CollectionsMinimum Wage
IN THE NEWS

Minimum Wage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By VINCENT HUGHES
THE FEDERAL government has decided that a minimum-wage increase is not a priority. With the recent defeat by Congress of two proposals to raise the minimum wage, it is imperative that Pennsylvania find a way to raise its minimum wage on a state or local level. This is exactly what Philadelphia Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. has done. The recent passage by City Council's Committee on Commerce and Economic Development of a proposal introduced by Councilman Goode requiring city-supported employers to pay at least 150 percent of the state minimum wage to its employees, is commendable.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
About 500 people from various labor and unemployment coalitions rallied on the west steps of the Capitol yesterday to appeal to Congress to boost the $3.35-an-hour federal minimum wage. "We elect these people and they come up here and pay no attention to our needs," said Jim Carson, director of the People's Coalition in St. Louis. "They slip their pay raises through with no problems. " Labor subcommittees in both houses are considering legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage to $4.65 an hour over about three years.
NEWS
April 22, 2005 | By Craig Garthwaite
Craig Garthwaite is director of research at the Employment Policies Institute As Gov. Rendell and state legislators consider a proposal for a $7 an hour minimum wage, they should also bear in mind Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan's warning that such a move "prevents people who are at the early stages of their careers . . . from getting a foothold in the ladder of promotions. " Wage-hike proponents often argue that minimum-wage employees haven't had a raise since Congress last increased the national rate.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
RE YOUR EDITORIAL on the minimum wage and the debate on whether it should be raised: I hear all the time about how raising the minimum wage will hurt the people it is intended to help. Why is it that when union members get a raise, when state legislators give themselves a pay raise in the middle of the night, federal officials vote themselves a raise, CEOs (think Exxon-Mobil) and all other workers get a raise, the economy and minimum-wage workers are not adversely affected? But when people living in poverty are given pay raises, the economy and these workers suffer?
BUSINESS
April 10, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ask any worker earning the minimum wage if he or she would like a pay raise, and odds are good the answer will be yes. After all, at $3.35 an hour - $134 a week, $6,968 a year - the federal minimum wage isn't much. And because it hasn't been raised since January 1981, inflation has eroded its buying power by 30 percent. Ask the same worker if he or she would like to be fired or have work hours cut back, however, and the answer probably will be no. But the worker can't have the raise without risking the loss.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By CHRISTINE M. TARTAGLIONE
WHEN THE clock expired at the end of the Super Bowl, a lot of so-called experts turned out to be wrong. The game is played on the field, and that often has a funny way of defying ill-placed prediction. Overshadowed perhaps by football, but even more important to millions of Pennsylvanians, was the January debunking of forecasts by experts even more certain than football commentators. Two years ago, during an intense debate over Pennsylvania's eroding minimum wage, the big-business lobby and some misled lawmakers were touting the work of a Florida economist who had supposedly studied Pennsylvania's labor market and come to the conclusion that adjusting the minimum wage for inflation would be disastrous for low-wage workers.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
STATE SEN. Tina Tartaglione is to be commended for her commitment to helping low-wage workers. But her plan to have government dictate to business that each year it must pay workers more, regardless of a business' ability to do so, would actually further limit hiring opportunities for these workers. Unfortunately, supporters of a minimum wage cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) fail to realize this because they refuse to acknowledge that the recent minimum-wage hike had any negative impact.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officers of the Oxford Circle Civic Association urged members to attend a rally at state Sen. Hank Salvatore's office next Thursday to show support for a bill raising the minimum wage and to protest the senator's vote on the measure. Joan Somers, the association's director of community affairs, said Tuesday night that the state Senate recently voted 25-24 against raising Pennsylvania's minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.65 an hour over the next three years. She said that Salvatore voted against the measure, which already had passed in the House.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
The big progressive issue of campaign 2000 was previewed in Washington state Nov. 3, but no one in the rest of the country noticed. By a 68 percent majority, voters approved an initiative that hikes the minimum wage to $6.50 an hour by 2000, and then - for the first time ever - indexes it to rise each year with the cost of living. If ever there was an idea whose time has come, this is it. Inflation has eroded the minimum wage to the point where even 1996's two-step federal "increase" to $5.15 has left that wage with less purchasing power than it had in the late 1970s.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By John Dodds, $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
JUNE 30, 2006. That was the last time the Pennsylvania Legislature voted on minimum wage legislation. Since then, 29 states and the District of Columbia have raised their minimum wages, including all of the states that surround our state. California, New York and New Jersey have voted a $15 minimum wage, but in Pennsylvania, we still are at the national bottom, $7.25 per hour. Hundreds of thousands of working people toil in low-wage jobs that we need done in this state. Workers in nursing homes, day-care centers, restaurants, housekeeping, food service, hotels, home health care, etc., are greatly affected by a rock-bottom minimum wage.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers on Thursday passed legislation that would nearly double the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour over the next five years, despite Gov. Christie's veto threat. Effective Jan. 1, 2017, the bill would raise the wage from the current $8.38 an hour to $10.10. The legislation would phase in greater increases through 2021, when the wage would reach $15 an hour. The wage would be tied to inflation to adjust for the cost of living. The legislation passed the state Senate by a vote of 21-18 on Thursday.
