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FOOD
June 13, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Could you tell me if milk and powdered eggs have any cholesterol? I have to watch my cholesterol intake. - Tana Dear Tana: If the powdered milk were whole milk, yes, it would contain cholesterol, as do powdered whole eggs. However, powdered non-fat milk, which is the kind normally found in the supermarket, does not contain cholesterol. Powdered egg whites (as opposed to powdered or dried whole eggs) also do not contain cholesterol. Dear Polly: Here's a quick dish: Heat a can of chicken-and-rice soup (don't dilute)
NEWS
December 23, 2007 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON BORO, Pa. - Twenty years ago, John Harnish was happy if his cows each yielded 17,000 pounds of milk a year. These days, his 145 black-and-white animals are veritable dairy queens - producing a hefty 27,000 pounds each. He credits most of the increase to breeding, more frequent milking, and better feed. Another factor comes straight from the biotech lab: biweekly injections of synthetic growth hormone. If you don't like that, you won't like this: As of Feb. 1 in Pennsylvania, consumers won't be able to tell the difference between milk from farms that inject their cows and milk from those that don't.
FOOD
December 10, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. A friend of mine buys two or three gallons of milk and puts them in the freezer. I heard that milk shouldn't be frozen because that's where the watery taste comes from. True or false? Mrs. Eddie Parsons Shreveport, La. A. When I was a child and we forgot to bring the delivered milk inside in the winter and it froze, we had to throw it out. Nobody would drink it. So recently when I read in the University of California's Wellness Letter that milk can be frozen and kept in the freezer for about a month, I assumed that since all milk is now homogenized, which it wasn't when I was a child, it could now be effectively frozen.
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer Daily news wire services contributed to this report
Milk is the perfect food. Not. That's the message from Dr. Benjamin Spock and several colleagues, whose concerns about cow's milk vary from a warning that it can be harmful to infants to a demand for a flat-out boycott of the white substance by people of all ages. Spock, 89, once a proponent of milk, now says that "breast feeding is the best milk feeding for babies. I want to urge parents, especially with subsequent babies, to use breast milk. " "This does not mean that every child that's been on cow's milk is doomed," Spock said yesterday.
NEWS
March 27, 2009
It seems schools are always under fire for the food they serve, but here's one of the many things the Philadelphia School District is doing right for our children - it serves milk free of rBGH, an artificial hormone that increases milk production but is also linked to colon, breast and prostate cancer in humans. Most of the industrialized world has banned rBGH. The U.S. not only allows it, but also serves it to our children. School boards from California to Wisconsin have passed resolutions making their districts officially rBGH-free.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By Don Cunningham, Special to The Inquirer
With an eye toward saving precious landfill space, two Montgomery County dairy farmers are selling some of their milk in bags and discouraging consumers from buying bulky plastic containers. The milk bag, once emptied of its contents, collapsed and disposed, requires much less landfill space than plastic or carton milk containers, the dairy farmers say. "We've been telling our customers for eight to 10 years, if you stack a truck full of those plastic jugs, it takes up a lot of room," Steve Quigley, a manager at Merrymead Farm in Lansdale, said, "but if you would stack the bags in the same truck it wouldn't take up a fraction of the space.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
NEXT MONTH, hundreds of thousands of pilgrims will flock like papal doves to Philly for the World Meeting of Families. Many will fly into and out of Philly International Airport. Some will have babies in tow, and those babies will get hungry on their flights back home. And they will want milk. Because they're, y'know, babies. My prayerful entreaty is that the Transportation Security Administration is more accommodating with them than it was with the Bunn's baby. Last Monday morning, Steve and Susana Bunn were headed home to Santa Ana, Calif., after a long visit here with friends and family (Steve is a Philly native)
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A small milk-distribution center in the Matlack Industrial Park was approved unanimously this week by the West Goshen Board of Supervisors. Rosenberger's Dairies Inc. plans to move into the 4,700-square-foot office and warehouse from its plant at 700 S. Bradford Ave. in East Bradford Township. Each night, one tractor-trailer will drop off the milk from the company's Hatfield plant; route drivers will pick up the milk early in the morning. The new office will be built on a 2-acre lot at 209 Carter Drive, the last lot to be developed in the industrial park.
FOOD
August 29, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I make ice cubes out of milk and add them to my child's milk thermos in his lunch box. This keeps the milk really cold and fresh without watering it down. - Mom Dear Polly: An electric blanket makes a wonderful heating pad if you have a sore back. Just spread the blanket on a bed or the floor, plug it in and lie down on it. Very soothing. - Marian Dear Polly: To keep natural peanut butter from separating after stirring it up the first time, just put it in the refrigerator.
