CollectionsMilton Hershey School
IN THE NEWS

Milton Hershey School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
A 13-YEAR-OLD Delaware County honor-roll student was denied admission to the Milton Hershey School, which serves low-income students, because he's HIV positive, a federal discrimination lawsuit filed yesterday in Philadelphia alleges. The complaint came the day before World AIDS Day, noted Ronda Goldfein, executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, which filed the suit. The boy was told that his application would not be considered because "[the student's]
NEWS
February 16, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The multibillion-dollar Milton Hershey School for impoverished children will close its championship-caliber $17 million golf course, which is part of an investigation by the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office. The school said Thursday that as part of a campus expansion, it would seek municipal approval to construct student homes on the Hershey Links property, which was acquired at an inflated price in 2006 and was the subject of several Inquirer articles in 2010 and 2011. The Dauphin County school bought the unfinished golf course for $12 million, two to three times its independently appraised value, and then constructed a $5 million Scottish-themed bar and restaurant on it. School spokeswoman Lisa Scullin said Thursday, "The building presents a number of viable and useful options when it comes to future use. We are confident that we can utilize that structure in a way that benefits our students.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of the Milton Hershey School has apologized to an HIV-positive student who was denied admission because of his condition and said he was welcome to attend the residential school in the fall if he still wanted to. President Anthony Colistra said in a statement that he made the offer in a July 12 letter to the boy and his mother. The school originally said that its residential setting and the risk of sexual activity made the teen too much of a "threat. " The change of heart comes months after a lawsuit filed by the AIDS Law Project on behalf of the boy in November in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, alleging that the school violated the Americans With Disabilities Act, which includes HIV. The student, who is now 14 and lives in Delaware County where he attends public school, is considering the offer but is also looking at other options, said his lawyer, Ronda Goldfein.
NEWS
August 17, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
For the 100th time, students will assemble today for the first day of classes at an institution whose promotional literature boasts, "There is no other place like Milton Hershey School. " And it's true. Indeed, there is no other place on Earth quite like it. It is the world's wealthiest, largest residential school for students in prekindergarten through 12th grade, school officials say. It sprawls over 10,000 acres of rolling green hills and is centered on a domed, marble building.
NEWS
October 30, 2011 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Charney Jr. walked into the federal courthouse in Harrisburg 10 days ago and was sentenced to more than seven years in prison. The charge: possession of almost 700 images and 40 videos of child pornography. A vile crime in any circumstance, it is particularly chilling in the case of Charney. The 43-year-old, married and the father of two children, was responsible for the residential life of about 800 teenage students and was living on the campus of the Milton Hershey School for impoverished children.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | Will Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
NEVER underestimate the power of a journalist's instinct. In 2001, Philadelphia Inquirer business reporter Bob Fernandez was sent out to Hershey to get the "local angle" on a big, global story - the use of slave labor in the cocoa fields of West Africa that benefitted big chocolate makers, like the Pennsylvania-based Hershey Co. On that assignment, he recalled, he was surprised to learn that a controlling interest in the chocolate business...
NEWS
February 14, 2012
Any trial in the case of the Delaware County teenager who has sued the Milton Hershey School for denying him admission because he is HIV-positive should be held in Philadelphia, his attorney contends. The school has asked U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, where the suit was filed, to move the trial to Harrisburg, about 15 miles from the boarding school founded by the famous chocolate merchant, and thus closer to key witnesses involved in the day-to-day operation of the school.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
A story Sunday about the Hershey charity said Mary Louise Porter, general counsel of Hershey Trust Co., was fired. Hershey Trust spokeswoman Connie McNamara said Porter resigned Sept. 21 and was not fired. Porter remains employed as the general counsel and corporate secretary for the Milton Hershey School. A review Tuesday of The Venetian Twins omitted the name of the critic, Jim Rutter. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2015
ISSUE | GIRARD COLLEGE Hershey kisses Milton Hershey School's connection with Girard College stands strong, and, like Girard, Hershey prides itself on providing children with an opportunity to escape poverty ("Merger with Hershey would be sweet," June 16). We have collaborated with Girard for years and will continue to share our expertise. Like Stephen Girard, Milton and Catherine Hershey set out a clear vision of helping children succeed. Hershey visited Girard's campus, embracing some of his practices.
