CollectionsMilitary Strike
IN THE NEWS

Military Strike

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | By JOHN W. DOUGLAS
Before Congress adjourned last month, it had dealt itself out of any American decision whether to start a war with Iraq. This is the unfortunate result of two congressional resolutions passed in early October by overwhelming margins - 380-29 in the House and 96-3 in the Senate. The separate resolutions properly commend President Bush for his speedy deployment of troops to the Persian Gulf and his leadership in marshaling international opposition to Iraq for its invasion of Kuwait and threat to Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Richard Parker and Raja Mishra of the Inquirer's Washington Bureau contributed to this article
U.S. warplanes were poised to fly toward Baghdad for the second time in two days when President Clinton called off the attack yesterday morning and declared that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had capitulated to American and U.N. demands. Clinton said the threat effectively forced Iraq to give in and allow U.N. weapons inspectors to search the country for nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. But, he added, the United States would remain poised to attack if Hussein again reneged on his promise, as he has in the past.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan said yesterday that he would take military action against Syria or Iran if there were "irrefutable evidence" that either country had committed an act of terrorism against the United States. Reagan's comments, made to a small group of editors and reporters during an interview at the White House, were the first by him to indicate that he would deal with other nations as he did with Libya last week, when he ordered a military strike. Asked specifically during a discussion of terrorism whether he would order attacks against Syria and Iran under similar circumstances, the President replied: "Yes, if we had that kind of evidence.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | By Mark Thompson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Owen Ullmann of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
The war of nerves between Iraq and the United States intensified yesterday as Pentagon officials said the aircraft carrier USS America had sailed into the Persian Gulf, within easy striking distance of Baghdad. It's "a signal to Iraq, but doesn't mean imminent military action," said a White House official of the threatening move against Iraq. The ship arrived in the narrow waterway on Thursday. U.S. carriers have been in the region since the Persian Gulf war ended last year, and regularly have sailed the confining waters of the gulf.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the United States edges toward military conflict with Iraq, Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny Primakov has emerged as the chief mediator in the dispute between Washington and Baghdad, a sign that his efforts to boost Moscow's diplomatic influence in world affairs are paying off. The dour, Arabic-speaking former KGB operative will meet today in Madrid with U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright to brief her on Russia's efforts to wring...
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau David Hess of The Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
President Bush and his top advisers have concluded that only a military strike will force Saddam Hussein to withdraw from Kuwait, senior administration officials said yesterday. The conclusion, which officials said they detected only within the last few days, surfaced as Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d prepared to meet Iraq's foreign minister in Geneva next week in an eleventh-hour bid to find a peaceful solution to the Persian Gulf crisis. In the past, administration officials have talked about the likelihood of war, in part, as a tactic to convince Hussein that Bush is not bluffing.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
President Bush said today "I have had it" with Iraq's Saddam Hussein's brutal treatment of U.S. hostages, but indicated he has no timetable for deciding on a possible military strike against Iraq. "The embassy is being starved," Bush said of the besieged U.S. mission in occupied Kuwait. "The people out there are not being resupplied. "The American flag is flying over the Kuwait Embassy and our people inside are being starved by a brutal dictator. " Speaking to reporters in Virginia, where he was campaigning for a congressional candidate, Bush said: "Do you think I'm concerned about it?
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. military strikes on Iran would shake the regime's political control and damage its ability to launch counterstrikes, but the Iranians probably would manage to retaliate - directly and through surrogates - in ways that risked igniting all-out war in the Middle East, according to an assessment of an attack's costs and benefits. The assessment said extended U.S. strikes could destroy Iran's most important nuclear facilities and damage its military forces but would only delay - not stop - the Islamic republic's pursuit of a nuclear bomb.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As Congress debates whether or not America should launch missile strikes on Syria, one question dwarfs all others: Would we be worse off by not acting than by acting? President Obama has boxed himself and the country into a situation where either choice is a bad one. His declared reason for a military strike - to deter and degrade Bashar al-Assad's ability to use chemical weapons - is insufficient. But his foreign policy credibility would be shattered if the international drama he's triggered with his red lines ends up with ... nothing.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Bush administration officials launched a new round of criticism of Iraq yesterday, saying that country's recent antiaircraft attacks on British and American pilots enforcing northern and southern no-fly zones illustrate Saddam Hussein's defiance of United Nations resolutions. The administration's comments, led by Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, apparently came in response to a Russian government statement earlier that enforcement of the no-fly zones is hampering negotiations for the return of weapons inspectors to Iraq, an assertion that Rumsfeld called "nonsensical.