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Minimum Wage

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NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By VINCENT HUGHES
THE FEDERAL government has decided that a minimum-wage increase is not a priority. With the recent defeat by Congress of two proposals to raise the minimum wage, it is imperative that Pennsylvania find a way to raise its minimum wage on a state or local level. This is exactly what Philadelphia Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. has done. The recent passage by City Council's Committee on Commerce and Economic Development of a proposal introduced by Councilman Goode requiring city-supported employers to pay at least 150 percent of the state minimum wage to its employees, is commendable.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
About 500 people from various labor and unemployment coalitions rallied on the west steps of the Capitol yesterday to appeal to Congress to boost the $3.35-an-hour federal minimum wage. "We elect these people and they come up here and pay no attention to our needs," said Jim Carson, director of the People's Coalition in St. Louis. "They slip their pay raises through with no problems. " Labor subcommittees in both houses are considering legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage to $4.65 an hour over about three years.
NEWS
April 22, 2005 | By Craig Garthwaite
Craig Garthwaite is director of research at the Employment Policies Institute As Gov. Rendell and state legislators consider a proposal for a $7 an hour minimum wage, they should also bear in mind Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan's warning that such a move "prevents people who are at the early stages of their careers . . . from getting a foothold in the ladder of promotions. " Wage-hike proponents often argue that minimum-wage employees haven't had a raise since Congress last increased the national rate.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
RE YOUR EDITORIAL on the minimum wage and the debate on whether it should be raised: I hear all the time about how raising the minimum wage will hurt the people it is intended to help. Why is it that when union members get a raise, when state legislators give themselves a pay raise in the middle of the night, federal officials vote themselves a raise, CEOs (think Exxon-Mobil) and all other workers get a raise, the economy and minimum-wage workers are not adversely affected? But when people living in poverty are given pay raises, the economy and these workers suffer?
BUSINESS
April 10, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ask any worker earning the minimum wage if he or she would like a pay raise, and odds are good the answer will be yes. After all, at $3.35 an hour - $134 a week, $6,968 a year - the federal minimum wage isn't much. And because it hasn't been raised since January 1981, inflation has eroded its buying power by 30 percent. Ask the same worker if he or she would like to be fired or have work hours cut back, however, and the answer probably will be no. But the worker can't have the raise without risking the loss.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By CHRISTINE M. TARTAGLIONE
WHEN THE clock expired at the end of the Super Bowl, a lot of so-called experts turned out to be wrong. The game is played on the field, and that often has a funny way of defying ill-placed prediction. Overshadowed perhaps by football, but even more important to millions of Pennsylvanians, was the January debunking of forecasts by experts even more certain than football commentators. Two years ago, during an intense debate over Pennsylvania's eroding minimum wage, the big-business lobby and some misled lawmakers were touting the work of a Florida economist who had supposedly studied Pennsylvania's labor market and come to the conclusion that adjusting the minimum wage for inflation would be disastrous for low-wage workers.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
STATE SEN. Tina Tartaglione is to be commended for her commitment to helping low-wage workers. But her plan to have government dictate to business that each year it must pay workers more, regardless of a business' ability to do so, would actually further limit hiring opportunities for these workers. Unfortunately, supporters of a minimum wage cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) fail to realize this because they refuse to acknowledge that the recent minimum-wage hike had any negative impact.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officers of the Oxford Circle Civic Association urged members to attend a rally at state Sen. Hank Salvatore's office next Thursday to show support for a bill raising the minimum wage and to protest the senator's vote on the measure. Joan Somers, the association's director of community affairs, said Tuesday night that the state Senate recently voted 25-24 against raising Pennsylvania's minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.65 an hour over the next three years. She said that Salvatore voted against the measure, which already had passed in the House.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
The big progressive issue of campaign 2000 was previewed in Washington state Nov. 3, but no one in the rest of the country noticed. By a 68 percent majority, voters approved an initiative that hikes the minimum wage to $6.50 an hour by 2000, and then - for the first time ever - indexes it to rise each year with the cost of living. If ever there was an idea whose time has come, this is it. Inflation has eroded the minimum wage to the point where even 1996's two-step federal "increase" to $5.15 has left that wage with less purchasing power than it had in the late 1970s.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's servers, bellhops, and bartenders earn lower hourly wages than their counterparts in Pennsylvania and Delaware, pushing them into poverty, according to a report released Wednesday. "Instead of dealing with the needs of people who work for tipped wages, we've largely ignored them," said Gordon MacInnes, president of New Jersey Policy Perspective, the organization that released the report. Under New Jersey law, the state's 140,000 "tipped" workers must be paid a minimum of $2.13 an hour, which is also the federal minimum wage for tipped workers and hasn't changed since 1991.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joining a movement toward increasing income for low-wage workers, Ikea USA announced Thursday that more than half its minimum-wage hourly workers would get an average 17 percent raise, effective Jan. 1. The announcement by the Swedish retailer, which has its U.S. headquarters in Conshohocken, came days after Gap Inc. instituted a wage increase for its 65,000 workers and a week after City Council passed an ordinance raising minimum wages for employees...
