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Minimum Wage

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NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By VINCENT HUGHES
THE FEDERAL government has decided that a minimum-wage increase is not a priority. With the recent defeat by Congress of two proposals to raise the minimum wage, it is imperative that Pennsylvania find a way to raise its minimum wage on a state or local level. This is exactly what Philadelphia Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. has done. The recent passage by City Council's Committee on Commerce and Economic Development of a proposal introduced by Councilman Goode requiring city-supported employers to pay at least 150 percent of the state minimum wage to its employees, is commendable.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
About 500 people from various labor and unemployment coalitions rallied on the west steps of the Capitol yesterday to appeal to Congress to boost the $3.35-an-hour federal minimum wage. "We elect these people and they come up here and pay no attention to our needs," said Jim Carson, director of the People's Coalition in St. Louis. "They slip their pay raises through with no problems. " Labor subcommittees in both houses are considering legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage to $4.65 an hour over about three years.
NEWS
April 22, 2005 | By Craig Garthwaite
Craig Garthwaite is director of research at the Employment Policies Institute As Gov. Rendell and state legislators consider a proposal for a $7 an hour minimum wage, they should also bear in mind Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan's warning that such a move "prevents people who are at the early stages of their careers . . . from getting a foothold in the ladder of promotions. " Wage-hike proponents often argue that minimum-wage employees haven't had a raise since Congress last increased the national rate.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
RE YOUR EDITORIAL on the minimum wage and the debate on whether it should be raised: I hear all the time about how raising the minimum wage will hurt the people it is intended to help. Why is it that when union members get a raise, when state legislators give themselves a pay raise in the middle of the night, federal officials vote themselves a raise, CEOs (think Exxon-Mobil) and all other workers get a raise, the economy and minimum-wage workers are not adversely affected? But when people living in poverty are given pay raises, the economy and these workers suffer?
BUSINESS
April 10, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ask any worker earning the minimum wage if he or she would like a pay raise, and odds are good the answer will be yes. After all, at $3.35 an hour - $134 a week, $6,968 a year - the federal minimum wage isn't much. And because it hasn't been raised since January 1981, inflation has eroded its buying power by 30 percent. Ask the same worker if he or she would like to be fired or have work hours cut back, however, and the answer probably will be no. But the worker can't have the raise without risking the loss.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By CHRISTINE M. TARTAGLIONE
WHEN THE clock expired at the end of the Super Bowl, a lot of so-called experts turned out to be wrong. The game is played on the field, and that often has a funny way of defying ill-placed prediction. Overshadowed perhaps by football, but even more important to millions of Pennsylvanians, was the January debunking of forecasts by experts even more certain than football commentators. Two years ago, during an intense debate over Pennsylvania's eroding minimum wage, the big-business lobby and some misled lawmakers were touting the work of a Florida economist who had supposedly studied Pennsylvania's labor market and come to the conclusion that adjusting the minimum wage for inflation would be disastrous for low-wage workers.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
STATE SEN. Tina Tartaglione is to be commended for her commitment to helping low-wage workers. But her plan to have government dictate to business that each year it must pay workers more, regardless of a business' ability to do so, would actually further limit hiring opportunities for these workers. Unfortunately, supporters of a minimum wage cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) fail to realize this because they refuse to acknowledge that the recent minimum-wage hike had any negative impact.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officers of the Oxford Circle Civic Association urged members to attend a rally at state Sen. Hank Salvatore's office next Thursday to show support for a bill raising the minimum wage and to protest the senator's vote on the measure. Joan Somers, the association's director of community affairs, said Tuesday night that the state Senate recently voted 25-24 against raising Pennsylvania's minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.65 an hour over the next three years. She said that Salvatore voted against the measure, which already had passed in the House.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
The big progressive issue of campaign 2000 was previewed in Washington state Nov. 3, but no one in the rest of the country noticed. By a 68 percent majority, voters approved an initiative that hikes the minimum wage to $6.50 an hour by 2000, and then - for the first time ever - indexes it to rise each year with the cost of living. If ever there was an idea whose time has come, this is it. Inflation has eroded the minimum wage to the point where even 1996's two-step federal "increase" to $5.15 has left that wage with less purchasing power than it had in the late 1970s.
