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Milton Street

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NEWS
January 19, 2015
T. MILTON STREET SR.'S fighting spirit has not died, and neither has his desire to be mayor. The former state senator, 75, says he's poised to announce another run at the city's top job. Street garnered 36,000 votes in the 2011 Democratic primary. That's a not-too-shabby tally for a guy who served time in federal prison in 2008 for three misdemeanor counts of tax evasion. Street, the brother of former Mayor John Street, says he'll once again run on a platform to fight violence and empower the city's poor and downtrodden - those disregarded as "throw-aways.
NEWS
April 5, 2007 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
T. Milton Street Sr., Mayor Street's brother and mayoral candidate turned City Council hopeful, will have to wait longer to find out if he's staying on the ballot. He appeared in Commonwealth Court yesterday, defending himself against an eligibility challenge that he says is masterminded by his nephew and fellow City Council candidate Sharif Street. The court's judgment is expected next week. To the surprise of many, Milton Street prevailed in a Common Pleas Court decision last month.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By MATT RUBEN
MILTON STREET: What's there to say about him that he hasn't already said about himself? How about this: If Milton were running for national office, I think he'd actually be a Republican. It seems crazy that someone who speaks out for the rights of ex-cons (a platform plank I agree with) and who finds much of his support in communities of color would be a member of the GOP. I don't say this for partisan reasons, but Street's mayoral campaign is taking a page from the Republican playbook: Here's a guy who's amassed millions of dollars over the years speaking on behalf of everyday folks.
NEWS
June 18, 2003 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a white-stucco office building in Essington, the computers were booted up yesterday morning, the bare walls shone under fluorescent lights, and the empty bins in the garage awaited spare parts for airport baggage carousels. Milton Street was ready for business. But instead of taking over the maintenance of equipment at Philadelphia International Airport yesterday as planned, Street was on the phone scrambling to find a lawyer to represent him in what he considers an inevitable court battle against his brother, the mayor of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 1, 2011
RE ELMER Smith's recent column on my father, T. Milton Street: It didn't mention any of his accomplishments as a state senator or representative. It mentioned antics, not substance. If you only admire him for the theatrics, you admire him for the wrong reason. State Sen. Street was a visionary, ahead of his time. He predicted years ago the problems the city would face with the funding for public education and submitted a bill for games of chance - that was substance. Now, 25 years later, we have just that.
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
Mayor Nutter has drawn second position to Milton Street for the May 17 primary ballot. Ballot positions for other races also are being drawn in Room 676 at City Hall. Nutter took his 2d place position in the Democratic race in stride. "I do have full confidence the voters will be able to find my name on the ballot," he said. Follow reports on the drawing at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/heardinthehall/ .
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
A well-known public servant is off to serve his country. T. Milton Street Jr., who once helped his father seize a courtroom, will now try to take Kuwait. Street's U.S. Army reserve unit, the 1018th Reception Battalion out of Fort Dix, N.J., has been activated and is being shipped to Saudi Arabia today. Yesterday, Street, 24, and his father T. Milton Street Sr., the former state senator, returned to Traffic Court, scene of their epic political struggle last November over unpaid traffic tickets.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although Mayor Nutter captured the Democratic nomination Tuesday, the nettlesome fact remains that a recent convict who owes nearly $800,000 in taxes snatched one of every four votes from a reformist mayor who four years ago drew crowds to City Hall just to shake his hand. Nutter interpreted the 24 percent of voters who backed T. Milton Street Sr. as a reflection of an electorate angry with a shortage of jobs and rising costs, a ripple effect of the national economic crunch. But one person with a different view is John F. Street.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Troy Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moments after being told Monday that he could remain on the ballot, a buoyant T. Milton Street Sr. made a bold prediction about the outcome of any future debate with his nemesis, Mayor Nutter. "I am going to crush him like a bug," Street said, drawing laughter from a circle of supporters. "He has no shot, trust me. The mayor cannot debate with Milton Street and win. " Street, a former hot dog vendor, state senator, and federal convict, is now officially on the ballot and remains the only candidate challenging Nutter in the May 17 primary.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although Mayor Nutter captured the Democratic nomination Tuesday, the nettlesome fact remains that a recent convict who owes nearly $800,000 in taxes snatched one of every four votes from a reformist mayor who four years ago drew crowds to City Hall just to shake his hand. Nutter interpreted the 24 percent of voters who backed T. Milton Street Sr. as a reflection of an electorate angry with a shortage of jobs and rising costs, a ripple effect of the national economic crunch. But one person with a different view is John F. Street.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
