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Minimum Wage

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NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By VINCENT HUGHES
THE FEDERAL government has decided that a minimum-wage increase is not a priority. With the recent defeat by Congress of two proposals to raise the minimum wage, it is imperative that Pennsylvania find a way to raise its minimum wage on a state or local level. This is exactly what Philadelphia Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. has done. The recent passage by City Council's Committee on Commerce and Economic Development of a proposal introduced by Councilman Goode requiring city-supported employers to pay at least 150 percent of the state minimum wage to its employees, is commendable.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
About 500 people from various labor and unemployment coalitions rallied on the west steps of the Capitol yesterday to appeal to Congress to boost the $3.35-an-hour federal minimum wage. "We elect these people and they come up here and pay no attention to our needs," said Jim Carson, director of the People's Coalition in St. Louis. "They slip their pay raises through with no problems. " Labor subcommittees in both houses are considering legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage to $4.65 an hour over about three years.
NEWS
April 22, 2005 | By Craig Garthwaite
Craig Garthwaite is director of research at the Employment Policies Institute As Gov. Rendell and state legislators consider a proposal for a $7 an hour minimum wage, they should also bear in mind Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan's warning that such a move "prevents people who are at the early stages of their careers . . . from getting a foothold in the ladder of promotions. " Wage-hike proponents often argue that minimum-wage employees haven't had a raise since Congress last increased the national rate.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
RE YOUR EDITORIAL on the minimum wage and the debate on whether it should be raised: I hear all the time about how raising the minimum wage will hurt the people it is intended to help. Why is it that when union members get a raise, when state legislators give themselves a pay raise in the middle of the night, federal officials vote themselves a raise, CEOs (think Exxon-Mobil) and all other workers get a raise, the economy and minimum-wage workers are not adversely affected? But when people living in poverty are given pay raises, the economy and these workers suffer?
BUSINESS
April 10, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ask any worker earning the minimum wage if he or she would like a pay raise, and odds are good the answer will be yes. After all, at $3.35 an hour - $134 a week, $6,968 a year - the federal minimum wage isn't much. And because it hasn't been raised since January 1981, inflation has eroded its buying power by 30 percent. Ask the same worker if he or she would like to be fired or have work hours cut back, however, and the answer probably will be no. But the worker can't have the raise without risking the loss.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By CHRISTINE M. TARTAGLIONE
WHEN THE clock expired at the end of the Super Bowl, a lot of so-called experts turned out to be wrong. The game is played on the field, and that often has a funny way of defying ill-placed prediction. Overshadowed perhaps by football, but even more important to millions of Pennsylvanians, was the January debunking of forecasts by experts even more certain than football commentators. Two years ago, during an intense debate over Pennsylvania's eroding minimum wage, the big-business lobby and some misled lawmakers were touting the work of a Florida economist who had supposedly studied Pennsylvania's labor market and come to the conclusion that adjusting the minimum wage for inflation would be disastrous for low-wage workers.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
STATE SEN. Tina Tartaglione is to be commended for her commitment to helping low-wage workers. But her plan to have government dictate to business that each year it must pay workers more, regardless of a business' ability to do so, would actually further limit hiring opportunities for these workers. Unfortunately, supporters of a minimum wage cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) fail to realize this because they refuse to acknowledge that the recent minimum-wage hike had any negative impact.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officers of the Oxford Circle Civic Association urged members to attend a rally at state Sen. Hank Salvatore's office next Thursday to show support for a bill raising the minimum wage and to protest the senator's vote on the measure. Joan Somers, the association's director of community affairs, said Tuesday night that the state Senate recently voted 25-24 against raising Pennsylvania's minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.65 an hour over the next three years. She said that Salvatore voted against the measure, which already had passed in the House.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
The big progressive issue of campaign 2000 was previewed in Washington state Nov. 3, but no one in the rest of the country noticed. By a 68 percent majority, voters approved an initiative that hikes the minimum wage to $6.50 an hour by 2000, and then - for the first time ever - indexes it to rise each year with the cost of living. If ever there was an idea whose time has come, this is it. Inflation has eroded the minimum wage to the point where even 1996's two-step federal "increase" to $5.15 has left that wage with less purchasing power than it had in the late 1970s.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Labor Day inaugurates the political season for unions that muster their organizational power to campaign for pro-labor candidates. For Laurel Brennan, the highest-ranking female labor leader in New Jersey, this year's effort is especially meaningful. "I feel a deep sense of pride and satisfaction," said Brennan, 64, secretary- treasurer of the New Jersey State AFL-CIO, talking about the possibility that the nation will elect its first female president. "A woman in the White House will be a positive role model and inspire women to realize their own value," Brennan said.
