CollectionsMillage Rate
IN THE NEWS

Millage Rate

FIND MORE STORIES »
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Hard hit by property assessment appeals by businesses and a decline in budgeted reserves, the Ridley school board has adopted a preliminary budget calling for a 22 percent increase in annual real estate taxes. About 75 residents witnessed the adoption of the $27,205,548 preliminary budget during Monday's board meeting. The budget includes a 62-mill tax increase. Nicholas Ignatuk, director of administrative service and business for the district, said that in the 1988-89 fiscal year, the district would have to refund $1,808,962 because of assessment appeals.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
First, a word of caution. None of this will affect your property-tax bill. Still reading? It may drive your millage rate down by 90 percent. But it will not mean any relief for your pocketbook. As the countywide reassessment draws to a close, the Montgomery County commissioners must decide what complex mathematical formula they will use to figure out each resident's bill. Will the assessed value be equal to what you can really sell your home for? Or will the assessed value be a random portion of the home's market value?
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
With no primary races to worry about, candidates for Plymouth Township Council are scrimmaging for the November election, arguing about fiscal responsibility and a campaign to prevent a trash-to-steam plant from being built in the township. William I. English Jr., a 41-year-old Republican lawyer from Norristown, has attacked District 2 incumbent Democrat John J. Washeleski for allegedly showing a lack of leadership in the township's fight against a Montgomery County trash-to-steam plant.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The township's successful challenge to Peco Energy Co.'s rates for streetlights will mean a small savings for residents next year. Under the proposed budget for fiscal 2000, which will become effective Jan. 1, residents will not have to pay the direct costs of streetlighting. And that change will save them an average of $36 in taxes next year, said Elaine Gibbs, finance director for Newtown Township. The $11 million budget, expected to be approved tomorrow night, calls for shifting the cost of streetlighting from a special fund to the town's general fund.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here it is, the number you've all been waiting for: 3.7 mills. That is Delaware County officials' first estimate of the county tax rate under the new market-value property assessments that take effect in 2000. The number may sound low to taxpayers who are used to a millage rate of 123.34, meaning they paid $123.34 for every $1,000 of assessed value. But the tax rate has not changed much, say county officials. Under the old assessment, the average property assessment was $3,930, just 3.3 percent of estimated market value.
NEWS
June 12, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As enrollment here continues to grow like weeds in a hothouse, school board officials responded Tuesday by unanimously approving a 1997-98 budget that will raise taxes 4.8 percent. The increase - the second in as many years - will add $75 to the annual tax bill of homes assessed at the district average of $3,000, bringing the individual burden to $1,635 from $1,560. In terms of the tax rate, the $80.9 million budget will require a 25-mill increase, raising the total millage rate to 545 from the 1996-97 figure of 520. District officials, wary in the face of sporadic taxpayer resistance at recent meetings, justify the tax increase with numbers: Officials expect 600 more students in 1997-98 than were present this year, for an increase of 5.4 percent over the current enrollment of 11,063.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Homeowners who resolved to save more money this year have already done so. Thanks to a reduction in the millage rate, the owner of a home at the average assessment is more than 5 cents richer today. The Board of Commissioners last month approved a 1.25-mill reduction in the property tax rate, which, said Assistant Township Manager David Dodies, translates to an annual savings of $10 for the owner of a home assessed at $8,000, the township average. That works out to 2.73 cents a day. With a millage rate of 39.29, the township is now levying $314 in property taxes on a home at the average assessment.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township supervisors are expected to adopt a budget for 1996 that would reduce the property tax rate by nearly 23 percent. A homeowner with property assessed at the township average of $6,000 would pay $81, $24 less than this year. The total millage would be reduced from 17.5 mills to 13.5 mills. Final adoption is scheduled for 9 a.m. Dec. 28. In an interview yesterday, Supervisors Chairman Rocco Imperatrice said, "We (will have) succeeded in getting the taxes cut in half" in the last two years.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Centennial School District is getting ready to join hundreds of other school districts in Pennsylvania that collect earned income taxes from residents. At Tuesday's school board meeting, the board voted, 7-1, to authorize advertisement of a resolution that would allow the district to collect a wage tax. The tax, which would go into effect July 1, would be one half of 1 percent of a resident's salary. Board member William Alford voted against the motion without comment. Board member Barbara Rabinowitz of the finance committee estimated that the tax would bring in $1.7 million to the school district.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
The Downingtown area school board has given tentative approval to a budget of $53.7 million for next year - and a 13 percent tax hike to pay for it. At its meeting Wednesday, the board voted, 6-3, to pass the budget and to set the millage rate at 169, an increase of almost 19 1/2 mills. The new millage rate means the owner of a property with an assessment of $11,000 would pay about $214 more, for a total of $1,859.00 in property taxes. A mill equals a tax bill of $1 for each $1,000 assessed valuation.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|