LET'S TALK about spicing up the mayor's race. Lord knows it needs a little flavor. So I'm soliciting ideas from the silly (a cheesesteak-eating contest?) to the sensational (candidates strapped to polygraphs questioning each other?). Actually, either of those would be better than what we've seen so far. I mean, how helpful is chatter about Milton Street's registration or residency? Or whether Tony Williams' wife's job is an issue in his campaign? We need to find, as Mayor Nutter might say, "a new day, a new way" for the race.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | William Bender, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S BALLOT-CHALLENGE season in Philadelphia, when spring is in the air and candidates launch quasi-anonymous pre-emptive strikes at each other. Why take a chance trying to beat your opponent fair and square when one of your cronies can get him or her kicked off the ballot two months before Election Day? This time-honored political tradition was on display in City Hall yesterday leading up to the 5 p.m. deadline for challenging candidates' nomination petitions, residency or other issues that could render them ineligible to appear on the ballot.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Does T. Milton Street Sr., an irrepressible Philadelphian, actually reside in New Jersey? Street on Monday became the first candidate to have his spot on the May 19 Philadelphia mayoral primary ballot challenged in court. A former state senator, Street filed nomination petitions last week to run for mayor as a Democrat, though city and state records list him as a registered independent since 2012. The legal challenge filed Monday cites Street's registration - and also claims he has lived in New Jersey since 2012.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
T. Milton Street Sr. is hoping that the third time truly will be a charm. After the weather twice derailed his plans to formally announce a run for the Democratic mayoral nomination, Street managed to pull off the campaign tradition Thursday evening at New Jerusalem Baptist Church in North Philadelphia. The question remains, however, whether he will be able to stay on the ballot until the May 19 primary. Street changed his voter registration in 2012 to "independent" to unsuccessfully run in a special election for the 197th District state House seat.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
T. Milton Street Sr. certainly presents himself as independent-minded. He has the voter registration to back that up. Street, a former state senator who served 26 months in federal prison for unpaid taxes before running for mayor in 2011, filed nominating petitions Tuesday to run again for mayor, as a Democrat. One problem: The city Board of Elections lists him as a registered "independent," not a Democrat. "I changed that a long time ago," Street said Wednesday when alerted to his registration status.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean & Ryan Briggs, Daily News Staff Writer, The Next Mayor
ON WHAT COULD have been a low-key afternoon of Philadelphia mayoral candidates dropping off petition signatures to get their names on the May 19 primary ballot yesterday, T. Milton Street instead threw bombs at a fellow candidate, state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams. Street, the last of the six remaining Democratic mayoral candidates to drop off petitions at City Hall by yesterday's deadline, charged that Williams had submitted at least 6,000 fraudulent signatures, which, Street said, constituted a pattern of fraud that should result in the senator being kicked off the ballot.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
IT'S PROBABLY safe to assume that T. Milton Street Sr . is not destined to be our next mayor. But maybe he's not even destined to be a candidate. The 73-year-old tax-evading former state senator said in early January that he'd be launching his mayoral campaign at a funeral parlor in a couple weeks. Then, he decided to do it at a church. But the Rev. Keith Goodman , pastor of one of the churches he was eying for the event, kept dodging his calls. Goodman, perhaps not coincidentally, is now running for mayor himself.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
MAYORAL HOPEFUL T. Milton Street Sr., self-described champion of the "little guy," finally filed his campaign-finance report with the County Board of Elections yesterday. And surprise! (OK, maybe not.) Street's report - filed six days past the deadline, along with a $130 fine - lists a single cash donation of $2,900 from deep-pocketed developer Ori Feibush. At first blush, it may seem an odd alliance, although both are political outsiders. Feibush, a City Council candidate who has donated at least $250,000 to his own campaign fund, is at ground zero of the debate over the gentrification of historically poverty-stricken neighborhoods such as Point Breeze.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may appear that James F. Kenney, who resigned from Philadelphia City Council last week to run for mayor, has the edge on other Democratic candidates when it comes to marijuana policy. But former State Sen. T. Milton Street Sr. got the jump on Kenney by introducing state legislation 32 years ago to decriminalize the cultivation and consumption of the drug. "Maybe we can say I was ahead of my time," Street said Tuesday, laughing about the issue finally sparking up. Kenney's stance and Street's response prompted The Inquirer to poll the half-dozen declared and likely mayoral candidates about their views on decriminalizing pot - and about whether they had ever used the drug.
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