FOOD
May 22, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I read many food magazines containing recipes for custards or puddings that specify "do not use low-fat or skim milk. " Why is this? I cannot make these recipes since I can only drink skim milk. - Mrs. V.S. Skim or low-fat milk can tend to make custards a bit watery, but I have made all manner of puddings and custards using skim milk and 1 percent milk, and they turn out fine most of the time. I'd say go ahead and make the recipe using your low-fat or skim milk so you can judge the results for yourself.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
New parents: Did the hospital temporarily label your newborn with the first name of "Babyboy" or "Babygirl"? If so, double-check the label when nurses give you a bottle of breast milk. There is a small chance that the milk came from another mother. A new study by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority found 1,234 misidentification "events" involving babies born at hospitals and birthing centers in the state in 2014 and 2015, averaging about two a day. In almost all cases, there was no harm to the baby, generally because providers caught the mistake before it led to any incorrect treatment.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: During a recent family dinner, my uncle presented an odd gift to everyone there. He's in his mid-50s and involved in the community and government of a small town. He and other "public figures" - most of them older - decided to publish a calendar. On each page, there is a nude photo of an aging community luminary posing with strategically placed objects covering his/her "goods. " To say the least, the photos are not flattering, funny, or particularly modest. Not only did my uncle give one to every family member - including my 80-year-old grandparents - but he also took pains to point out his photo.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
NEXT MONTH, hundreds of thousands of pilgrims will flock like papal doves to Philly for the World Meeting of Families. Many will fly into and out of Philly International Airport. Some will have babies in tow, and those babies will get hungry on their flights back home. And they will want milk. Because they're, y'know, babies. My prayerful entreaty is that the Transportation Security Administration is more accommodating with them than it was with the Bunn's baby. Last Monday morning, Steve and Susana Bunn were headed home to Santa Ana, Calif., after a long visit here with friends and family (Steve is a Philly native)
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | Vance Lehmkuhl
THANKS to hipster vegans, almond milk is suddenly a thing: Almonds, a "thirsty crop," are draining California's water and increasing the drought, all for a product that's only 2 percent nuts. Right? Hang on: Actually, almond milk was a thing back in the middle ages, used widely because it didn't spoil as quickly as cow's milk, and because for many, almonds were easier to get than cows. And the $900 million spent on almond milk last year, making it the declining dairy industry's top competitor, came from a much larger crowd than vegans and/or hipsters.
FOOD
July 10, 2015 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
NEW YORK - If there were a Food Olympics, beets would be overtaking kale in the produce competition. In the flavor event, two unlikely competitors, lavender and sriracha, would be out front, with their counterparts, elderflower and habañero, close behind. Matcha, the trendy powdered green-tea drink, would dominate the beverage field, while waffles would be leaving cupcakes in the dust (or perhaps crumbs). And, in a stunning upset, a Vermont goatherd would take the gold in the confection class, beating out powerhouse European chocolatiers with his goat's-milk caramels.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In those cash-strapped days when you first moved into your own place and used plastic milk crates as furniture, you might not have considered yourself part of the sustainability movement. But you were, by repurposing that crate. A few years ago, Morgan Berman decided she, too, wanted to live a greener existence. "I kept thinking, 'I want to make these life choices,' but I didn't know how," the 29-year-old Philadelphia resident recalled. So she developed an app, MilkCrate, to help her and other like-minded consumers connect with local sustainable businesses and other resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Simpatico Theatre Project presents Obie Award-winning Milk Like Sugar by Kirsten Greenidge, an engrossing drama that is both a cautionary tale and a societal indictment, with a superb cast. Greenidge can write what sounded to me to be pitch-perfect dialogue, and Alan Radway directs the ensemble with respect and a clever use of the Adrienne Theatre's Skybox space. Three teenage African American girls, living in a ghettoized community in any American city, are sworn friends: Annie (Nastassja Baset)
NEWS
January 9, 2015
SLOW-COOKER COCOA Mars' upscale, old-fashioned American Heritage brand offers this extra-rich recipe that calls for three kinds of dairy and grated chocolate with origins in 1750. 14 ounces sweetened condensed milk 1 pint heavy cream 6 cups whole milk 12.72-ounce package American Heritage Chocolate Finely Grated Chocolate Drink Put all ingredients in a slow cooker. Set on low and stir frequently. You do not want the milk to scald. Cook for approximately 2 hours or until the chocolate is melted.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Stephen Lorek, lead singer of Philadelphia rock trio Shark Tape, is holding the band's debut album, Marathon , in his hands. Finally. "From this point on, I'm making a record every year," says the songwriter, bassist, and Fishtown resident. "No more lulls. " As Lorek sings on the fourth song of the propulsive, eminently catchy Marathon , it's been a "Long Time Coming. " The band, which also includes guitarist Niles Weiss and drummer Dylan Mulcahy, celebrates the release of Marathon at MilkBoy Philly on Saturday.
FOOD
October 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
There are more than 100 cheese-makers in the province of Québec, the most of any in Canada, and they are producing some of the most exciting artisan cheeses in the New World, from washed-rind stinkers to creamy blues. That comes as no surprise, given the province's cheese-loving French DNA. Unfortunately, few of the best - especially those made from raw milk - are widely available in the States. That just means you'll have to visit some of the fine cheesemongers of Québec City.
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