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Minimum Wage

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NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By VINCENT HUGHES
THE FEDERAL government has decided that a minimum-wage increase is not a priority. With the recent defeat by Congress of two proposals to raise the minimum wage, it is imperative that Pennsylvania find a way to raise its minimum wage on a state or local level. This is exactly what Philadelphia Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. has done. The recent passage by City Council's Committee on Commerce and Economic Development of a proposal introduced by Councilman Goode requiring city-supported employers to pay at least 150 percent of the state minimum wage to its employees, is commendable.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
About 500 people from various labor and unemployment coalitions rallied on the west steps of the Capitol yesterday to appeal to Congress to boost the $3.35-an-hour federal minimum wage. "We elect these people and they come up here and pay no attention to our needs," said Jim Carson, director of the People's Coalition in St. Louis. "They slip their pay raises through with no problems. " Labor subcommittees in both houses are considering legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage to $4.65 an hour over about three years.
NEWS
April 22, 2005 | By Craig Garthwaite
Craig Garthwaite is director of research at the Employment Policies Institute As Gov. Rendell and state legislators consider a proposal for a $7 an hour minimum wage, they should also bear in mind Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan's warning that such a move "prevents people who are at the early stages of their careers . . . from getting a foothold in the ladder of promotions. " Wage-hike proponents often argue that minimum-wage employees haven't had a raise since Congress last increased the national rate.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
RE YOUR EDITORIAL on the minimum wage and the debate on whether it should be raised: I hear all the time about how raising the minimum wage will hurt the people it is intended to help. Why is it that when union members get a raise, when state legislators give themselves a pay raise in the middle of the night, federal officials vote themselves a raise, CEOs (think Exxon-Mobil) and all other workers get a raise, the economy and minimum-wage workers are not adversely affected? But when people living in poverty are given pay raises, the economy and these workers suffer?
BUSINESS
April 10, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ask any worker earning the minimum wage if he or she would like a pay raise, and odds are good the answer will be yes. After all, at $3.35 an hour - $134 a week, $6,968 a year - the federal minimum wage isn't much. And because it hasn't been raised since January 1981, inflation has eroded its buying power by 30 percent. Ask the same worker if he or she would like to be fired or have work hours cut back, however, and the answer probably will be no. But the worker can't have the raise without risking the loss.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By CHRISTINE M. TARTAGLIONE
WHEN THE clock expired at the end of the Super Bowl, a lot of so-called experts turned out to be wrong. The game is played on the field, and that often has a funny way of defying ill-placed prediction. Overshadowed perhaps by football, but even more important to millions of Pennsylvanians, was the January debunking of forecasts by experts even more certain than football commentators. Two years ago, during an intense debate over Pennsylvania's eroding minimum wage, the big-business lobby and some misled lawmakers were touting the work of a Florida economist who had supposedly studied Pennsylvania's labor market and come to the conclusion that adjusting the minimum wage for inflation would be disastrous for low-wage workers.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
STATE SEN. Tina Tartaglione is to be commended for her commitment to helping low-wage workers. But her plan to have government dictate to business that each year it must pay workers more, regardless of a business' ability to do so, would actually further limit hiring opportunities for these workers. Unfortunately, supporters of a minimum wage cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) fail to realize this because they refuse to acknowledge that the recent minimum-wage hike had any negative impact.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officers of the Oxford Circle Civic Association urged members to attend a rally at state Sen. Hank Salvatore's office next Thursday to show support for a bill raising the minimum wage and to protest the senator's vote on the measure. Joan Somers, the association's director of community affairs, said Tuesday night that the state Senate recently voted 25-24 against raising Pennsylvania's minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.65 an hour over the next three years. She said that Salvatore voted against the measure, which already had passed in the House.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
The big progressive issue of campaign 2000 was previewed in Washington state Nov. 3, but no one in the rest of the country noticed. By a 68 percent majority, voters approved an initiative that hikes the minimum wage to $6.50 an hour by 2000, and then - for the first time ever - indexes it to rise each year with the cost of living. If ever there was an idea whose time has come, this is it. Inflation has eroded the minimum wage to the point where even 1996's two-step federal "increase" to $5.15 has left that wage with less purchasing power than it had in the late 1970s.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
