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NEWS
May 26, 1999
The [People's Republic of China] seeks advanced U.S. military technology to achieve its long-term goals. To acquire U.S. technology, the PRC uses a variety of techniques, including espionage . . . and a network of individuals and organizations that engage in a vast array of contacts with scientists, businesspeople and academics. . . . The PRC's long-run geopolitical goals include incorporating Taiwan into the PRC and becoming the primary power in Asia. The PRC has not ruled out using force against Taiwan . . . The PRC has also asserted territorial claims against other Southeast Asian nations and Japan and has used its military forces as leverage in asserting these claims.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Idealism has nothing to do with the Soviet Union's diplomatic efforts to end the war in the Persian Gulf without destroying Iraq's military capability in the process. It's strictly bu$ine$$. The Soviets were reluctant signatories to all of the United Nations Security Council resolutions enacted against Iraq since its invasion of Kuwait, but they've never lost sight of the fact that the Iraqis have been their best arms customers. As such, a rout of Iraq's army by the U.S. and its allies would also represent a major setback for the market image of Soviet weaponry and military technology at a time when Moscow is already teetering on the very edge of economic collapse.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A small high-tech Horsham company affiliated with an Israeli corporation has agreed to pay a $600,000 criminal fine for admittedly selling guided-missile technology to China. At a press conference yesterday, Richard Smith, chief U.S. Customs Service investigator in Philadelphia, credited an unnamed "patriotic insider" for disclosing that Orbit/FR Inc. "was putting money in front of our country's national security interests. " Orbit/FR, an affiliate of an Israeli corporation, Orbit-Alchut Technologies Ltd., was charged yesterday and has agreed to plead guilty later to two violations of the Arms Export Control Act. The violations took place over a nine-month period, between September 1997 and May 1998, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Mary E. Crawley, the case prosecutor.
NEWS
March 22, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Stern, 85, of Merion, formerly of Melrose Park, a defense contractor and ardent supporter of Israel, died of a heart attack March 14 at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Stern designed and fabricated replacement parts for damaged warships while serving in the Navy in San Diego during World War II. After his discharge, he and some partners opened a machine shop in Bridesburg that became Action Manufacturing Co. He later bought out his partners and oversaw the expansion of the company to include six factories and 1,000 employees in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2012 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
PATUXENT RIVER NAVAL AIR STATION, Md. - The U.S. military is committed to developing the Marine Corps version of the next-generation strike fighter jet, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said Friday, but he warned that the program was "not out of the woods yet. " Standing in front of one of the fighter aircraft at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, where the jets are tested, Panetta said the Pentagon needed "to make sure we're on the cutting edge"...
BUSINESS
October 5, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Transportation Secretary Federico Pena, in Philadelphia to accept an award, said yesterday that the nation must "challenge the whole way that we have thought about transportation planning and investments" to compete in a tough global economy. "Too often, investment decisions have been shaped or misshapen by the availability of funds for specific modes," he said. "Too often, the first question asked was, 'How can we widen or extend a road?' or 'How can we add a new subway . . . or have a light rail system like other communities.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PYONGYANG, North Korea - North Korea's new leader addressed his nation and the world for the first time Sunday, vowing to place top priority on his impoverished country's military, which promptly unveiled a new long-range missile. The speech was the culmination of two weeks of celebrations marking the centenary of the birth of his grandfather, national founder Kim Il Sung - festivities that were marred by a failed launch Friday of a rocket that generated international condemnation and cost North Korea a food-aid-for-nuclear-freeze deal with Washington.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
From the Ruins of Empire The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia By Pankaj Mishra Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 368 pp. $27. Reviewed by Madhusree Mukerjee   'The minstrel, and the music, and the melody have all changed," lamented poet Akbar Illahabadi after the crushing of India's 1857 rebellion against the British East India Company. The last of the Mughal emperors was gone, his sons dead, their dazzling capital of Delhi razed. Nature herself had been transformed: "Another kind of rain falls from the sky; another kind of grain grows in the fields.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | By STANLEY A. WEISS
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney's base closing hit list brought home to many communities - including Philadelphia, where the Navy Yard has been targeted - the dark side of military reductions. And it's only the beginning. Over the next five years defense spending will decline by an additional 20 percent. Half a million military personnel will be forced into unexpected retirement and onto a precarious civilian economy, scores of defense plants will be idled and thousands of workers will be laid off. Dozens of additional military bases in the United States may be closed.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Relations between the United States and the Soviet Union have not been directly affected by the Iranian arms-sales controversy, but Soviet officials are quietly using the political scandal to try to score propaganda points with Western countries. During recent official visits here, representatives of several Western nations have found Soviet officials eager to discuss the arms deal and its negative impact on the effectiveness of the Reagan administration, a senior Western diplomat said Friday.
