CollectionsMilton Street
IN THE NEWS

Milton Street

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 19, 2015
T. MILTON STREET SR.'S fighting spirit has not died, and neither has his desire to be mayor. The former state senator, 75, says he's poised to announce another run at the city's top job. Street garnered 36,000 votes in the 2011 Democratic primary. That's a not-too-shabby tally for a guy who served time in federal prison in 2008 for three misdemeanor counts of tax evasion. Street, the brother of former Mayor John Street, says he'll once again run on a platform to fight violence and empower the city's poor and downtrodden - those disregarded as "throw-aways.
NEWS
April 5, 2007 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
T. Milton Street Sr., Mayor Street's brother and mayoral candidate turned City Council hopeful, will have to wait longer to find out if he's staying on the ballot. He appeared in Commonwealth Court yesterday, defending himself against an eligibility challenge that he says is masterminded by his nephew and fellow City Council candidate Sharif Street. The court's judgment is expected next week. To the surprise of many, Milton Street prevailed in a Common Pleas Court decision last month.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By MATT RUBEN
MILTON STREET: What's there to say about him that he hasn't already said about himself? How about this: If Milton were running for national office, I think he'd actually be a Republican. It seems crazy that someone who speaks out for the rights of ex-cons (a platform plank I agree with) and who finds much of his support in communities of color would be a member of the GOP. I don't say this for partisan reasons, but Street's mayoral campaign is taking a page from the Republican playbook: Here's a guy who's amassed millions of dollars over the years speaking on behalf of everyday folks.
NEWS
June 18, 2003 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a white-stucco office building in Essington, the computers were booted up yesterday morning, the bare walls shone under fluorescent lights, and the empty bins in the garage awaited spare parts for airport baggage carousels. Milton Street was ready for business. But instead of taking over the maintenance of equipment at Philadelphia International Airport yesterday as planned, Street was on the phone scrambling to find a lawyer to represent him in what he considers an inevitable court battle against his brother, the mayor of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 1, 2011
RE ELMER Smith's recent column on my father, T. Milton Street: It didn't mention any of his accomplishments as a state senator or representative. It mentioned antics, not substance. If you only admire him for the theatrics, you admire him for the wrong reason. State Sen. Street was a visionary, ahead of his time. He predicted years ago the problems the city would face with the funding for public education and submitted a bill for games of chance - that was substance. Now, 25 years later, we have just that.
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
Mayor Nutter has drawn second position to Milton Street for the May 17 primary ballot. Ballot positions for other races also are being drawn in Room 676 at City Hall. Nutter took his 2d place position in the Democratic race in stride. "I do have full confidence the voters will be able to find my name on the ballot," he said. Follow reports on the drawing at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/heardinthehall/ .
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
A well-known public servant is off to serve his country. T. Milton Street Jr., who once helped his father seize a courtroom, will now try to take Kuwait. Street's U.S. Army reserve unit, the 1018th Reception Battalion out of Fort Dix, N.J., has been activated and is being shipped to Saudi Arabia today. Yesterday, Street, 24, and his father T. Milton Street Sr., the former state senator, returned to Traffic Court, scene of their epic political struggle last November over unpaid traffic tickets.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although Mayor Nutter captured the Democratic nomination Tuesday, the nettlesome fact remains that a recent convict who owes nearly $800,000 in taxes snatched one of every four votes from a reformist mayor who four years ago drew crowds to City Hall just to shake his hand. Nutter interpreted the 24 percent of voters who backed T. Milton Street Sr. as a reflection of an electorate angry with a shortage of jobs and rising costs, a ripple effect of the national economic crunch. But one person with a different view is John F. Street.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although Mayor Nutter captured the Democratic nomination Tuesday, the nettlesome fact remains that a recent convict who owes nearly $800,000 in taxes snatched one of every four votes from a reformist mayor who four years ago drew crowds to City Hall just to shake his hand. Nutter interpreted the 24 percent of voters who backed T. Milton Street Sr. as a reflection of an electorate angry with a shortage of jobs and rising costs, a ripple effect of the national economic crunch. But one person with a different view is John F. Street.
