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Mill Grove

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NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Michael L. Rozansky, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one could know when he arrived at Mill Grove that he would turn out to be an acclaimed artist and naturalist. The signs were not particularly promising. He was a dandy, the illegitimate son of a French sea captain, an indifferent naval student sent by his father to America in 1803 to help run a lead mine on his Pennsylvania estate and to avoid conscription into Napoleon's army. The young man with flowing hair and deep-set eyes did not take to mining. He spent his days fishing, hunting in satin breeches and a ruffled shirt, going to parties, and drawing birds.
NEWS
November 20, 2005 | Inquirer suburban staff
What there is to see: The property contains a 1762 stone house, a bank barn, and 67 acres of open space. Visitors will learn about the life of celebrated bird expert John James Audubon as they stroll through the house and grounds. Interpretive vignettes depict his work studios. Mounted birds and mammals offer visitors a glimpse of the creatures Audubon studied and painted. Standout pieces include The Eagle and the Lamb, a painting Audubon did to pay for the production of his famous book, Birds of America.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For a little less than three years, John James Audubon was a resident of Mill Grove in Montgomery County. There he developed the skills that made him a master painter of birds. He also found the love of his life, and began the journey that transformed him from a man without a country to an American. These are some of the major themes Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Richard Rhodes developed in his new biography, John James Audubon: The Making of an American. Audubon was born in 1785 on the island of Saint-Domingue, the present-day Haiti.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | By Stephanie Banchero, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mill Grove, the 175-acre sylvan retreat in Lower Providence Township, is now officially a National Historic Landmark. The honor was bestowed on the site by the U.S. Department of Interior during a brief ceremony on July 28. Mill Grove is owned and maintained by Montgomery County. The ceremony also served to kick off a fund-raising effort to construct an Audubon-related museum at the Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary on the site. Friends of Audubon, a civic group, initiated the fund-raising effort.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John James Audubon is arguably the world's greatest painter of birds. By depicting the natural poses and habitats of his subjects, he gave his art a realistic, lifelike quality that has made it a treasured possession of museums and private collectors alike. Audubon mastered his technique during a stay of a little more than two years at Mill Grove in Lower Providence - his first home in the United States. "In Pennsylvania, a beautiful state . . . my father . . . gave me what America called a beautiful plantation . . . by the waters of the Schuylkill River and transversed by a creek called Perkioming.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While John James Audubon's conservation legacy has led to the protection of species worldwide, it has not really borne fruit at the one place he called home: the Montgomery County farmhouse known as Mill Grove. But on Wednesday, the Montgomery County commissioners are to announce a $3 million grant, part of a $10 million effort to restore the rundown house, build a conservation center, and display more of its namesake's valuable art. Commissioners Chairman James R. Matthews said the grant would create a national tourist attraction that could bolster the local economy.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Supporters of Mill Grove hope to raise more than $10 million to build a visitor center and exhibition gallery at the first American home of John James Audubon, the renowned 19th-century artist, author and ornithologist. Mill Grove, a 175-acre free museum and wildlife sanctuary along Perkiomen Creek in Lower Providence, is a National Historic Landmark and one of five historic sites operated by the county. Leigh Altadonna, chairman of the Audubon Center at Mill Grove Inc., the five-member interim committee overseeing the project, said that the Montgomery County commissioners had lent the committee $50,000 to hire a consultant to study the feasibility of a capital campaign and to devise a fund-raising plan.
REAL_ESTATE
July 16, 1999 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
"I can't say enough good things about all of them," Millie Newman said of the maintenance and office staff at Mill Grove apartments and townhouses in Lower Providence Township. But she gave it her best try. "Maintenance keeps it so clean. . . they're mowing the lawn and doing landscaping almost every day," Newman said. "And if there's any problem with the apartment, they're right on top of it. " Through the years, Mill Grove has garnered many Best in Apartment Living awards from the Apartment Association of Philadelphia, some for overall excellence, and others for maintenance, including a couple of "Top Score" awards.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
John James Audubon came to the United States to dodge the draft. And in the three years he lived at Mill Grove in Montgomery County, he found his lifelong love and perfected a hobby that years later would make him America's most famous avian artist and first birder. Mill Grove and Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary, now owned by the county, will hold a free celebration of its most famous resident's 214th birthday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow. The party will include a cake, a native plant and bake sale, guided walks, and storytelling.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the middle of the 19th century, copper mining near what was then the village of Shannonville promised to become a leading local industry, on a par with the anthracite coal mines upstate. After a decade, however, the copper mines no longer produced a profit, and they were abandoned. Nature moved in, and over the intervening 130 years covered the scars of the mining enterprise. Today they are all but hidden, and mostly forgotten. Yet on the grounds of Mill Grove, site of the Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary, one can still find the unmarked graves of the miners who toiled there in the days before the Civil War. A 40-foot-high brick chimney and several small openings in the earth offer further evidence.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One hundred years ago, a bird named Martha made history with one simple, inevitable act: She died. She was the planet's lone remaining passenger pigeon. Her death on Sept. 1, 1914, marked a rare instance when the exact date of an extinction is known. (Although, in truth, some accounts put her demise a day or two earlier.) How a species that numbered in the billions - once North America's most abundant bird - can disappear in a matter of decades is a sad story of "deliberate, wanton, and direct human actions," said Joel Greenberg, a Chicago author and natural history researcher.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than half a century, scholars and biographers of famed bird artist and ornithologist John James Audubon had been stumped. In an 1824 diary entry, the young French immigrant, who lived for several years at Mill Grove in Montgomery County, mentioned that he had given a drawing of a running grouse to a Philadelphia engraver for use on a New Jersey banknote. It would have been a key moment - the first published illustration for the struggling artist, then 29 years old. But if so, where was it?