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
PENNINGTON, N.J. - Gov. Christie on Tuesday vetoed legislation that would have nearly doubled New Jersey's minimum wage to $15 an hour in five years, calling the proposal a "radical increase" that would hurt businesses and consumers. Speaking in the produce aisle of a family-owned grocery store in Mercer County, Christie accused the Democratic-controlled Legislature of pandering "to folks who are uninformed because they neither receive the minimum wage nor pay it. " "This type of heavy hand of government, saying that we know better than the people who actually run these businesses, is the reason why in past administrations New Jersey has gotten less and less affordable," Christie said, standing in front of a stand of 69-cent bananas and various organic foods.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
ISSUE | MINIMUM WAGE $15 an hour could cost jobs A commentary supported its call for a $15 federal minimum wage by pointing out that nearly half of the American workforce makes less than this ("Agenda for working families," Monday). But that is hardly a justification for such a wage hike; in fact, it's an illustration of how extreme the proposal is. When employers can't offset such cost increases through higher prices, fewer jobs and more automation are the predictable results.
NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Minor Sinclair and Joseph M. Schwartz
  Hard work should pay off. But for millions of workers in the United States, it hardly pays the bills. We need candidates willing to champion changes that will benefit everyone in the economy. And now is the time because here it comes with flashing lights and loud cheers: The general election season is here now that the two major parties have held their national conventions in Cleveland and Philadelphia. This is the moment when candidates for the presidency and Congress start to lay out their agendas, giving voters in Pennsylvania and elsewhere around the nation a chance to look at who has the best ideas for the country and states.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | Cynthia Burton, Inquirer editorial writer
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) has an interesting analysis of why President Obama has had trouble moving his agenda. Sanders says an inspired grassroots coalition swept Obama to victory. But after his election, the president devoted himself to the work of being a president without tending enough to the grassroots activists who had helped elect him. "Obama got elected and said: 'Hey, thank you so much for your help. I'll take it from here.' And I think that was a tactical mistake," Sanders noted when he spoke to the editorial boards of the Inquirer and Daily News in April.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER lmccrystal@phillynews.com 610-313-8116 @Lmccrystal
Decades ago, Peggy McCausland worked as a secretary in an office that felt a lot like the TV show Mad Men. "It was just rampant sexual harassment," she said. "So you just tolerated it because you had no choice. " Workplace culture has changed, said McCausland, now a lawyer and member of the Forum of Executive Women , a group of Philadelphia-area business leaders. But in many offices, she said, women still face sexual harassment and earn less than male colleagues.
NEWS
July 26, 2016
Few conditions are more divisive and frustrating than income inequality. Even as rising profits and productivity have produced higher incomes for more affluent Americans, many middle- and lower-income families are struggling. That disparity resonated with voters in the primaries and caucuses leading up to this week's Democratic National Convention. Executive pay is 276 times the average worker's pay. Meanwhile, average wages have steadily lost buying power since 1979 because they have not kept pace with the cost of living.
NEWS
July 19, 2016
ISSUE | MINIMUM WAGE Overdue for a raise After more than 10 years, it's time for Pennsylvania to raise the minimum wage. The legislature voted on June 30, 2006, to raise the minimum wage to $6.25 an hour beginning Jan. 1, 2007, and to $7.15 effective July 1, 2007. The wage increased to $7.25 in 2009 to match the federal rate. Meanwhile, the cost of living has continued to go up, while many working people are stuck making poverty wages. According to the Keystone Research Center, if we raised the minimum wage to $10.10, nearly 1.3 million people (23 percent of the state's resident workforce)
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By John Dodds, $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
JUNE 30, 2006. That was the last time the Pennsylvania Legislature voted on minimum wage legislation. Since then, 29 states and the District of Columbia have raised their minimum wages, including all of the states that surround our state. California, New York and New Jersey have voted a $15 minimum wage, but in Pennsylvania, we still are at the national bottom, $7.25 per hour. Hundreds of thousands of working people toil in low-wage jobs that we need done in this state. Workers in nursing homes, day-care centers, restaurants, housekeeping, food service, hotels, home health care, etc., are greatly affected by a rock-bottom minimum wage.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers on Thursday passed legislation that would nearly double the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour over the next five years, despite Gov. Christie's veto threat. Effective Jan. 1, 2017, the bill would raise the wage from the current $8.38 an hour to $10.10. The legislation would phase in greater increases through 2021, when the wage would reach $15 an hour. The wage would be tied to inflation to adjust for the cost of living. The legislation passed the state Senate by a vote of 21-18 on Thursday.
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