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BUSINESS
October 31, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Struggling to keep her tears under control, Cleotilde Tiacopilco described a day on the job at Olympic Linen & Laundry Service in Lansdowne: Start at 8 a.m., clean 5,000 napkins, put them in a machine, then count and pack them. Finish by 6 p.m., then spend the next hour or so cleaning the office and the bathroom. Her pay over 12 years? No overtime and $5 an hour until November 2013, when she got a raise to $6.50, she said at a news conference held in City Hall on Thursday to announce the filing of a wage-and-hour lawsuit against the company.
NEWS
October 30, 2014
ISSUE | PRISON FILE Six who stood up As the mother of one inmate, I thank The Inquirer for its coverage of the six State Correctional Institution at Dallas inmates who blew the whistle on coerced suicide and abuse at the prison in Luzerne County ("Advocates for 6 prisoners in Phila. to seek support," Oct. 25). I also offer this clarification so that readers understand the impossibility of rioting from solitary confinement: Neither then-inmate Derrick Stanley nor any of the other men still confined were outside their solitary-confinement cells.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Thursday stood by comments earlier this week - criticized by Democrats - that he was "tired" of efforts to raise the minimum wage. "I'm going to be very clear, and I'll say it again: I do not think parents in this country are sitting around the kitchen table saying to themselves that their lives would be better if their children could only make a higher minimum wage," Christie told reporters during a campaign stop with Republican congressional candidate Tom MacArthur at Mastoris Diner in Bordentown.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
State Rep. Brendan Boyle has made the growing gap between the rich and the rest a fitting centerpiece of his campaign to represent the 13th Congressional District, a mostly middle-class area with pockets of poverty spanning parts of Northeast Philadelphia and Montgomery County. The 37-year-old Philadelphia Democrat advocates raising the minimum wage to help the working poor and increasing taxation of passive income such as stocks and bonds, noting that wage earners pay higher effective rates than investors.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY DARRELL L. CLARKE
  AS RECENTLY cited in the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, Philadelphia is still the "poorest of America's 10 largest cities. " While the report showed that 9,000 residents moved out of poverty last year, and that is encouraging, it's hard to take any comfort when so many of our fellow citizens remain in poverty, many of them children and elderly. Over the last 20 years we have witnessed growth in the gap between the haves and have nots and the squeezing of the middle class.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lunchtime rally at the Delaware County Courthouse on Monday was billed as a fight for increasing the minimum wage, but it took on the character of a Democratic campaign rally, with not a single low-wage earner in sight. State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery), who has proposed increasing the hourly minimum from the current $7.25 to $12, said the only way to raise the minimum wage is to elect Democrats. "We have 36 days to make this happen," Leach said. Reached before the rally, Andrew Reilly, Delaware County Republican Party chairman, said an increase "would likely hurt the very people proponents are trying to help" as it would end up impacting businesses.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
THE U.S. CENSUS released figures this week that show that the national poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006. Don't rush to plan a victory parade, though. The percentage of people in poverty has dropped slightly, but the implications are more mathematical than practical: Median household income has remained the same, and the number of those in poverty in 2013 - 45.3 million - is about the same as the year before. And worse news: The percentage of people living below the poverty level in the Philadelphia metro area rose slightly from 2010 to 2013, from 12.7 percent to 13.5 percent; poverty rates in the city fell slightly.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
ONE OF the points that the Democratic candidate for governor makes is that he supports raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. On his website he cites the Economic Policy Institute and endorses their proposal to raise the minimum wage to the aforementioned $10.10. But when you go to their website you find that their plan calls for a $0.95 wage increase over three years which eventually gets to $10.10 in 2016. I don't believe that Wolf has made that differentiation clear. So if you're thinking that if you vote for Mr. Wolf in November that you're going to be getting paid $10.10 as soon as he assumes office, then you're mistaken.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
EAST BRUNSWICK, N.J. - They bashed President Obama, praised each other's leadership, and shared a hug on stage. Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and Gov. Christie, who campaigned for Romney in the run-up to the 2012 election, were together again Wednesday - this time at a fund-raiser for the New Jersey Republican Party that doubled as a 52d birthday celebration for Christie. And this time Christie, the chairman of the Republican Governors Association, is the one publicly mulling a bid for the Republican nomination in 2016 - though he assured attendees Wednesday night that he was focused on his "main job" as governor.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN THE SPIRIT of a 1970s Burger King commercial, low-paid fast-food workers in Philadelphia - and around the nation - say they're more determined than ever to have it their way. Tomorrow, employees not just from Burger King but also from McDonald's, KFC, Popeyes and other iconic fast-food chains seeking a $15-an-hour wage and the right to unionize hope to stage their largest one-day job action ever - punctuated by sit-ins and other acts of civil...
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