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Military Strategy

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July 10, 1988 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next month will mark 124 years since U.S. Naval Cmdr. David Glasgow Farragut, in the thick of the Battle of Mobile Bay during the Civil War, damned the torpedoes and proclaimed the now-famous order, "Full speed ahead!" Against great odds, Farragut's Union ships captured or destroyed the Confederate vessels in his path and then occupied their army's forts. Such brute defiance, once a mainstay of any nation's military seapower, would seem to have long since been replaced by the cool calculations racing through a modern warship's microcircuits.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
The recent hostilities between Israel and Hamas are a chance for the United States to think strategically. Or, better yet, rethink - specifically the Obama administration's "pivot to the Pacific. " The challenge was issued - "respectfully but forcefully" - by Paul McHale, who has been a Democratic congressman from Pennsylvania (1993-99) and an assistant secretary of defense for homeland defense (2003-09), and is a retired Marine colonel whose most recent deployment was to Afghanistan in 2007.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In support of the administration's $312 billion defense budget, Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger yesterday described U.S. military strategy as "prudent" and adequate to defend the nation - a contention immediately disputed by the new Democratic chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee. "Under President Reagan's leadership and with the bipartisan support of Congress, America has been following a coherent national security strategy that is prudent, affordable and of great benefit to our nation and our values," Weinberger told the Senate panel during his first appearance this year.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Pentagon should create a "military Oxford" that not only would help top officers brush up on military strategy but also would stress the economic, political and diplomatic aspects of national security, a House panel recommended yesterday. The recommendation was included in a study by a special panel of the House Armed Services Committee, which spent the last year reviewing the elite schools set up by the Pentagon and the four services for top career officers. Rep. Ike Skelton (D., Mo.)
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Automatic defense cuts looming in January would be more devastating than previously feared and make it impossible for President Obama to refocus his national security strategy, a bipartisan group of former lawmakers and retired military officers said Thursday. Members of the Bipartisan Policy Center painted a dire picture for the nation's economy, the military, and large and small defense contractors if the automatic reductions occur Jan. 2, 2013. Based on a special task force's calculations, the group said the cuts would mean an indiscriminate, across-the-board 15 percent reduction in programs and activities within the military, not the 10 percent that had been estimated.
NEWS
September 28, 2001 | By Trudy Rubin
President Bush says that America's war on terrorism is not aimed at the Afghan people. But our military preparations are stoking a massive humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, where a quarter of the population was already facing starvation before Sept. 11. The war scare has forced international aid agencies to withdraw their staffs, intensifying the food crisis. The United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR) fears that up to 1.5 million Afghans may soon flee to neighboring countries to find food or avoid bombs.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | BY LOWELL WEICKER JR., From the New York Times
Congress has pumped close to $2 trillion into the military budget in the last six years, yet military commanders in the field continue to complain that they do not have enough resources to carry out a wartime mission. What's going on? It's time that we stop focusing only on money and ask some questions about the way we shape our national security goals and military strategy. The problem begins at the Pentagon, where generals who plan military strategy aren't required to fit their goals into a realistic budget.
NEWS
July 2, 2001
The Department of Defense has just asked for an additional $18 billion for next year. But don't expect these billions - a 7 percent hike on top of an inflation bump - to make the nation much safer. Pentagon chief Donald Rumsfeld said Thursday that the extra money "only begins to make a dent" in the military's need to modernize. He wants another big increase for 2003, even though the United States is already spending as much on defense as the next eight nations together. It's hard to critique Mr. Rumsfeld's vision for a 21st-century military for the simple reason that he hasn't unveiled one yet. He says it's still not ready, after half a year's work.
NEWS
June 6, 2001
Help is on the way. That was George W. Bush's campaign cry to America's military. As president, he would transform its strategy, revolutionize its weaponry and beef up its budget. That got military leaders and contractors dreaming of a shopping spree that hasn't happened so far - fortunately. The latest welcome sign of prudence: Pentagon leaders were hoping for a midyear injection of up to $10 billion to spend through September, but the President disappointed them last week by asking Congress for about $6 billion.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush predicted yesterday that this week's NATO summit would result in changes but no "bombshell" overhauls for the western military alliance as it tries to define its role in Europe after the Cold War. Bush summoned his top national security advisers to his vacation home yesterday for talks aimed at refining proposals he will present to the Western European leaders at the two-day session in London on Thursday and Friday. Speaking to reporters, Bush refused to comment on reports that a letter he sent to the 15 other nations in the 41-year-old alliance proposed a basic shift in its military strategy - a redefining of NATO's nuclear arsenal as "weapons of last resort.
