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NEWS
November 30, 1999 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The township's successful challenge to Peco Energy Co.'s rates for streetlights will mean a small savings for residents next year. Under the proposed budget for fiscal 2000, which will become effective Jan. 1, residents will not have to pay the direct costs of streetlighting. And that change will save them an average of $36 in taxes next year, said Elaine Gibbs, finance director for Newtown Township. The $11 million budget, expected to be approved tomorrow night, calls for shifting the cost of streetlighting from a special fund to the town's general fund.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After three sessions of public hand-wringing and debate, the Council Rock school board will try to vote again tonight on a measure that would freeze taxes on property preserved as open space. This time, however, the school board will look at what some say is a lighter version of the original plan, written to suit its most vocal critics on the board. The original plan made many board members uncomfortable because it called for a permanent tax freeze on land that is forever restricted from development.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here it is, the number you've all been waiting for: 3.7 mills. That is Delaware County officials' first estimate of the county tax rate under the new market-value property assessments that take effect in 2000. The number may sound low to taxpayers who are used to a millage rate of 123.34, meaning they paid $123.34 for every $1,000 of assessed value. But the tax rate has not changed much, say county officials. Under the old assessment, the average property assessment was $3,930, just 3.3 percent of estimated market value.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Township officials are not proposing to raise taxes in 2000, but many homeowners can expect to pay more next year. Under a $16.6-million general-fund budget proposal presented Monday night to the Board of Commissioners, the typical property-tax bill would be about $65 more. The increase stems from the countywide property revaluation that will take effect in January, not from an increase in the millage rate. The revaluation means that the total value of the property the township can tax will increase from about $2.2 billion this year, to $2.9 billion next year.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Thirteen-year-old Thomas Bowen, a seventh grader at Stetson Middle School, has never browsed his school's Web site. In fact, Bowen said, he's never perused any Web site. That's because he does not have access to the Internet at home, and he is not getting it at school, he said. "But I also don't know how to use it. That's [another] thing," he added. Stetson has only a single computer with a connection to the Internet, and that computer is mostly reserved for staff, according to West Chester Area School District officials.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Former Mayor James F. Mollan Jr. was not around this year to veto the budget for 1999, as he did in the six previous years. He was voted out of office in 1997. Still, there was controversy, but the Borough Council passed the $3.3 million spending plan, with no tax increase, by a 5-2 vote this week. "I'm not happy with it," said Councilman John Byrne, who, along with Stanley Lindner, voted against the budget. "I felt like it was being rammed down our throats. " Byrne said he did not have enough time to review the final budget, which was given to council members only about an hour before the vote was taken.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In about two months, you will receive a letter that could change your life. If you own a home in Delaware County, that is. In March, new property-value assessments - preliminary valuations showing how much the county believes each home is worth - will arrive in mailboxes across the county. The final reassessment figure, along with the county, municipal and school property millage rates, will determine what the new tax bill will be. For the first time in memory, Delaware County, under a 1994 court order, is reassessing all 196,000 parcels at once.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | By Blair Clarkson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you blinked, you would have missed it. Last night, between deciding to buy new cleaning equipment and discussing proposed tax reforms at length, the Upper Merion school board elected a superintendent and approved the first budget in four years to require a tax increase. Only a handful of residents were there. None commented. "Last year, people were here and objecting all over the place," said board member Vince Vaccarello. "Now we have a tax increase, and no one comes. It's a little strange.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | By Meredith Dewey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Members of the Tredyffrin/Easttown school board have proposed a preliminary $56.5 million budget that could raise the property-tax bill on an average-priced home by $85. Board members voted 8-1 this week in favor of the tentative 1998-99 budget, which would increase school spending 3.8 percent over this year's $54.5 million budget. The recent revaluation of property in Chester County, which raised the value of average homes more than 16 times, changed the millage rate required to fund the proposed budget, school board members said.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | By Jen Gomez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Imagine that: township officials axing a $10 tax to save money. Next week, the Board of Supervisors expect to do just that by scrapping the per-capita tax, levied on residents 18 and older. This will not affect the property tax rate, which remained stable, because the countywide reassessment increased the assessed value of homes in the township by 10 percent. Instead, the trash collection fee will jump by $20 next year to cover the loss in revenue. It costs more, Whitemarsh officials found, to collect the head tax, often characterized as a nuisance, than any of its other tax revenue.
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