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Million Man March

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NEWS
May 7, 1996 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of New Jersey African Americans yesterday converged at the Statehouse in hopes of keeping alive the spirit of the Million Man March. Most of the men on hand attended the march held last fall, under much better weather conditions, in Washington. This time, organizers urged women and children to participate - and they did, despite cool temperatures and cloudy skies that held off rain until just before the end. The New Jersey Million Man March Coalition and the Black Ministers Council of New Jersey organized the statewide event.
NEWS
January 16, 1996 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
MILLION MAN MARCH Michael H. Cottman (Crown / $14) Boys' night out. Female bonding. St. Patty's Day parades. Gay Pride Week. Sometimes, separatism is good. Dividing in order to redefine unity can be a necessity in times of spiritual and moral crisis. Everyone needs that link to a cause, that camaraderie of a select group that can invoke love and allow the spread of love outside that realm. America's black men didn't have that special link until Oct. 16, 1995. Man, did the love pour out that day. An estimated 800,000 to 1.1 million black men came from across the nation, in some cases the world, to embrace each other like never before.
NEWS
October 27, 1995
It was an awakening to behold a sea of black men march in Washington on Oct. 16. My eyes filled with tears as my heart filled with pride, compassion, love and spiritual peace. It was truly a blessing to see so many of my sons, brothers and fathers sharing love and respect for one another. Never have so many stood for so much. Say what you will about Louis Farrakhan, he gets nothing but my respect for organizing this march. If you can take the good and bad in all others, why not him?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Today is the first anniversary of the Million Man March on Washington - and with it has come a wave of editorials on whether the rhetoric and aspirations of that unique day have resulted in measurable achievement. One tangible accomplishment is Spike Lee's Get on the Bus, a film that returns the director to the blunt and cutting honesty, pungent observation, and sharply targeted humor that made him so appealing in the first place. Filmed for $2.7 million invested by 15 prominent African American men, including Danny Glover, Wesley Snipes, Will Smith, Robert Guillaume, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. and the San Antonio Spurs' Charles D. Smith, Get on the Bus is a work of daunting challenges.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | By Richard Cohen
Colin Powell is often compared to Dwight Eisenhower and now, it turns out, the comparison is more apt than anyone might have imagined. As Ike did with Joe McCarthy so has Powell done with Minister Louis Farrakhan - ducked the chance to condemn. Invited personally by Farrakhan to participate in the Million Man March, Powell weakly responded that - dash it all - he had other plans. It seems Powell has the political bug after all - and it's weakened his backbone. It is with some reluctance that I reproach Powell, whom (the record will show)
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | BY DONNA BRITT
Whatever the Million Man March on Washington next month ultimately proves to its male participants and the world, it already has proved something to me: Black women's loyalty is amazing. I don't expect black men to agree. Despite numerous brothers' obvious respect for black women, I've heard too many others claim outrage at black women for "publicly attacking their men" and for the genderwide "betrayal" they see as exemplified by Desiree Washington and Anita Hill - women who accused good brothers Mike Tyson and Clarence Thomas of wrongdoing.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | BY RICHARD COHEN
A person can only be in one place at one time - and then, sometimes, not where he really wants to be. On Monday, I had been down to the Million Man March, talked to some people and then ambled back to my office, where I could watch the speeches in some comfort. About an hour into Louis Farrakhan's speech, I realized I was not where I wanted to be. I wanted to keep an eye on Jesse Jackson. In fact, I wanted to be in his head. I wanted to hear what he thought when Farrakhan returned, maybe for the third time, to the number 19 and its vast, although incomprehensible, importance.
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Jerome Dorn, of South Philadelphia, doesn't want to just walk in the Million Man March next Monday. He wants to walk to the historic event in Washington, D.C. Dorn, of Catharine Street near 24th, hopes his six-to-eight-day march will further dramatize Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan's call for atonement and unity within the black community. "I'm not a Muslim," Dorn said. "But I believe it's time that we stood up as black men and come back and take over our destiny and the destiny of our communities.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | BY RICHARD COHEN
Black manhood "needs to be reasserted," says Ron Walters, a political science professor at Howard University. To that end, he and other notable blacks are supporting the so-called Million Man March, whose organizers are Louis Farrakhan and Benjamin Chavis - one a racist and anti-Semite, the other an alleged sexual harasser. If this is asserting manhood then the children of Hamelin were mighty men one and all. They followed the Pied Piper right into the Weser River. The river Farrakhan and Chavis have in mind is the Potomac.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1996 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jerome Dorn has come up with a novel way to commemorate the five-day trek that 46 Philadelphia men made to reach the Million Man March last October in Washington: trading cards. Yesterday, the freelance photographer from South Philadelphia unveiled what he's titled the "Historic Walk" trading-card series. It's being issued by the One in a Million Walking Assn., a community-improvement group Dorn founded in October. The first in the planned series of 100 cards depicts the Philadelphia contingent, garbed in foul-weather gear and trash bags, trudging through a downpour on Route 1 near a sign reading "Washington, D.C. - 33 miles.
