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NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Shino Yuasa and Eric Talmadge, Associated Press
FUKUSHIMA, Japan - In the first sign that contamination from Japan's stricken nuclear complex had seeped into the food chain, officials said Saturday that radiation levels in spinach and milk from farms near the tsunami-crippled facility exceeded government safety limits. Minuscule amounts of radioactive iodine also were found in tap water Friday in Tokyo and elsewhere in Japan - although experts said none of those tests showed any health risks. The Health Ministry also said that radioactive iodine slightly above government safety limits was found in drinking water at one point Thursday in a sampling from Fukushima prefecture, the site of the nuclear plant, but later tests showed the level had fallen again.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynn Heinisch says her infant son's life was saved by mothers' milk - other mothers' milk. Heinisch wasn't producing enough breast milk for Liam, and formula made him horribly sick. At 4 months, he weighed a skeletal eight pounds. So Heinisch, who lives in Croydon, turned to friends and the Internet, tapping a trend that proponents see as well-informed wet-nursing in a wired world - and public health officials call risky. "At first, my pediatrician was concerned.
NEWS
October 19, 2010 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
A popular, newly elected Chester County sheriff had held the office just one day when he was fatally struck by a milk-delivery train on his way to Phoenixville to serve court orders. The county's law enforcement community wants to honor Benjamin F. Irey as one of nine officers killed in the line of duty, but has hit a snag. Finding his next of kin has proved challenging - because he was killed on Jan. 3, 1887. Irey is to be memorialized through the county's Hero Plaque program.
NEWS
September 10, 2010
ALBANY, N.Y. - Milk sold in New Jersey and four other Northeastern states has been recalled because it might not have been properly pasteurized. The milk was marketed under the brand names Midland Farms, Corrado's Market, Jersey Dairy Farms, and Trade Fair Premium, according to New York regulators. The milk - from pints to gallons - also went to stores in New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. Inspectors found failed pasteurization equipment at the Midland Farm plant near Albany on Tuesday.
NEWS
September 9, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALBANY, N.Y. - Some milk sold in New Jersey and four other Northeastern states has been recalled because it might not have been properly pasteurized. New York regulators say the milk was marketed under the brand names Midland Farms, Corrado's Market, Jersey Dairy Farms and Trade Fair Premium. It went in sizes from pints to gallons to stores in New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Rhode Island. Inspectors found failed pasteurization equipment at the Midlands Farm plant near Albany on Sept.
NEWS
July 7, 2010
YORK, Pa. - Pennsylvania environmental officials say about 1,400 gallons of milk from a storage tank leaked into a central Pennsylvania creek. Department of Environmental Protection officials say the milk leaked from a storage tank at Rutter's Dairy in Manchester Township, York County, into a nearby stream on Monday. Department spokesman John Repetz said that no aquatic organisms were found dead in the waterway and that the milk dispersed by natural means. Repetz said a weld split open on a 30,000-gallon storage tank, and about 14,000 gallons got through foam insulation around the tank.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Columnist
Five years ago, sales of organic milk were booming, but the industry was embroiled in controversy over big dairy operations in Western states that were flouting the spirit of federal organic rules by giving cows only limited access to pasture. Now, with growth in sales of organic dairy products soft for the first time since the U.S. Department of Agriculture's organic-food rules took effect in 2000, a new rule effective Thursday sets tough standards for how much of its food a dairy cow should get from grass during grazing season.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2010
Want to make your own Greek yogurt? Tom Vasiliades, owner of South Street Souvlaki, describes the process. Boil whole milk. Vasiliades prepares a gallon at a time for himself and eight gallons a night for the restaurant. When milk rises, remove from heat. Let it cool to lukewarm. Vasiliades said you should be able to hold your pinkie finger in the milk for 10 seconds - that means it's lukewarm. Remove a cup of the cooled milk. Mix this with yogurt culture or yesterday's yogurt (2-3 commercial spoonfuls per 2 gallons of milk)
NEWS
March 27, 2010
It's not really so odd that Pennsylvania's city-bred governor has been waging a three-year battle to aid the state's more than 7,400 dairy farms - or that consumers on Rendell's home turf of Philadelphia should be rooting for him to finally win a round. While he's rarely seen on a tractor outside the Pennsylvania Farm Show, Gov. Rendell knows that dairy farming represents 50,000 to 60,000 jobs in the state. For consumers, the price of milk is a week-in, week-out expense on almost everyone's grocery list.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
For those who desire to vote with their food dollars in support of a different food system, Milk & Honey Market at 45th Street and Baltimore Avenue is a good option. The market focuses on locavore, whose definition depends on whom you ask. For some, it means adding as much fresh and local foods to the shopping cart as possible. Others have geographic boundaries - eating or drinking nothing that comes from beyond a 150-mile radius or, in the extreme, 50 miles. I'll admit my bias here.
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