CollectionsMinimum Wage
IN THE NEWS

Minimum Wage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By VINCENT HUGHES
THE FEDERAL government has decided that a minimum-wage increase is not a priority. With the recent defeat by Congress of two proposals to raise the minimum wage, it is imperative that Pennsylvania find a way to raise its minimum wage on a state or local level. This is exactly what Philadelphia Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. has done. The recent passage by City Council's Committee on Commerce and Economic Development of a proposal introduced by Councilman Goode requiring city-supported employers to pay at least 150 percent of the state minimum wage to its employees, is commendable.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
About 500 people from various labor and unemployment coalitions rallied on the west steps of the Capitol yesterday to appeal to Congress to boost the $3.35-an-hour federal minimum wage. "We elect these people and they come up here and pay no attention to our needs," said Jim Carson, director of the People's Coalition in St. Louis. "They slip their pay raises through with no problems. " Labor subcommittees in both houses are considering legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage to $4.65 an hour over about three years.
NEWS
April 22, 2005 | By Craig Garthwaite
Craig Garthwaite is director of research at the Employment Policies Institute As Gov. Rendell and state legislators consider a proposal for a $7 an hour minimum wage, they should also bear in mind Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan's warning that such a move "prevents people who are at the early stages of their careers . . . from getting a foothold in the ladder of promotions. " Wage-hike proponents often argue that minimum-wage employees haven't had a raise since Congress last increased the national rate.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
RE YOUR EDITORIAL on the minimum wage and the debate on whether it should be raised: I hear all the time about how raising the minimum wage will hurt the people it is intended to help. Why is it that when union members get a raise, when state legislators give themselves a pay raise in the middle of the night, federal officials vote themselves a raise, CEOs (think Exxon-Mobil) and all other workers get a raise, the economy and minimum-wage workers are not adversely affected? But when people living in poverty are given pay raises, the economy and these workers suffer?
BUSINESS
April 10, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ask any worker earning the minimum wage if he or she would like a pay raise, and odds are good the answer will be yes. After all, at $3.35 an hour - $134 a week, $6,968 a year - the federal minimum wage isn't much. And because it hasn't been raised since January 1981, inflation has eroded its buying power by 30 percent. Ask the same worker if he or she would like to be fired or have work hours cut back, however, and the answer probably will be no. But the worker can't have the raise without risking the loss.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By CHRISTINE M. TARTAGLIONE
WHEN THE clock expired at the end of the Super Bowl, a lot of so-called experts turned out to be wrong. The game is played on the field, and that often has a funny way of defying ill-placed prediction. Overshadowed perhaps by football, but even more important to millions of Pennsylvanians, was the January debunking of forecasts by experts even more certain than football commentators. Two years ago, during an intense debate over Pennsylvania's eroding minimum wage, the big-business lobby and some misled lawmakers were touting the work of a Florida economist who had supposedly studied Pennsylvania's labor market and come to the conclusion that adjusting the minimum wage for inflation would be disastrous for low-wage workers.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
STATE SEN. Tina Tartaglione is to be commended for her commitment to helping low-wage workers. But her plan to have government dictate to business that each year it must pay workers more, regardless of a business' ability to do so, would actually further limit hiring opportunities for these workers. Unfortunately, supporters of a minimum wage cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) fail to realize this because they refuse to acknowledge that the recent minimum-wage hike had any negative impact.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officers of the Oxford Circle Civic Association urged members to attend a rally at state Sen. Hank Salvatore's office next Thursday to show support for a bill raising the minimum wage and to protest the senator's vote on the measure. Joan Somers, the association's director of community affairs, said Tuesday night that the state Senate recently voted 25-24 against raising Pennsylvania's minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.65 an hour over the next three years. She said that Salvatore voted against the measure, which already had passed in the House.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