NEWS
June 3, 2016
Norcross knows jobs U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (D., N.J.) has the right plan for our economy: more jobs and better wages. He knows how to create jobs because he's been doing it his whole career. Construction, manufacturing, health care, technology - he's had a hand in bringing it to South Jersey. And he knows that good jobs need good pay, since he's been an electrician. That's why he's been vocal about the need to raise the minimum wage, get equal pay for women, and raise incomes for seniors who worked all their lives for a good retirement.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Two years ago, fast-food worker Shymara Jones was a single mother, living with her mother, siblings, and son in a three-bedroom rowhouse on a worn-down block in the non-gentrified part of Grays Ferry, hard by warehouses and refineries. None of that has changed, but everything is different. Same small house, same small street, same Popeyes at Broad and Catharine Streets where Jones, 22, has worked since 2009. But in that time, Jones visited the Eiffel Tower. She met fast-food workers in Brussels, picketed corporate meetings in Chicago - twice - shook hands with politicians, led marches down Broad Street, and plans to rally outside the McDonald's annual meeting this week.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia companies that did not pay temporary workers the minimum wage agreed to pay $763,000 in back wages and damages to be distributed among 797 workers. Temporary workers who packaged jewelry at Stanley Creations Inc. in Melrose Park were paid $6 an hour in cash and were not paid overtime when they worked more than 40 hours, the U.S. Labor Department said Monday. Minimum wage in Pennsylvania is $7.25 an hour. Asendia USA in Folcroft, part of a multinational Swiss and French direct mail and distribution company, paid overtime, but based the overtime on a base pay rate of $6.69 per hour, below minimum wage.
NEWS
April 21, 2016
By Dan White Pennsylvania, like most of the United States, has a problem. Paychecks have not come back from the Great Recession as strongly as they have following other downturns. American workers' wages and salaries took longer to regain their previous, inflation-adjusted peaks after the Great Recession than after any other recession since World War II. This is especially true in the commonwealth, where wages and salaries grew less than three-quarters of the national rate last year.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
It couldn't have been a nicer day for a protest Thursday, as activists - fast-food and home health workers seeking a raise, the Sierra Club, Temple students opposing a stadium, and community people against stop-and-frisk, - marched down Broad Street, banging drums, carrying banners, and shouting slogans. "This is what democracy looks like," hundreds yelled as they walked toward the day's largest rally, at Broad and Arch Streets. Police closed Broad Street. Among those leading the parade was Shymara Jones, 23, of Philadelphia, a Popeyes employee who has been pushing for a $15-an-hour wage for fast-food workers since the national movement kicked off in Philadelphia two years ago. She earns $8.25 an hour, up from $7.25, Pennsylvania's minimum wage, mirroring the national rate.
NEWS
April 6, 2016
ISSUE | MINIMUM WAGE A boost for Pa. The Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry sheds crocodile tears for low-wage workers every time the minimum wage comes up ("Raises will cost jobs," Thursday). Studies have found that there is no negative impact on jobs following modest increases in the minimum wage; the Congressional Budget Office estimates a range of "a very slight reduction" to one million jobs lost nationally with a minimum-wage increase to $10.10 an hour. However, such an increase would mean: More than 1.2 million workers in Pennsylvania would receive raises; $1.9 billion in new wages would go into the state economy; $225 million in new revenues would be generated for the state budget, which is in great need of funds to support our schools and close massive deficits.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Even as the job market tightens and unemployment declines, the recent recession has yet another blow to deliver to the labor economy - one that may not be felt for several years. "We may not be able to provide a good number of jobs for highly skilled people," said economist Efua Afful at Moody's Analytics in West Chester. That is because research-and-development investment, which leads to innovation and employment for highly skilled workers, plummeted during the recession and has yet to rebound, she said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|