In the Region Gaming take hits Pa. high Gambling revenue in Pennsylvania rebounded last year to $3.17 billion, topping the 2012 record of $3.16 billion, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board said Friday. The upbeat report followed the opening last month of SugarHouse Casino's expanded gaming floor and as the partnership between Cordish Cos. and Greenwood Gaming & Entertainment Inc. are gearing up to start construction on Philadelphia's second casino, Live! Philadelphia, in the stadium district of South Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
Wawa Inc., of Media, will raise the minimum hourly wage it pays store workers to $10. The move comes amidst a tightening labor market, where there is now competition for workers at all levels, including low-wage workers, economist Joel Naroff told members of the MidAtlantic Employers' Association Friday. Also raising its minimum wage is Sheetz Inc., the Altoona-based convenience store chain. The company, with $6.9 billion in revenue and 17,000 employees, said Wednesday it would spend $5 million to increase wages.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
A fee on shopping bags. Security cameras outside every bar. A ban on cigarette sales at city pharmacies. All were proposed by Philadelphia City Council members last year, but none saw a Council vote. Two were shelved without a hearing. Dozens of bills face the same fate each year. And every four years, at the end of a term, all that leftover legislation is gathered, stamped lapsed, and buried. But this graveyard of bills, which this week will get an influx of new markers, may not be a final resting place for every proposal.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As travelers pass through airports on their way to visit their families this Thanksgiving, they should take note of the people pushing grandma's wheelchair, loading dad's golf clubs, or quietly mopping the terminal. These are some of the people who have been bypassed by a recovering economy. They suffer disproportionately from stagnant wages that have about 5 percent less buying power than they did five years ago. They are struggling to feed and shelter their families on wages that put them at or near the poverty line.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Rain spits down, clouds obscure William Penn atop City Hall, and on this damp fall day no one is sure where Katie McGinty is supposed to go. Labor unions, liberal activists, and fast-food workers plan to rally to boost the minimum wage to $15, and McGinty, running for the U.S. Senate, is eager to add her voice to the cause. But the event is off to a choppy start. It's running late. When a crowd of purple-clad SEIU workers finally arrives, McGinty greets them with a smile locked in place, teeth showing.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holding a microphone, Shymara Jones, a fast-food worker at Popeyes, had a message for the politicians. "We have to make sure our state representatives are talking about $15 an hour," Jones, 22, of Philadelphia, said at a rainy rally outside City Hall. "This is what they need to be talking about 24/7 if they want our vote. " Dubbing it a fast-food "strike," more than 100 restaurant workers in Philadelphia and many more around the nation on Tuesday held rallies, protests, and marches, seeking a $15-an-hour minimum wage, a union, and political power.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Tens of thousands of times a week, according to one study, employers steal money from low-wage workers in Philadelphia. They fail to compensate them for overtime, pay them less than the minimum wage, undercount their hours, withhold their tips, or don't pay them at all. A Temple University study estimated that there are about 90,000 incidents of wage theft in the city every week, costing victims $51 to $87. That's less money for rent, food, and...
NEWS
October 13, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
Correction: Quotes attributed to Kati Sipp in the original version were actually from Kate Goodman, an organizer for 15Now. Safiyyah Cotton earns a lousy $7.50 an hour working at a McDonald's in North Philadelphia. Chump change. Yeah, I know it's McDonald's. But it's not as if Cotton is some teenager still living at home with parents who pay for everything. She's a 22-year-old single mother taking care of both herself and her young son. And get this: She usually only works about 20 hours a week.
NEWS
October 12, 2015
ISSUE | MINIMUM WAGE We need $15 an hour As a fast-food worker, I wake up each day with thoughts I'm sure many other underpaid workers share: "Can I pay the electricity bill this month?" and "Will there be enough food?" Because of this low-wage crisis, hundreds of Philadelphia workers like me told their stories about what it's like to survive on less than $15 an hour at a session of the "people's wage board" last week. The wage board was organized by the Fight For $15 Philadelphia and Pittsburgh fast-food workers, along with community partners and allies.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CITY Councilman Bill Greenlee yesterday introduced legislation that would create a new city position of wage-theft coordinator to review and adjudicate employee complaints and to fine employers found to have broken the law. During the average week in Philadelphia, 36,400 low-wage workers are not paid minimum wage, 29,500 are not paid for all the overtime they are due and 28,200 aren't paid for off-the-clock work, according to a report from the...
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