The big progressive issue of campaign 2000 was previewed in Washington state Nov. 3, but no one in the rest of the country noticed. By a 68 percent majority, voters approved an initiative that hikes the minimum wage to $6.50 an hour by 2000, and then - for the first time ever - indexes it to rise each year with the cost of living. If ever there was an idea whose time has come, this is it. Inflation has eroded the minimum wage to the point where even 1996's two-step federal "increase" to $5.15 has left that wage with less purchasing power than it had in the late 1970s.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Low-wage workers at Philadelphia International Airport urged Philadelphia voters Friday to approve a question on the May 20 primary ballot that would increase the minimum wage for employees hired by airport subcontractors to $10.88 an hour. The workers, who earn an average of $7.85 an hour, rallied outside the airport's Terminal B carrying signs reading: "Don't leave us behind the Big Apple!" After a heated campaign by airport workers in New York, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey recently asked four airlines - American, Delta, JetBlue, and United - at LaGuardia and Kennedy airports to grant an immediate raise of $1 an hour for workers earning less than $9. The raise will be phased-in to $10.10 an hour.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three weeks ago, President Obama and Connecticut Gov. Dannell P. Malloy ate lunch at Cafe Beauregard in New Britain, Conn. The restaurant became the setting Thursday night for the governor to sign a law lifting the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, from $8.25. That will make the Nutmeg State the first to heed Obama's call to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, up from the current national minimum of $7.25. "Increasing the minimum wage is not just good for workers, it's also good for business," Malloy said in a statement Wednesday.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON An Assembly panel advanced legislation Monday that would increase the minimum wage for New Jersey workers who make most of their money in tips, despite objections from restaurant and beverage industry officials who feared a blow to businesses. The bill would allow employers to claim credits for tips paid to employees, and, in effect, raise hourly wages from $2.13 to $5.93 by late 2015. Supporters note that the wage has not increased in two decades, even as the cost of living has risen.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
LAST WEEK, President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department, based on the nature of the worker's duties and the worker's salary, the presumption being that higher salaries denoted higher-status administrative workers who did not need the same protections as lower-wage production workers (an arguable point)
BUSINESS
March 20, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Advocates for increasing the paychecks of low-wage workers held twin rallies in Pennsylvania on Tuesday. In Harrisburg, politicians, religious, community, and labor leaders gathered at the Capitol Media Center to announce a push to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 from the current $7.25. And in front of a North Philadelphia McDonald's, restaurant workers, activists, and labor officials met to urge the fast-food giant to pay its workers $15 an hour and to not interfere with their joining a union.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
Fashionable science As an advocate for science education, I was excited to see that once again a woman of science - pharmacologist Frances Oldham Kelsey - was among the honorees for this year's National Women's History Month. It is a reminder that women play a vital role in scientific achievement. But women still lag behind in the science, technology, engineering, and math professions. So this year's observance offers another chance for parents to open the door of scientific curiosity a bit wider for their daughters.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Pete's Tax" has proved costly. Chickie's & Pete's, the Philadelphia sports bar and restaurant chain, has agreed to pay $8.52 million in back wages and damages to employees for illegally docking a portion of their tips and failing to properly pay minimum wage, overtime, and other required income. Of that amount, $6.8 million is to be paid to 1,159 past and present employees to resolve an investigation by the U.S. Labor Department. The remaining $1.68 million is to settle federal lawsuits by about 90 current and former employees.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama's call to raise the minimum wage brought cheers Tuesday from local Democrats in Congress, but a mixed reaction from Philadelphia-area Republicans in what was likely a preview of the debate that will play out in heated campaigns this fall. Obama used part of his State of the Union speech to urge Congress to raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour as part of a sweeping mission to level the economic playing field, though the idea seems unlikely to gain traction.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
PRESIDENT OBAMA: action hero, or bad actor? More than five years after becoming America's 44th president, Obama declared in his State of the Union address last night that his sixth, 2014, would be a "year of action. " His proclamation was born partly from resolve to tackle the rising gap between America's rich and poor but mainly from his frustration over getting anything done in gridlocked Washington. The president told Americans in the just-over-an-hour televised address that his political weapon of choice would be the pen - that during the next 12 months he would sign executive orders as a way to address some of the country's many vexing problems.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A week before President Obama is to deliver his State of the Union address, Sen. Robert P. Casey of Pennsylvania is joining a growing chorus of Democratic legislators calling on Congress to raise the federal minimum wage. In a wide-ranging conference call with reporters Tuesday that focused on income inequality, Casey reiterated his support for the Fair Minimum Wage Act, a bill introduced last year that he cosponsored. Supported by Obama and other Democrats, the bill would raise the national minimum wage to $10.10 an hour from its current $7.25.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|