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NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
Minister Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam came to the birthplace of America on Sunday and, to thunderous applause, urged thousands of his followers to work with him "to build a new nation. " Speaking before an enthusiastic crowd in a cavernous ballroom at the Convention Center, Farrakhan delivered a message of separatism and self-reliance, urging African Americans to unite and buy land and start banks and build businesses and schools. Together, he said, they should strive to create a better future for their children and their communities - apart from their white brethren.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | BY WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
LONG BEFORE the tea party started to boil, and when some of the young protesters at Occupy Wall Street were still in kindergarten, there was a Million Man March on Washington , D.C., led by the fiery and controversial Minister Louis Farrakhan. Supporters of the 1995 effort that brought hundreds of thousands of black men to the National Mall are now the first to admit that while the march itself was a huge hit, the hoped-for aftermath - inner-city communities standing up against crime and decay, both physical and moral - didn't take root.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I've got to admit, when I met Ray Johnson and his two sons the other day, my first thought was, "Wow. So nice to see a strong black man with his children. " Whoa, hold up. Sometimes even I have to be mindful of beating back the prevailing notion of African American males as good-for-nothing deadbeat dads or ruthless thugs, because that's pretty much how they're portrayed, with few positive representations to balance it out. Truth is, Johnson embodies most of the black men I know - men who work hard every day, husbands who adore their wives, fathers who raise their children with equal amounts of discipline and love.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
MARC LAMONT Hill's May 25 column ( "Black Pols Vs. Pols Who are Black" ) may be accommodating to "whites," who he suggests may be "uncomfortable" with "race" talk - but he, conveniently, never made the point that there seems to be a double standard when it comes to the African-American vote. For example, it's said that Barack Obama is "everybody's president," not just the president of African-Americans. Yet not a single other president in U.S. history has ever had that standard of representing all voters, from the slave owner George Washington to Bill Clinton, who was president when the Million Man March occurred in 1995.
NEWS
August 31, 2010
THOUSANDS of pilgrims who once wandered in darkness were led to the light Saturday by God's man of the airwaves. At least, that's what happened at the "Restoring Honor" rally, to hear Glenn Beck tell it. "For too long, this country has wandered in darkness," Beck told a crowd estimated at between 87,000 and a half million. Not to worry, though. The anointed one has set us on a right path. "America today turns back to God," he declared. That was a load off my mind, until the next day when Beck turned back to his original calling, beating up on President Obama.
NEWS
April 10, 2008 | By RODNEY MUHAMMAD
THE "HATE that hate produced" was how Mike Wallace, a host of the news magazine "60 Minutes," chose to characterize the Nation of Islam in a segment years ago. The focus then was largely on Malcolm X, then chief spokesman for the Hon. Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam. Then, as now, the political and social contradictions in America were raised. And then, as now, something else remains consistent. Recently, the Philadelphia Inquirer carried a story classifying the Nation of Islam as a "hate group" based on a new study released by the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization formed in 1971 and based in Montgomery, Ala. (I wasn't able to get a response from anyone at the Inquirer about the article.
NEWS
September 15, 2007 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the number of homicides in Philadelphia this year approaching 300, black community activists yesterday announced that they are calling for 10,000 men to volunteer to deter violence by going into selected areas of the city to be a visible presence. "Every day, people are dying on our streets," Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson said as he was joined by about a dozen community leaders at a morning news conference at the Francis Myers Recreation Center at 58th Street and Kingsessing Avenue in Southwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 27, 2006
WHAT IS WITH us? We are letting our children be molested, murdered, abused, neglected. Black community, what's the problem? I am speaking to the black community because I am black, and I am angry! I have a daughter to raise, and it scares me to death to even think about her future. We used to stand together. We stood together at the Million Man March. Listening to Dr. King and Malcolm X, we stood together. We walked together, boycotting the buses. What happened? Now, we won't even watch out for each other's children.
NEWS
August 8, 2006
RE "Making cents of 'Party' " by Jenice M. Armstrong (Aug. 2): I've often wondered why many black non-profits and other groups that have fund-raisers have a hard time disclosing financial statements from the event. People have every right to know how much was raised, especially if the event pulled at the heartstrings of the people who supported it. Charlie Mack owes the public an accounting of his very public event. Just as he marketed and promoted the event's virtues, he should also promote and publicize the funds distributed.
NEWS
October 19, 2005 | By Claude Lewis
The speeches on the Mall in Washington on Saturday were wonderful. Thousands of African Americans gathered to hear them at the Millions More March, the 10th anniversary of the Million Man March. Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson, and survivors of Hurricane Katrina spoke. Nearly every speaker said once again precisely what needed to be said. But now what? Frankly, I'm tired of listening to speeches and hearing brave people blasting and boasting into microphones about how African Americans can gather in great numbers without violence and dissent.
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