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While John James Audubon's conservation legacy has led to the protection of species worldwide, it has not really borne fruit at the one place he called home: the Montgomery County farmhouse known as Mill Grove. But on Wednesday, the Montgomery County commissioners are to announce a $3 million grant, part of a $10 million effort to restore the rundown house, build a conservation center, and display more of its namesake's valuable art. Commissioners Chairman James R. Matthews said the grant would create a national tourist attraction that could bolster the local economy.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
While John James Audubon's conservation legacy has led to the protection of species worldwide, it has not really borne fruit at the one place he called home: the Montgomery County farmhouse known as Mill Grove. But on Wednesday, the Montgomery County commissioners are to announce a $3 million grant, part of a $10 million effort to restore the rundown house, build a conservation center, and display more of its namesake's valuable art. Commissioners Chairman James R. Matthews said the grant would create a national tourist attraction that could bolster the local economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
At 47, Barbie still looks good - and retains her impeccable fashion taste. She will make an appearance at an advance screening of her latest feature film at Grant Plaza on Saturday. Barbie in the 12 Dancing Princesses is a musical adventure starring Barbie as Princess Genevieve. After their father's evil cousin Rowena forbids them to sing and dance in the kingdom, Genevieve and her sisters run away to a secret palace. But they must soon return to save their father, the king, from Rowena's plot to take over the throne.
NEWS
February 26, 2006 | Inquirer staff
What it is: A free event Saturday at the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove. What we like: Have you ever wondered, while drenching your pancakes, how maple syrup is produced? You can get the answers - not to mention some syrup - at the festival, which celebrates the custom of gathering sap from maple trees. Guests will walk to various stations, where they also will learn the history of maple sugaring. At the Sugarbush station, you'll learn about the science of the sap run and methods for tapping trees.
NEWS
November 20, 2005 | Inquirer suburban staff
What there is to see: The property contains a 1762 stone house, a bank barn, and 67 acres of open space. Visitors will learn about the life of celebrated bird expert John James Audubon as they stroll through the house and grounds. Interpretive vignettes depict his work studios. Mounted birds and mammals offer visitors a glimpse of the creatures Audubon studied and painted. Standout pieces include The Eagle and the Lamb, a painting Audubon did to pay for the production of his famous book, Birds of America.
NEWS
July 21, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Silas Maddox, a 5-year-old from Westtown, has muscle weakness. He also has trouble expressing himself. But yesterday, the little boy responded to directions as he confidently rode a pony named Toby at an equestrian therapy center in Chester County. Malick Elarbi, 12, an Upper Merion day camper there to volunteer, offered a steady hand and encouragement. "Wow, he's amazing. Good job, Silas," Elarbi said. Elarbi is among 25 to 30 children ages 11 to 13 who have parlayed their time at Upper Merion Adventure Day Camp into community service this summer.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For a little less than three years, John James Audubon was a resident of Mill Grove in Montgomery County. There he developed the skills that made him a master painter of birds. He also found the love of his life, and began the journey that transformed him from a man without a country to an American. These are some of the major themes Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Richard Rhodes developed in his new biography, John James Audubon: The Making of an American. Audubon was born in 1785 on the island of Saint-Domingue, the present-day Haiti.
NEWS
November 28, 2003 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
A single street ending in a cul-de-sac runs through a wooded area abutting the Audubon historic site and wildlife sanctuary at Mill Grove, providing access to the shaded courtyards and walking paths of the rental community that shares its name. "It's a very beautiful area, and that appealed to me," said James Hatfield, 37, a Web site designer for Merck Pharmaceuticals who moved to the complex six months ago. Each of the nine courtyards off the main road are enclosed by three two-story brick and stone buildings with apartments and townhouses.
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