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Million Woman March

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NEWS
October 18, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten years later, the women are going back to the Parkway. Organizers announced plans yesterday for a big anniversary celebration of the 1997 Million Woman March, which drew at least half a million people to Center City. The event will be held Oct. 25 from 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., centered at 21st and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "Whatever we do, when women get together, it gets done," said Paula Peebles, co-organizer of the celebration, called the "Sistahs of the Million Woman March.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last year, Phile Chionesu had the idea. What if, she said to her friend Asia Coney, they organized a women's march in Philadelphia, similar to the Million Man March that had drawn hundreds of thousands of African American men to Washington two years ago? Like Chionesu, Coney still felt the energy from the Million Man March. Both had been involved in march activities - Chionesu in Washington as a vendor, Coney as a volunteer in her South Philadelphia neighborhood, where she coordinated buses.
NEWS
October 21, 1997 | By Shannon Owens, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They can hear the call at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. They hear the rallying sounds way down at Howard University in Washington, D.C. And across New Jersey, young black women are preparing to gather in Philadelphia on Saturday. Kaida Flowers is a 20-year-old Philadelphia native who is bursting with energy, and this week it's all directed at recruiting people to attend the Million Woman March. At the mere mention of the event, her dreadlocked head starts shaking, and a smile spreads across her face.
NEWS
October 24, 1997
More than 30 years ago, huge numbers of men and women marched and demonstrated to alter public policy. For civil rights, against war. The overall goal: political change. While some of those efforts continue - the abortion issue is one example - by and large the participants in today's major marches and demonstrations are out there with a different goal. The Million Man March, the Promise Keepers' gatherings and tomorrow's planned Million Woman March in Philadelphia are not focused on changing the minds of lawmakers.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trisha Smith, 19, had just begun classes at the University of Michigan last fall when she learned that some women in Philadelphia were organizing a Million Woman March. Struggling to decide whether school was the right choice, she got on an eastbound bus and joined the sea of women streaming toward the Ben Franklin Parkway on a chilly, rainy Saturday. She was inspired. "When I was out there at the march and around all those beautiful, successful women who had struggled to make it professionally, I said, 'Hey, I'm going to stick with it and make something of myself, too.' " One year ago today, history was made in Philadelphia when Trisha Smith and hundreds of thousands - some estimates say more than one million - of black women, young and old, wealthy and poor, gathered on the parkway in a show of unity.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Sister Ma'at Ptah traveled to Philadelphia last October for the Million Woman March, she joined women from all over the country in sisterhood. As she watched the droves rally for social change on that day, she felt empowered, she said. She told herself that she would have the courage to make changes and help those changes yield results. Ptah returned to New Jersey and compared ideas for strengthening Burlington County with about a dozen other women, who have formed Daughters of African Descent.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | By Michael Vitez, Kristin Holmes and Shannon Owens, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the expected hundreds of thousands of women arrive here Saturday for the Million Woman March, they will owe their gratitude to dozens of weary volunteers. "We're exhausted," Sonya Jones, a national coordinator from South Philadelphia, said yesterday from headquarters in a state office building at 46th and Market, "but there's a lot of love in this building. " Organizers in the city and around the region worked hard yesterday to bring Saturday's scheduled rally closer to reality.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anticipating a gathering that could rival attendance at a large Independence Day celebration, city officials yesterday said they were preparing for a crowd of more than 500,000 at the Million Woman March next Saturday. Parking spaces for 6,000 cars and 2,200 buses are being set aside in and around Center City for the rally on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. SEPTA will provide shuttle service every five minutes from the parking areas to public transportation sites. Hundreds of police officers, many on overtime, will be on hand to help with traffic and crowd control.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | By Gwendolyn Crump, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Don't expect a huge "Waiting to Exhale" party at the Million Woman March in Philadelphia this fall. Organizers say that while they hope to promote sisterhood and self-empowerment, the primary goal of the Oct. 25 march will be to increase black women's involvement in their communities. The rally will mirror the 1995 Million Man March. "This is not intended to be some sort of male-bashing session," said organizer Sister Maat Inu Set Ptah, 49, of Burlington Township. "It serves as a reminder that women are the backbone of the black community.