NEWS
June 17, 2015
ISSUE | LEARNING Shared effort Mayor Nutter points to compelling evidence that early learning contributes to long-term academic, social, and economic achievement ("Nutter, Kenney trumpet new push for early-childhood learning," June 3). The city's Running Start effort is built on the concept of collective impact to improve the well-being and academic prowess of young Philadelphians. Similarly, the Philadelphia Nurse-Family Partnership and its complementary home visitation models serve pregnant and parenting families until the youngest child reaches 5 years of age and enters school.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | Will Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
NEVER underestimate the power of a journalist's instinct. In 2001, Philadelphia Inquirer business reporter Bob Fernandez was sent out to Hershey to get the "local angle" on a big, global story - the use of slave labor in the cocoa fields of West Africa that benefitted big chocolate makers, like the Pennsylvania-based Hershey Co. On that assignment, he recalled, he was surprised to learn that a controlling interest in the chocolate business...
NEWS
May 9, 2015
ISSUE | SICK LEAVE Home rule forgotten I find it astounding that the rationale of State Sen. John Eichelberger (R., Blair) in trying to abolish Philadelphia's sick-pay law is that local governments should not be allowed to govern, when it's a core Republican value that local communities should be able to do so ("Phila. sick-leave law is praised," April 22). Furthermore, the state House majority leader's spokesman, Steve Miskin, contends that government should not interfere with the private sector.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a frozen Thursday in March, dawn turns the eastern sky a brilliant shade of pink. Doug Oliver doesn't get to see it. He's roaming the southbound subway platform at the Erie station, where no light can reach, having come not for a ride, but for votes. He's asking people to make him, a 40-year-old former public-relations executive who has never held public office, the next mayor of Philadelphia. He works fast, and not just because it's cold. Every seven minutes, the 40-some people on the platform are whisked away, replaced by another 40 who trickle downstairs for the next rush-hour train.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
DEESHA DYER has come a long way from her days of handing out free condoms at Fluid and other local nightclubs. These days, instead of trying to persuade partygoers to get themselves tested for HIV, she's in charge of all of the social functions at the White House. Yeah, you read that right. The White House as in 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. As the new White House social secretary, her job is to work closely with first lady Michelle Obama to compile guest lists for opulent dinners honoring visiting dignitaries such as Chinese President Xi Jinping, who's coming in September.
SPORTS
February 2, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHOENIX - Garry Gilliam approached his Seattle Seahawks teammates after catching a touchdown on a fake field goal to start the Seahawks' comeback in the NFC championship game and asked them, "Did that actually happen?" He could have been talking about more than the unlikely touchdown. Gilliam, a Harrisburg native who played for Penn State, reached the NFL after missing two seasons of college football because of a devastating knee injury and a subsequent staph infection, and switching positions for his last year of college.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By John W. Schmehl and F. Frederic Fouad
Upon his death in 1831, Stephen A. Girard, industrialist and philanthropist, endowed Philadelphia's Girard College with what was then the largest private charitable donation in U.S. history. Pursuant to the era's thinking on social problems, the facility housed and educated white male orphans, enabling them to achieve more productive lives. In 1968, the college was opened to minorities after a long legal struggle led by William T. Coleman Jr. of the law firm Dilworth Paxson, founded by a legendary reformist Philadelphia mayor.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
By Pablo Eisenberg The Pennsylvania attorney general's long-awaited investigative report on the scandalous conditions at the Milton Hershey School for poor children is, unfortunately, a whitewash. The fix appears to have been in, this time not by the Republican cabal that ran the school for 25 years, but by the newly elected attorney general, Kathleen Kane, and her fellow Democrats. It's clear that no one, and no party, wanted to challenge the powerful Hershey Trust, whose trustees manage the school, to make the changes needed at the institution.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|