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NEWS
February 10, 1993 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hazel Tidwell, a sturdy woman with a sharp chin and a fondness for boiled hog's head, stood on her porch and shouted some country advice to the man who had come to drill for oil on her piece of mountain. "Now, buddy," said Tidwell, who gets her water by dropping a bucket on rusty chain down a cinderblock well, "you go up there again and I'll get my .22 caliber and you just might have some holes in your britches. I'm still a good shot. " The man turned his white pickup truck around and headed back down the muddy road, past coal bins and rabbit cages, over Tolby Creek and out of the harsh, rocky hollow that Tidwell's been guarding for more than 60 years.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Marcellus Shale natural gas discovery has triggered an associated boom in Pennsylvania land disputes, as formerly valueless mineral rights are now potentially worth millions. The heirs of a Centre County landowner asked the Pennsylvania Supreme Court this month to resolve a case that stripped them of their 19th-century mineral rights, now claimed by a hunting club that bought the land in 1959. The convoluted legal question affects the natural resources beneath huge expanses of timberland in the heart of the Marcellus Shale, which now accounts for nearly a quarter of the nation's natural gas production.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Environmental activists are pressuring the state to restrict Marcellus Shale drilling on 18,780 acres in a popular recreational area of northern Pennsylvania, where they say the state has a rare opportunity to control natural-gas extraction because of a 1933 deed restriction. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is being pressed to put the brakes on gas development in the Loyalsock State Forest, where an exploration company has begun staking out drilling locations near the Old Loggers Path, a 27-mile loop trail that DCNR says "offers stunning vistas and clear, cold, cascading streams.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Corbett on Friday signed an executive order lifting a 2010 moratorium on leasing additional state forests for Marcellus Shale natural-gas development, but it prohibits new leasing that would cause additional surface disturbances. The order puts into effect a promise the governor made in February to generate $75 million for state coffers by leasing Department of Conservation and Natural Resources lands adjacent to public and private land already under existing leases that can be developed using horizontal drilling.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania conservation officials have invited about 30 state and local leaders to rural Sullivan County on Thursday to explain the complex negotiations underway over Marcellus Shale drilling in Loyalsock State Forest. But most of the environmental activists who are pressuring the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) to restrict drilling in the forest were not invited to the private meeting. The organizations, including Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future, have asked DCNR to block Anadarko Petroleum Corp.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania conservation officials have invited about 30 state and local leaders to rural Sullivan County on Thursday to explain the complex negotiations under way over Marcellus Shale drilling in Loyalsock State Forest. But most of the environmental activists who are pressuring the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) to restrict drilling in the forest were not invited to the private meeting. The organizations, including Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future, have asked DCNR to block Anadarko Petroleum Corp.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Corbett administration, having just taken a step to make it easier to drill for natural gas on state lands, says it will soon take another, bigger step in that direction. Gov. Corbett plans to lift the moratorium his predecessor imposed in October on new natural-gas drilling in state forests and parks. It's just a matter of time, his spokesman said Tuesday. Spokesman Kevin Harley said the governor believes there should be drilling on publicly held lands, and called former Gov. Ed Rendell's moratorium a political move made on the heels of the legislature's failure to enact a tax on natural gas extracted from the Marcellus Shale formation.
NEWS
October 27, 2010
THE FOSSIL-fuel industry always promises to bring jobs and prosperity, but the promise always proves false. For 150 years, coal has been extracted from West Virginia, yet West Virginia is 48th in the nation in terms of per-capita income. The state is in effect a sort of Third World nation, the coal being exported for use elsewhere while the state receives little in return beyond environmental devastation. Pennsylvania is about to follow the same route with Marcellus shale natural gas. The only beneficiaries will be the minority of those who own most of the mineral rights, so we might as well get at least some benefit by taxing the extraction process.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Rendell signed an executive order Tuesday that bans further leasing of state forests for Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling, a move lauded by environmentalists but shrugged off by Republicans as the symbolic effort of a lame-duck leader. Rendell, who will leave office in January, signed the moratorium in a bitter denouement to the legislature's failure to enact a natural gas severance tax, which left Democrats and Republicans blaming each other for the breakdown. The governor underscored the overt political nature of Tuesday's signing ceremony at Penn Treaty Park in Philadelphia by using the occasion as a call to action in next Tuesday's legislative and gubernatorial elections.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Environmental advocates are applying pressure on the Wolf administration to broaden restrictions on natural gas drilling on Pennsylvania state lands. Gov. Wolf's Jan. 29 moratorium on new gas leasing, signed on his 10th day in office and hailed by environmentalists, had symbolic importance, but it went only so far. The ban undid a limited Corbett administration policy that allowed new leasing of lands where no surface disturbance was involved. Corbett's executive order, which was never carried out, affected a relatively small universe of public lands that could be accessed from neighboring tracts where drilling is already permitted.