CollectionsMillage Rate
IN THE NEWS

Millage Rate

FIND MORE STORIES »
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council on Thursday showed the first signs of rebellion against Mayor Nutter's plan to reform the city's property-tax system while picking up an extra $90 million in the process. Councilman Mark Squilla, whose First District in South Philadelphia could face some of the steepest tax increases from the switch, introduced a bill to keep the current system and tax rates for one more year. Squilla's bill and other grumblings from Council members emerged just days before Nutter administration officials are scheduled to testify before Council on their proposed budget.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Troy Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council on Thursday showed the first signs of rebellion against Mayor Nutter's plan to reform the city's property tax system while picking up an extra $90 million in the process. Councilman Mark Squilla, whose First District in South Philadelphia could face some of the steepest tax increases from the switch, introduced a bill to keep the current system and tax rates for one more year. Squilla's bill and other grumblings from Council members emerged just days before Nutter administration officials are scheduled to testify before Council on their proposed budget.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Troy Graham and Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Nutter administration officials said Wednesday that they would seek an additional $90 million in property taxes in 2012-2013 - but that it's not a tax hike. The new revenue would be collected as the city switches to a system that values property based on the actual market price for tax purposes. That change also would preserve tax hikes applied in each of the last two years, all of which had been billed as "temporary. " Mayor Nutter, who will lay out details of the city's Actual Value Initiative in his budget address Thursday to City Council, argues that the switch to actual value merely will take into account the rise in overall property values since 2004, the last time any kind of significant reassessment was done.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Would you like to know how much you're going to pay in property taxes before City Council passes a budget that depends largely on what it expects to collect from each property owner? Well, too bad. Not going to happen. Philadelphia is in the midst of its Actual Value Initiative (AVI), part of an endeavor to fix a historically inequitable tax system based on decades of bad and incomplete assessments. Assessors have fanned across the city in an attempt to tag each property with its market - actual - value.
NEWS
February 27, 2009 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The long-delayed overhaul of Philadelphia's property-tax assessment system will likely be put off for another year, Nutter administration officials said yesterday. The move postpones a politically difficult transition, which is expected to eventually lead to significantly higher property-tax bills for many Philadelphians and lower bills for others. But the delay will also preserve for at least another year what critics say is an inequitable and inaccurate system. Assessed property values in Philadelphia tend to be unduly high in poor neighborhoods and are frequently unrealistically low for residents of expensive neighborhoods.
NEWS
July 20, 2008 | By Allison Baker FOR THE INQUIRER
Taxpayers in the Oxford Area School District will be paying 14 percent more in property taxes this year, the highest percentage increase in Chester County,according to a survey of county districts. One of the main causes of the increase - a weak business base to ease the tax burden on homeowners - is the same curse that affects several other school districts in the county. In Oxford, the skyrocketing property taxes, combined with the rising costs of food, fuel and utilities and the sluggish economy are forcing some Oxford residents to ask hard questions.
NEWS
November 6, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Figurski, a retired sanitation worker, still lives in the house he grew up in, a narrow rowhouse on the 100 block of Carpenter Street in Queen Village. It is a neighborhood that has grown fashionable with cute bistros and desirable homes that now command $500,000. But because he is a homeowner, the 71-year-old Figurski is no different from his younger, more well-to-do neighbors - at least in the eyes of property assessors. And in 2007, after a change in tax assessments, he seems certain to be taxed like them, too. Houses on either side of Figurski's sold last year for $385,000 and $496,000, according to city records.
NEWS
March 28, 2003 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After township supervisors went before a packed house and explained why they raised township taxes 225 percent, resident John Thomas had this to say yesterday: "Either they are totally incompetent or totally dishonest. " The supervisors in this western Chester County township of 3,240 offered this explanation for the tax increase they enacted in November: They did not know what the tax rate was in their own township. They say they had recorded their millage rate incorrectly for five years, so it looked smaller than it actually was. That made a large tax increase palatable to them, they say, even though it actually made the township's taxes the highest in the county.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Responding to angry homeowners who were overbilled for their property taxes, Borough Secretary Kathleen Gamble said she mailed out about 300 refund checks yesterday, totaling just under $24,000. At a special meeting Monday night, the Borough Council voted to give taxpayers partial refunds. "The checks have been printed since Aug. 18," Gamble said. "I was just waiting for council to make a final decision. " The mistakes were made at the beginning of the year, when homeowners were incorrectly taxed at the rate of 6.983 mills, rather than the approved rate of 6.5. That month, a tax conversion table based on this year's countywide reassessment showed that the 6.5 rate was also too high.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|