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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
After 17 years in the music business, Craig Finn thought he'd try doing things like a pro. That's not to say the Hold Steady front man is some kind of amateur. Over the course of five albums, leading up to 2010's Heaven Is Whenever, the Hold Steady have wooed both critics and audiences with Finn's Beat-poet lyrics and the band's fist-pumping anthems. But after the lackluster response to Heaven 's glossier sheen, Finn felt it was time to step away from his familiar Hold Steady collaborators and try his hand at the industrial grind of the songwriter-for-hire.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | by Frank Kummer, Staff Writer
A 3-year-old boy and a 27-year-old man from South Jersey became ill recently from drinking raw milk from a Pennsylvania farm. New Jersey health officials are warning residents about the risks of drinking unpasteurized milk in wake of the illnesses. The state Department of Health and Senior Services says the two became sick after consuming the milk from Family Cow Dairy in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. The department does not specify when the two became sick. Currently 78 people from several states have fallen ill with Campylobacteriosis, a gastrointestinal illness, from the consumption of raw milk contaminated with bacteria traced to the farm.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An outbreak of bacterial infections on the East Coast illustrates the popularity of raw, unpasteurized milk despite strong warnings from public health officials about the potential danger. Even presidential candidate Ron Paul has joined the cause of consumers looking to buy unprocessed "real foods" straight from the farm, saying government shouldn't deny them that choice. An outbreak of campylobacter illness is a reminder of the potential hazards, however. Raw milk from a dairy in Chambersburg, Pa., is now linked to 38 cases in four states, and the farm has temporarily suspended sales.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - Picture a boxy old delivery truck with a huge pink breast on top. The nipple is a flashing red light. It's the Milk Truck, spreading the message that nursing mothers have the need and right to feed their infants in public. Jill Miller, an artist and mother, said she got the idea after the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh asked her to do a project of her choice last year. "I really wanted to make a piece that appealed to the wider community here, not just to the art audience," she said.
NEWS
January 2, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a tumultuous 2011 in which they opened a new Center City coffee-and-music venue amid a nasty labor dispute, no one would have faulted rising entertainment entrepreneurs Jamie Lokoff and Tommy Joyner for taking it easy in the new year. But that's not how they roll at MilkBoy, a blend of java- and music-brewed business ventures that seeks to reinvent itself in 2012. Joyner and Lokoff are focusing on Center City after a decade running a recording studio and their now well-known coffee house in Ardmore (and a smaller one in Bryn Mawr)
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: For years, I've had a glass of warm milk to help me fall asleep. I think it works as well as a sleeping pill, but it's a lot safer and is natural - which I like. Is it the tryptophan in the milk that causes me to feel sleepy? Answer: Warm milk at bedtime definitely can have a calming effect, but despite popular belief, it's probably not caused by the effect of the amino acid tryptophan on the brain. In order for tryptophan or any sleep-promoting drug to work, it must cross the "blood-brain barrier" and get from the bloodstream into the brain tissue.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 6 a.m. Monday, Tommy Joyner and Jamie Lokoff finally swung open the doors to their long-awaited, one-of-a-kind, java-and-booze-with-music MilkBoy Coffee emporium in Center City and encountered something that has largely eluded them for much of the last 10 months: labor peace. It lasted roughly one hour. By 7 a.m., carpenters' union members, furious that the new MilkBoy outlet at 11th and Chestnut Streets had been rehabbed by nonunion workers, were picketing outside the main doors - just as they had done at the original MilkBoy in Ardmore.
NEWS
May 28, 2011
About a year ago, after months of investigation complete with undercover purchases, a posse of federal agents made a predawn move on a Pennsylvania farm and discovered a sizable stash of pure, unadulterated . . . milk. The government's pursuit of Daniel Allgyer, an Amish dairy farmer in Lancaster County, continued last month with a federal complaint seeking to stop his hustling of unpasteurized milk, which has long been popular among the crunchy set but illegal to sell across state lines.
FOOD
May 26, 2011 | By Wendy Donahue, Chicago Tribune
Milk does a child's body good, but choosing the right type can make a parent's head ache. As reports of childhood obesity rise, we asked registered dietitian Sarah Krieger, a children's hospital consultant in St. Petersburg, Fla., and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, to share guidelines she is giving families. Question: Why is milk important for children? Answer: It contains so many nutrients that children need to grow. Calcium is obvious, but milk is also high in potassium - it has more than bananas - phosphorus, protein, vitamins like B12 and D and magnesium.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By CATHERINE LUCEY & JAN RANSOM, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
THE MESSAGE from the parents and students who poured into City Council chambers yesterday was clear: Save our schools. Facing a $629 million deficit for the fiscal year that starts July 1, the Philadelphia School District plans drastic cuts to teachers and programs, if it doesn't get some 11th-hour help. Superintendent Arlene Ackerman this week asked Council and the mayor to provide an additional $75 million to $110 million to help stave off some painful cuts, like slashing full-day kindergarten.
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