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As President Obama and lawmakers grapple with Syria's alleged chemical attacks, Bob Casey of Pennsylvania has a seat near the center of new maneuvering in the Senate. Casey, a Democrat, is part of a small bipartisan group of senators working on a plan to give Obama authorization to use military force in Syria if its leaders fail to turn over its chemical weapons to international monitors - an option that has gained momentum in recent days. That idea, first proposed by Russia, is now the subject of high-level diplomatic talks, taking the focus off Congress for now and placing it on the international stage.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As Congress debates whether or not America should launch missile strikes on Syria, one question dwarfs all others: Would we be worse off by not acting than by acting? President Obama has boxed himself and the country into a situation where either choice is a bad one. His declared reason for a military strike - to deter and degrade Bashar al-Assad's ability to use chemical weapons - is insufficient. But his foreign policy credibility would be shattered if the international drama he's triggered with his red lines ends up with ... nothing.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. military strikes on Iran would shake the regime's political control and damage its ability to launch counterstrikes, but the Iranians probably would manage to retaliate - directly and through surrogates - in ways that risked igniting all-out war in the Middle East, according to an assessment of an attack's costs and benefits. The assessment said extended U.S. strikes could destroy Iran's most important nuclear facilities and damage its military forces but would only delay - not stop - the Islamic republic's pursuit of a nuclear bomb.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Josef Federman, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israeli officials said Tuesday they are in close discussions with the United States over how to deal with the Iranian nuclear program, seeking to ease tensions that have emerged between the two allies over a possible Israeli military strike against Iran. The dialogue, in which Israel is looking for President Obama to take a tough public position against Iran, suggests the odds of an Israeli attack in the near term have been reduced. Israel, convinced that Iran isn't taking seriously U.S. vows to block it from acquiring nuclear weapons, believes that time to stop the Iranians is quickly running out. A series of warnings by Israeli officials in recent weeks has raised concerns that Israel could soon stage a unilateral military strike.
NEWS
October 5, 2006 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
War makes a soldier out of some. It made that and a political candidate out of Army Capt. Patrick Murphy. In the chaos of Baghdad, Murphy, an army lawyer training Iraqis in the civil defense corps, came to an unsettling conclusion. The president was wrong, the U.S. mission in Iraq had become "unclear," and it was time to pull out. "The political leaders of America have failed our troops," he decided. After being so disinterested in elective politics that he had rarely ever voted, Murphy in 2004 changed his registration from nonpartisan to Democrat, and in 2005 launched his bid for the U.S. House seat in Bucks County's Eighth District.
NEWS
April 16, 2006
Oh, God. It's all happening again. The scare-mongering, the dark talk of nuclear bombs handed off to terrorists. The rumblings about "regime change" and popular uprising. The up-tempo war planning done to a chorus of think-tank bravado. The smirky denials from the Pentagon. The acolytes chattering about the President's sense of history. Americans have seen this movie. It is called Operation Iraqi Freedom, and it grinds on bloodily to this day. Now, the camera shifts to Iran.
NEWS
April 20, 2003 | By Richard L. Zettler and Jeremy A. Sabloff
The land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers - whether we call it Mesopotamia as the Greeks did or use the Arabic geographical designation, Iraq - has been described as the "cradle of civilization," and for good reasons. Humankind's earliest cities were born on the floodplain, as were the first empires and centers of religion and learning. The early Mesopotamians (Sumerians) invented writing by about 3500 B.C., and produced the first records of our collective human history. For nearly a week now we have had to live with the saddening realization that Operation Iraqi Freedom and the civil disorder that followed military operations have robbed us of a key component of the world's cultural heritage.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Chris Mondics and Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Bustling through the Capitol yesterday on his way to a party conference on Iraq, Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) stopped just outside the Senate chamber and ruefully recalled the anger that surged through the nation during the Vietnam War. Lately, there have been plenty of reminders. Hundreds, actually. His office has been deluged with faxes and e-mail against American military action, with opponents outnumbering supporters by 200-1. Yet Lautenberg, who has been critical of President Bush for failing to convince allies of the need to confront Iraq, says he has thrown his support behind Bush.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Bush administration officials launched a new round of criticism of Iraq yesterday, saying that country's recent antiaircraft attacks on British and American pilots enforcing northern and southern no-fly zones illustrate Saddam Hussein's defiance of United Nations resolutions. The administration's comments, led by Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, apparently came in response to a Russian government statement earlier that enforcement of the no-fly zones is hampering negotiations for the return of weapons inspectors to Iraq, an assertion that Rumsfeld called "nonsensical.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | By Warren P. Strobel and John Walcott INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush has decided to oust Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein from power and ordered the CIA, the Pentagon and other agencies to devise a combination of military, diplomatic and covert steps to achieve that goal, senior U.S. officials said yesterday. No military strike is imminent, but Bush has concluded that Hussein and his nuclear, chemical and biological weapons programs are such a threat to U.S. security that the Iraqi dictator must be removed, even if U.S. allies do not help, said the officials, who all spoke on condition of anonymity.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|