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NEWS
October 7, 2012
From the Ruins of Empire The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia By Pankaj Mishra Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 368 pp. $27. Reviewed by Madhusree Mukerjee   'The minstrel, and the music, and the melody have all changed," lamented poet Akbar Illahabadi after the crushing of India's 1857 rebellion against the British East India Company. The last of the Mughal emperors was gone, his sons dead, their dazzling capital of Delhi razed. Nature herself had been transformed: "Another kind of rain falls from the sky; another kind of grain grows in the fields.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PYONGYANG, North Korea - North Korea's new leader addressed his nation and the world for the first time Sunday, vowing to place top priority on his impoverished country's military, which promptly unveiled a new long-range missile. The speech was the culmination of two weeks of celebrations marking the centenary of the birth of his grandfather, national founder Kim Il Sung - festivities that were marred by a failed launch Friday of a rocket that generated international condemnation and cost North Korea a food-aid-for-nuclear-freeze deal with Washington.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Jean H. Lee, Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - North Korea's new leader addressed his nation and the world for the first time Sunday, vowing to place top priority on his impoverished country's military, which promptly unveiled a new long-range missile. The speech was the culmination of two weeks of celebrations marking the centenary of the birth of his grandfather, national founder Kim Il Sung - festivities that were marred by a failed launch Friday of a rocket that generated international condemnation and cost North Korea a food-aid-for-nuclear-freeze deal with Washington.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2012 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
PATUXENT RIVER NAVAL AIR STATION, Md. - The U.S. military is committed to developing the Marine Corps version of the next-generation strike fighter jet, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said Friday, but he warned that the program was "not out of the woods yet. " Standing in front of one of the fighter aircraft at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, where the jets are tested, Panetta said the Pentagon needed "to make sure we're on the cutting edge"...
NEWS
March 22, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Stern, 85, of Merion, formerly of Melrose Park, a defense contractor and ardent supporter of Israel, died of a heart attack March 14 at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Stern designed and fabricated replacement parts for damaged warships while serving in the Navy in San Diego during World War II. After his discharge, he and some partners opened a machine shop in Bridesburg that became Action Manufacturing Co. He later bought out his partners and oversaw the expansion of the company to include six factories and 1,000 employees in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A small high-tech Horsham company affiliated with an Israeli corporation has agreed to pay a $600,000 criminal fine for admittedly selling guided-missile technology to China. At a press conference yesterday, Richard Smith, chief U.S. Customs Service investigator in Philadelphia, credited an unnamed "patriotic insider" for disclosing that Orbit/FR Inc. "was putting money in front of our country's national security interests. " Orbit/FR, an affiliate of an Israeli corporation, Orbit-Alchut Technologies Ltd., was charged yesterday and has agreed to plead guilty later to two violations of the Arms Export Control Act. The violations took place over a nine-month period, between September 1997 and May 1998, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Mary E. Crawley, the case prosecutor.
NEWS
May 26, 1999
The [People's Republic of China] seeks advanced U.S. military technology to achieve its long-term goals. To acquire U.S. technology, the PRC uses a variety of techniques, including espionage . . . and a network of individuals and organizations that engage in a vast array of contacts with scientists, businesspeople and academics. . . . The PRC's long-run geopolitical goals include incorporating Taiwan into the PRC and becoming the primary power in Asia. The PRC has not ruled out using force against Taiwan . . . The PRC has also asserted territorial claims against other Southeast Asian nations and Japan and has used its military forces as leverage in asserting these claims.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As Republicans continued their attacks on the Clinton administration for approving a Chinese satellite launch and possibly endangering national security, the head of the U.S. satellite firm at the center of the allegations denied any wrongdoing yesterday. Bernard Schwartz, chief executive officer of the $15 billion Loral Space & Communications Co. and one of the largest donors to the Democratic Party, insisted he never sought any favors, broke any laws, or intentionally endangered U.S. national security.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The white Chevy van with dark-tinted windows and four silver antennas on top pulled around Philadelphia's City Hall. The van was rigged with $100,000 worth of electronic equipment designed to test a new mobile phone system. Inside, a crew from Geotek Communications Inc. connected a call to its transmission site on the 58th floor of One Liberty Place. "Hello? This is Jack," said the voice on the other end. What made the demonstration call notable was not what was said, but how - using a new technology that Geotek hopes will help it stake out a unique niche in the exploding world of wireless communications.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Transportation Secretary Federico Pena, in Philadelphia to accept an award, said yesterday that the nation must "challenge the whole way that we have thought about transportation planning and investments" to compete in a tough global economy. "Too often, investment decisions have been shaped or misshapen by the availability of funds for specific modes," he said. "Too often, the first question asked was, 'How can we widen or extend a road?' or 'How can we add a new subway . . . or have a light rail system like other communities.
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