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NEWS
February 24, 2013
David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War By Fred Kaplan Simon & Schuster. 400 pp. $28 Reviewed by Tony Perry Everyone knows - or thinks they know - about the influence the military-industrial complex exerts on American foreign policy. But there is also a military-intellectual complex of think-tank researchers, policy theorists, academics, Pentagon bureaucrats, officers with Ph.D.s, and even a few columnists. It was this complex that greatly influenced America's military strategy in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
The recent hostilities between Israel and Hamas are a chance for the United States to think strategically. Or, better yet, rethink - specifically the Obama administration's "pivot to the Pacific. " The challenge was issued - "respectfully but forcefully" - by Paul McHale, who has been a Democratic congressman from Pennsylvania (1993-99) and an assistant secretary of defense for homeland defense (2003-09), and is a retired Marine colonel whose most recent deployment was to Afghanistan in 2007.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Automatic defense cuts looming in January would be more devastating than previously feared and make it impossible for President Obama to refocus his national security strategy, a bipartisan group of former lawmakers and retired military officers said Thursday. Members of the Bipartisan Policy Center painted a dire picture for the nation's economy, the military, and large and small defense contractors if the automatic reductions occur Jan. 2, 2013. Based on a special task force's calculations, the group said the cuts would mean an indiscriminate, across-the-board 15 percent reduction in programs and activities within the military, not the 10 percent that had been estimated.
NEWS
December 16, 2009 | By JOE SESTAK
I UNDERSTAND the concerns about sending more troops to Afghanistan. No one wants to put more of our servicemembers in harm's way, or tangled in a difficult and complex conflict. No one wants to be spending more abroad when there's so much to be done at home. I would not support President Obama's strategy if I didn't believe our mission in Afghanistan is indispensable to America's security and that the cost would be greater - to our security and our treasury - if we left now. After eight years and significant missteps, the people are justified in their concerns.
NEWS
September 27, 2009
Concern is growing that President Obama has become wobbly about the military strategy for Afghanistan that he endorsed in March. In fact, there's good reason to believe that a new report from his top military commander in that theater, Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, was leaked to gain public support before giving it to Obama. If that was the intent, it had some success. The president is being urged by some to meet McChrystal's request for additional troops lest the war be lost.
NEWS
March 6, 2008 | By JOHN BRUHNS
THE REAL truth about the war in Iraq is that it hasn't made us any safer at home and has only exacerbated the threat of terror attacks worldwide. The continued presence of the U.S. military in Iraq is fanning the flames of global anti-Americanism while stretching our military to a breaking point. To change course for the better, we have to truly understand the enemy we face and make the needed adjustments to our military strategy. The perpetrators of 9/11 died in the planes they hijacked while the masterminds, like Osama bin Laden, roam the mountains of Pakistan freely plotting more attacks on the United States.
NEWS
July 1, 2005 | By Kevin Ferris
Here's Osama bin Laden in 1998, in an interview with ABC: "We have seen . . . the decline of the American government and the weaknesses of the American soldier, who is ready to wage Cold Wars and unprepared to fight long wars. This was proven in Beirut when the Marines fled after two explosions . . . and this was also repeated in Somalia. . . . After a few blows, they ran in defeat. . . . [They] left, dragging their corpses and their shameful defeat. " Maybe bin Laden changed his mind about the American government and the American soldier after they ran him and the Taliban out of Kabul in 2001.
NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last week's events in Iraq have dealt a swift and stunning blow to the Bush administration's plans to withdraw U.S troops from the country's major cities, hand authority to local security forces, and orchestrate peaceful elections by January. But the street-by-street battles fought by Marines in the Sunni stronghold of Fallujah and the takeover of three southern cities by a Shiite militia do not necessarily mean that the coalition's efforts in Iraq are falling apart. For example, there is no evidence that insurgents have permanently disrupted the ongoing $20 billion reconstruction program.
NEWS
October 30, 2001 | Written by staff writer Dan D. Wiggs based on rumor, innuendo, colleagues' exaggerations and Daily News wire services
MILITARY STRATEGY: Talk is that the Pentagon big wigs are taking the same kind of foolish "Father Knows Best" approach to the Taliban that they did to the Viet Cong. Don't misunderstand. "War Stuff" doesn't know diddly about war strategy. No ROTC or anything. But critics who supposedly do know wonder whether the military establishment can even spell "Afghanistan. " They seem to have been listening to all the dim bulbs out there who shouted, "Let's bomb them back to the Stone Age!"
NEWS
September 28, 2001 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United States signaled this week that its military moves in Afghanistan may be more limited than the Bush administration initially led many Americans to believe. Administration officials who requested anonymity said that in planning the fight against the elusive Osama bin Laden and his followers in Afghanistan, the Pentagon was departing from the military doctrine of overwhelming force that has dominated U.S. strategy and tactics since the Civil War. The evolving military strategy includes elements of medieval siege warfare and frontier cavalry raids, directed by high-tech intelligence and communications gear and backed by American air power.
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