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Environmental advocates are applying pressure on the Wolf administration to broaden restrictions on natural gas drilling on Pennsylvania state lands. Gov. Wolf's Jan. 29 moratorium on new gas leasing, signed on his 10th day in office and hailed by environmentalists, had symbolic importance, but it went only so far. The ban undid a limited Corbett administration policy that allowed new leasing of lands where no surface disturbance was involved. Corbett's executive order, which was never carried out, affected a relatively small universe of public lands that could be accessed from neighboring tracts where drilling is already permitted.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Marcellus Shale natural gas discovery has triggered an associated boom in Pennsylvania land disputes, as formerly valueless mineral rights are now potentially worth millions. The heirs of a Centre County landowner asked the Pennsylvania Supreme Court this month to resolve a case that stripped them of their 19th-century mineral rights, now claimed by a hunting club that bought the land in 1959. The convoluted legal question affects the natural resources beneath huge expanses of timberland in the heart of the Marcellus Shale, which now accounts for nearly a quarter of the nation's natural gas production.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Corbett on Friday signed an executive order lifting a 2010 moratorium on leasing additional state forests for Marcellus Shale natural-gas development, but it prohibits new leasing that would cause additional surface disturbances. The order puts into effect a promise the governor made in February to generate $75 million for state coffers by leasing Department of Conservation and Natural Resources lands adjacent to public and private land already under existing leases that can be developed using horizontal drilling.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 1,486 acres of Pennsylvania state forest land has been converted to roads, pipelines, and well pads for Marcellus Shale natural gas development, according to a state monitoring report that will be released Wednesday. Drilling companies have upgraded or constructed 161 miles of roads in state forests, including 30 miles of new roads. They also have cut 104 miles of pipeline corridors in the forests. The 265-page monitoring report, prepared by the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR)
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania conservation officials, who are in the hot seat over a proposal to open Loyalsock State Forest for Marcellus Shale gas development, have agreed to hold public informational sessions on drilling plans for the popular recreational area. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources will participate in a free, web-based seminar Thursday on gas-development options for the state forest, which is in Lycoming, Bradford, and Sullivan Counties near Williamsport. The department also says it is planning a public meeting on the forest at an unspecified date.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania conservation officials have invited about 30 state and local leaders to rural Sullivan County on Thursday to explain the complex negotiations under way over Marcellus Shale drilling in Loyalsock State Forest. But most of the environmental activists who are pressuring the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) to restrict drilling in the forest were not invited to the private meeting. The organizations, including Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future, have asked DCNR to block Anadarko Petroleum Corp.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania conservation officials have invited about 30 state and local leaders to rural Sullivan County on Thursday to explain the complex negotiations underway over Marcellus Shale drilling in Loyalsock State Forest. But most of the environmental activists who are pressuring the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) to restrict drilling in the forest were not invited to the private meeting. The organizations, including Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future, have asked DCNR to block Anadarko Petroleum Corp.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Environmental activists are pressuring the state to restrict Marcellus Shale drilling on 18,780 acres in a popular recreational area of northern Pennsylvania, where they say the state has a rare opportunity to control natural-gas extraction because of a 1933 deed restriction. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is being pressed to put the brakes on gas development in the Loyalsock State Forest, where an exploration company has begun staking out drilling locations near the Old Loggers Path, a 27-mile loop trail that DCNR says "offers stunning vistas and clear, cold, cascading streams.
NEWS
September 3, 2011 | By Jacqueline Feldman and Rebecca Droke, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Bob and Marlene Cook's home in Belle Vernon, southeast of Pittsburgh, was built in the 1770s by Bob's great-great-great grandfather, Col. Edward Cook. In Cook family lore, a broad, flat stone placed by the porch was where George Washington once stood to address his troops. Another stone once marked the grave of Edward Cook, who finished building the stone house at the heart of the Fayette County farm in 1776. Bob Cook, 75, lives on the 350-acre property now. He owns the stone house, but the bulk of the land is divided among 12 Cook heirs, who live as far away as Florida, Washington, Maine, and California.
NEWS
April 30, 2011
Those who benefit should pay for sand Anthony R. Wood's article on Monday ("Should nation's taxpayers be paying for beach-fill efforts?") poses an interesting question, the answer to which is no. We have been pumping sand every year at a cost of millions of dollars in order to preserve beachfront properties whose owners knew the sand would erode when they bought them. These homeowners should be responsible for their own property. Boardwalk shop owners and the local municipality can also contribute to the upkeep.
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