BUSINESS
June 9, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Friday's jobless figure - 6.3 percent - for May (same as April) means the economy is improving, but slowly, the experts say. Is this what an economic recovery is supposed to feel like? This month marks five years since the end of the Great Recession. Starting with a chart about the job numbers, CNN Money presents 17 visuals to illustrate the recovery. Unemployment has fallen from 10 percent in late 2009, gross domestic product has wobbled, stocks have soared, mortgage foreclosures have plummeted.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warning that jobs - especially those created by small businesses - will be at risk, the PA Chamber of Business and Industry and 34 local chambers of commerce sent a letter Tuesday to the General Assembly urging legislators to oppose proposed mandated wage hikes. "Following a historically devastating economic recession and in the midst of an unprecedentedly [sic] sluggish recovery and persistently high unemployment, it is imperative that lawmakers pursue public policy that encourages job retention and creation and avoids impediments to economic growth," the letter says.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
GOVERNOR Rob McCord (D.) CITY COUNCIL AT-LARGE (Special Election) Matt Wolfe (R.) CITY BALLOT QUESTIONS Question 1: Allow Council to set minimum wage for city subcontractors? Vote NO Question 2: Allow city elected officials to remain in office while campaigning for another office? Vote NO Question 3: Give Council authority to approve contracts for legal representation of indigent defendants? Vote NO STATE SENATE       Fourth District             Second District     Art Haywood (D.)
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
NATE SMITH, 22, a baggage handler at Philadelphia International Airport and father of a 2-year-old girl, says he experiences pretty much all of the downsides of work - the constant aches and back pain from lugging more than 1,000 heavy bags every day. But earning the federal minimum wage of $7.25, the Southwest Philadelphia resident says he is not enjoying the full benefits of his labors. Smith said that he, his fiancee and his daughter are living with his grandmother to make ends meet, and he's frustrated when he can't buy his little girl a toy because he can barely pay the monthly bills.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
TOMORROW'S primary election will determine the candidates for a number of offices, including governor, lieutenant governor, U.S. House and some state House races. If that's not reason enough to vote, consider this: Just last week, Gov. Corbett announced that he will drop further appeals to a court ruling banning the state's voter-ID law, put into place two years ago. The death of this pernicious law is reason to celebrate, and the best way to do that is to get out and vote. Here are our endorsements for governor and for city ballot questions.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia fast-food workers and activists joined protests Thursday in what was billed as a global fast-food strike, with workers in 150 cities and 30 countries reportedly participating. It was Philadelphia's first official participation in a fast-food strike, although there have been strikes in Wilmington and rallies in the city on the issue of raising wages for fast-food workers to $15 an hour. Industry associations say raising wages would force restaurant owners to cut positions or hours.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
THERE ARE many compelling arguments for and against raising the minimum wage. Those against say that it's a job-killer and will raise prices. Those for raising the wage say that a higher wage would lift many people over the poverty line, and that studies show no effective negative impact on job creation. Besides, the wage has long been stagnant; the minimum wage in 1968 would be $9.04 in today's dollars. For us, the most compelling argument for the impact of low wages is summed up in five words: Walmart workers on food stamps.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter signed an executive order Tuesday requiring city contractors and the companies they subcontract with to pay a minimum wage of $10.88 per hour for city work for the rest of the year. Starting in January, the order said, that minimum will rise to $12 an hour and will be adjusted for inflation going forward. Nutter cited the State of the Union message in which President Obama urged mayors and governors not to wait for Congress to act on the minimum wage. "Today, I will in fact answer the president's call," Nutter said.
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