NEWS
February 27, 2007 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
T. Milton Street Sr. - running for Philadelphia mayor and under indictment - has parted ways with his court-appointed attorney. Street, 67, appeared in federal court yesterday to allow Jeanne Damirgian, a former federal prosecutor, to withdraw as his counsel in the government's corruption and tax evasion case against him. Damirgian told U.S. District Court Judge Legrome D. Davis that she had proposed legal strategies for Street's defense, but...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
T. Milton Street Sr., the perennial candidate and former federal prison inmate, will not seek to become the Republican nominee for the Second Congressional District. Instead, he will become campaign chairman for James Jones, who ran unopposed in the April Republican primary election. Street and Jones flirted publicly in a Facebook post Sunday with the notion that Jones would withdraw and Street would seek to replace him. That caused consternation among Republican officials, but also drew some media attention to an otherwise sleepy campaign by Jones.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
Could T. Milton Street Sr., the perennial Philadelphia candidate who once went to jail for unpaid taxes, become the Republican nominee for a seat in the House? Stay tuned. Street and James Jones, the GOP nominee in the Second Congressional District, announced on Facebook that they would declare Tuesday which of them will run against the Democrats' nominee, State Rep. Dwight Evans, for a two-year term. "After a series of discussions, Street and Jones have joined forces as one to address the issues" of the district, the Sunday posting said.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
T. Milton Street Sr.'s path to appear on an Election Day ballot may pass through a Philadelphia courtroom for the third time in five years. Street, a former state senator who served time in federal prison for unpaid taxes, and ran for mayor in 2011 and 2015, announced Monday that he will run as an independent for the Second Congressional District seat in the Nov. 8 general election. Just one problem: Street has been a registered Republican since January. The Pennsylvania Election Code says independent candidates must leave their political parties at least 30 days before the primary election to be eligible to appear on the general election ballot.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
T. Milton Street Sr., the Pennsylvania-state-senator-turned-federal-inmate-turned-two-time-Philadelphia-mayoral-candidate, has a new challenge in mind: Running as an independent for the House. Street on Monday said he would run for the Second Congressional District seat in the Nov. 8 general election. He would face State Rep. Dwight Evans, a Democrat, and Republican James Jones. Street, 77, said a formal announcement would come in two weeks. He must collect by Aug. 1 nomination petitions signed by 3,623 people registered to vote in the district, which covers parts of Philadelphia and Montgomery County.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Christine M. Flowers, Daily News Columnist
DEAR MAYOR-ELECT Kenney: I wanted to take this opportunity to congratulate you on your surprise, come-from-behind win this past week. I know it must have been a complete shock that you actually squeaked by the Republican candidate, given the scrutiny the Democratic voters in Philadelphia always give to their own. Fortunately, after a lot of serious concentration at the polls, your tenacity and welcoming message to those who disagree with you persuaded...
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Kenney, a 23-year veteran of City Council and true son of South Philadelphia, rolled to an easy victory Tuesday in the Democratic mayoral primary, making him the odds-on favorite to become Philadelphia's next chief executive. Backed by an impressive coalition of organized labor, progressive groups, and key African American political leaders, Kenney, 56, defeated former District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham, former Common Pleas Judge Nelson A. Diaz, former PGW executive Doug Oliver, former State Sen. T. Milton Street, and the candidate once seen as the front-runner - State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | Joseph Brandt, Dan Spinelli & Annie Palmer, Daily News Staff Writers
ANTHONY Hardy Williams worked the Center City lunchtime crowd after someone slashed his wife's car tire outside their West Philly home overnight. Lynne Abraham dodged a heckler during a meet-and-greet at the Clothespin near City Hall. Nelson Diaz chatted up commuters with a former U.S. transportation secretary in his entourage. Jim Kenney tweeted. Doug Oliver talked with North Philly subway riders and attended a health fair. Milton Street hit busy street corners and said that a huge upset was looming.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
IT LOOKS AS IF today's election might be the one, at least the rare one, in which values outweigh race or ethnicity. Generally, but not always, we vote for people who look like us. It is racial, but not racist. We gravitate toward those who are like us because we feel they will understand us. It is tribal, something buried in the deep recesses of our reptilian brains. Not everyone does that, of course. In recent decades, liberal whites have been more open to voting across the color line than Philly blacks.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
THE MAYOR'S race keeps drawing Zzzzs; today we offer Yyyys. Why have six Democratic candidates for an open seat in a Democratic city been unable to generate voter enthusiasm? Pollsters could actually change one choice from "undecided" to "uninterested" and run up a pretty big number. Why is turnout likely to be lower than in the last three open-seat primaries? (It was 49 percent in 1991 when Ed Rendell won a four-way race; 35 percent in '99 when John Street won a six-way; 33 percent in '07 when Michael Nutter won a five-way.)
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Daily News Editorial
PHILADELPHIA, at the center of a convergence of growth, positive attention and forward movement, is having a moment. While still beset with big problems, we can more easily stand with other modern cities - no longer corrupt and content, no longer in thrall to pay to play, patronage, ethical shortcomings and soul-killing bureaucratic indifference, much of which can be credited to Mayor Nutter's past seven years. Interviewing candidates, and attending some of the countless debates and forums to weigh our choice for the Democratic choice for next mayor, we have focused a key question: Who is most likely to keep the momentum going?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|