Mr. Childs was born in Doylestown Township and graduated from Doylestown High School. During World War II, he served in the Army and received his engineering degree through his work with an aviation engineers regiment in England.
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SPORTS
May 4, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
During last week's civil disturbances in Baltimore, when a baseball game had to be contested in a vacuum, America's fault lines were again exposed. Black and white. Left and right. Rich and poor. Choose your side and dig in your heels. As it turned out, Wednesday's eerie White Sox-Orioles game, a spectacle meant for fans being played in a ballpark where none were present, came a day before the 40th anniversary of the Vietnam War's end. That long and profoundly painful conflict felt like a decade of Baltimores.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
American kids often have a raised-eyebrow reaction when they find out Israel has conscription: All citizens over 18 must serve with the Israel Defense Forces. Men for three years, women for two. Although there are ways around it, military service is a fact of life there, so it's natural it would figure in dozens of home-brewed books, movies, and TV shows. The two men who return home after nearly two decades of imprisonment in Prisoners of War , the international hit that yielded Showtime's Homeland , were new, young conscripts when they were taken.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
WHEN YOU practice immigration law, your idea of what it means to be "American" is both fluid and sacred. The fluidity comes in seeing new applicants for that great gift of citizenship with their changing faces and histories. Color, creed and cadence are interesting variations on a theme of longing to belong, but they're ultimately inconsequential in the grand scheme of things. Multicultural isn't all that it's cracked up to be, if you listen to my clients. It's simply the politics of "feel good.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014
LAST week's column, "Until women can match men's prowess they should not be Marines," provoked some finger-wagging outrage at the gym, but the readers who wrote in mostly agreed with my sentiments. It's OK! Although equal, men and women are different. Honestly, can we at least get a consensus on that? In hopes of continuing the conversation, here's what some readers had to say:   I take great issue with your subheadline - "Until women can match men's prowess they should not be Marines.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
"WHY SO MANY bad cops?" I asked in October. That column brought a lot of reaction, from citizens and current and past officers, some with questions, some with suggestions. In the light of continuing personnel problems - it seems to fall short of a crisis (or does it?) - and in an effort to clear up misconceptions about the Philadelphia Police Department, I requested some time with Commissioner Charles Ramsey. I wanted to know about the quality and training of recruits, and more. I hate to explode widespread myths, but the Police Department does not hire high-school dropouts, nor does race play a role in hiring, Ramsey told me. Let's start with race, that evergreen and explosive topic.
SPORTS
November 13, 2013 | By Paul Tierney, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many, Veterans Day was merely a day off. For others, it allowed for reflection upon the generations of Americans who have gone overseas to protect our nation's freedom. But for Union midfielder Danny Cruz, military holidays are consumed by one unrelenting fact. His father, Army Sgt. First Class Alejo Cruz Jr., who goes by Al, is in harm's way in Afghanistan. "It's something you think about every single day," Danny Cruz said. "But as time goes on, I try to understand that this is what my father is passionate about.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Richard Lardner and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - With broad support from Republicans and Democrats, a House committee Wednesday approved legislation to tackle the growing problem of sexual assault in the armed forces by taking away the power of military commanders to overturn convictions in rape and assault cases. The bill passed by the House Armed Services Committee also requires that anyone found guilty of a sex-related crime receive a punishment that includes, at a minimum, a dismissal from military service or a dishonorable discharge.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Michael Hill and Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WEST POINT, N.Y. - Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told cadets at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point on Saturday they must stamp out the scourge of sexual assault in the military. His remarks, made a day after President Obama delivered a similar edict to U.S. Naval Academy graduates, follow a series of widespread incidents of sexual misconduct across the armed services in recent months and a new report showing the problem is growing. The challenge is particularly poignant for West Point, because an Army sergeant was charged earlier in the week with secretly photographing and videotaping at least a dozen women at the academy in New York state, including in a bathroom.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
MOORE, Okla. - Students from a suburban Oklahoma City elementary school destroyed by this week's tornado reunited with their teachers yesterday and collected whatever could be salvaged from the ruins. Meanwhile, family and friends attended the funeral of a 9-year-old girl who died at Plaza Towers Elementary School in Monday's storm, which killed 24 people. Back at the school, Cheryle Dixon, grandmother of first-grader Crisily Dixon, talked about how hard it was for the little girl.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank W. Wellons, 93, an engineering executive and former resident of the Philadelphia suburbs, died Friday, March 15, of pneumonia at Harborview Hospital in Seattle, Wash. Mr. Wellons lived in Devon and West Chester for 72 years before moving to Seattle in January to be near his daughter, Amy. He was recognized as an expert in roller bearings and was instrumental in developing a version of the buffering mechanisms that were used in aircraft turbine power plants. He also helped develop international engineering standards for roller bearings, his family said.
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