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NEWS
October 31, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
LYDIA ANN Barashango, a licensed practical nurse who became a social worker and educator for several Philadelphia agencies, died Sept. 28 after a lengthy illness. She was 64 and was living in West River, Md., but had previously lived in East Oak Lane. Lydia was the sister of Mumia Abu-Jamal, who has been on death row since his conviction in the 1981 murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner. For many years, she was the leading family spokeswoman in efforts to win a new trial for Abu-Jamal, but in recent years, her health curtailed her activities, said her son, Vernon Wallace.
NEWS
October 18, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten years later, the women are going back to the Parkway. Organizers announced plans yesterday for a big anniversary celebration of the 1997 Million Woman March, which drew at least half a million people to Center City. The event will be held Oct. 25 from 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., centered at 21st and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "Whatever we do, when women get together, it gets done," said Paula Peebles, co-organizer of the celebration, called the "Sistahs of the Million Woman March.
NEWS
October 1, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathryn Fambro Woodard, 92, a treasure trove of history as the publisher of the former Philadelphia Independent, "The World's Greatest Negro Tabloid," died Monday at Manorcare Mercy-Fitzgerald in Yeadon, the city where she lived for more than 50 years. Mrs. Woodard, known as "Kitty" to friends, was thought to be Philadelphia's first woman newspaper publisher. As a nonstop crusader for civil rights, and an outspoken columnist, she used the power of the pen to inform and enlighten thousands of Independent readers.
NEWS
December 19, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomasina Robertson Hayward-Woodland, 55, a beautician who was the second sister in her family to succumb to breast cancer, died Sunday at her home in East Oak Lane. Mrs. Hayward-Woodland hid her condition from family members for five years and only told them about her illness before undergoing surgery last fall for a radical mastectomy. Mrs. Hayward-Woodland followed a path similar to one taken by her younger sister Elizabeth, who died in 1986 at 37. Elizabeth Robertson also didn't tell her family until the surgery.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | This is a shortened version of a column by Ray Didinger that appeared in the Daily News March 31, 1981
Big city. Big events. Like the national political conventions Philadelphia hosted in 1936, '40 and '48, and the upcoming GOP convention this summer. NCAA Final Fours. The 1979 papal visit. The historic Live Aid concert. The Million Woman March. The 1996 presidential summit on volunteerism. And a host of other events that have made Philadelphia the place to be over the last 75 years. At 8 p.m., the 70-year-old president lay in a Washington hospital with a bullet hole in his chest.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | By Christian Esch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosa Santiago is a loquacious, vibrant person, but she scrambles for words when it comes to the award she will receive in Philadelphia on Sunday for her work in the Latino community. She'd rather stay behind the scenes, she said. But, she added with a laugh, "I just happened to have the biggest mouth. " Santiago is one of 13 women to be honored at the first Latinas march, a celebration dedicated to the achievements of Latinas in this country. Organizers expect several thousand women from across the country to attend the event, which begins at noon at Fifth and Spring Garden Streets and ends at Huntingdon and American Streets.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | By Barbara Smith
Linda Wright Moore's column (Dec. 8) on black women's natural hair was very encouraging. I started my natural locks just before the Million Woman March in Philadelphia in October 1997. "Locks" is the popular term for natural hair sectioned and twisted. "Everything You Need to Know About Hairlocking" by Nekheria Evans gives information on the spiritual and historical nature of locks. Coily hair, she writes, clearly distinguishes people of African ancestry from all others. "Dreadlocks" relates specifically to a way of life that is known as Rastafarianism.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trisha Smith, 19, had just begun classes at the University of Michigan last fall when she learned that some women in Philadelphia were organizing a Million Woman March. Struggling to decide whether school was the right choice, she got on an eastbound bus and joined the sea of women streaming toward the Ben Franklin Parkway on a chilly, rainy Saturday. She was inspired. "When I was out there at the march and around all those beautiful, successful women who had struggled to make it professionally, I said, 'Hey, I'm going to stick with it and make something of myself, too.' " One year ago today, history was made in Philadelphia when Trisha Smith and hundreds of thousands - some estimates say more than one million - of black women, young and old, wealthy and poor, gathered on the parkway in a show of unity.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even though they are apart, they will always be together. That's what the organizers of last year's Million Woman March said yesterday at a town meeting where they announced that one organization is now two. Phile Chionesu and Asia Coney, the co-chairs of Million Woman Inc., which astonished the country by attracting hundreds of thousands of women to Benjamin Franklin Parkway last year, have gone their separate ways. Chionesu, who was the founder of the organization, will continue to run Million Woman Inc. Coney, and most of the original organizers for the march, have started a separate, but kindred, organization called Sisters of the Million Woman March.
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