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Minimum Wage

NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Tens of thousands of times a week, according to one study, employers steal money from low-wage workers in Philadelphia. They fail to compensate them for overtime, pay them less than the minimum wage, undercount their hours, withhold their tips, or don't pay them at all. A Temple University study estimated that there are about 90,000 incidents of wage theft in the city every week, costing victims $51 to $87. That's less money for rent, food, and...
NEWS
October 13, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
Correction: Quotes attributed to Kati Sipp in the original version were actually from Kate Goodman, an organizer for 15Now. Safiyyah Cotton earns a lousy $7.50 an hour working at a McDonald's in North Philadelphia. Chump change. Yeah, I know it's McDonald's. But it's not as if Cotton is some teenager still living at home with parents who pay for everything. She's a 22-year-old single mother taking care of both herself and her young son. And get this: She usually only works about 20 hours a week.
NEWS
October 12, 2015
ISSUE | MINIMUM WAGE We need $15 an hour As a fast-food worker, I wake up each day with thoughts I'm sure many other underpaid workers share: "Can I pay the electricity bill this month?" and "Will there be enough food?" Because of this low-wage crisis, hundreds of Philadelphia workers like me told their stories about what it's like to survive on less than $15 an hour at a session of the "people's wage board" last week. The wage board was organized by the Fight For $15 Philadelphia and Pittsburgh fast-food workers, along with community partners and allies.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CITY Councilman Bill Greenlee yesterday introduced legislation that would create a new city position of wage-theft coordinator to review and adjudicate employee complaints and to fine employers found to have broken the law. During the average week in Philadelphia, 36,400 low-wage workers are not paid minimum wage, 29,500 are not paid for all the overtime they are due and 28,200 aren't paid for off-the-clock work, according to a report from the...
NEWS
August 28, 2015
THE FEDERAL COURT of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled that the U.S. Department of Labor does indeed have the authority to extend federal wage and hour laws to the nation's 2 million home-care aides. In Pennsylvania, this decision means that 125,000 home care aides will now be subject to federal labor protections, including guaranteed minimum wage, overtime pay and compensation for travel between clients. Though Pennsylvania already guarantees state minimum wage and time and a half for overtime for its home-care workforce, compensation for travel time is a significant change.
NEWS
August 15, 2015
ISSUE | STATE STORES Save a buck in Pa. Some time ago, I compared the prices of 12 bottles of good wine available in State Stores and then looked in shops in Maryland and New Jersey, and I came to this conclusion: If you want less selection and higher prices, you'll be in favor of privatizing the state's liquor monopoly. As the single largest purchaser of wine in the country, Pennsylvania can and does offer lower prices and a wider selection than some private stores. We'd be foolish to privatize.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IN TODAY'S lead Tattle item, we not only get info about two of America's favorite child stars, but a brief lesson in why trickle-down economics is a joke. According to USA Today , Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen and their fashion empire, Dualstar Entertainment Group, have been targeted in a class-action suit by 40 interns, past and present. Dualstar is the parent company of the twins' fashion labels, Elizabeth and James, and The Row. The suit alleges that Dualstar failed to pay interns for menial tasks, and claims they should have been paid minimum wage because they were doing similar kinds of jobs as their paid colleagues, without receiving any academic or vocational credit.
NEWS
August 6, 2015
ISSUE | WAGES Minimum rate hike not all it seems An increase in entry-level wages by more than 100 percent would ignore the serious unintended consequences for the economy and the employees it's intended to help ("$15-an-hour movement brings hope to city workers," July 29). Numerous nonpartisan organizations have found that mandated increases lead to negative employment impacts, including the Congressional Budget Office, which recently concluded that an increase to the oft-cited level of $10.10 would lead to a loss of approximately 500,000 jobs.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Trumka, a former mine worker and a graduate of Villanova's law school, leads the nation's largest labor federation - the AFL-CIO - so he hears workers gripe about their pay and benefits all the time. But, those workers have pay and benefits. On Monday, Trumka, in the offices of Community Legal Services in Philadelphia, sat quietly as lawyers, workers, and advocates talked about people who work and don't get paid. "Most of us know that wage theft goes on, but the depth and the breadth of what goes on escapes most of us," Trumka said.
NEWS
June 6, 2015
ISSUE | SPECIAL ATHLETES Relay a message Despite advances that have been made over the years, men, women, and children with disabilities face negative stereotypes on a daily basis. This summer, Special Olympics and Bank of America are providing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for people to join the movement for equality. We're bringing the Unified Relay Across America to cities and towns throughout the country, including Philadelphia, where it continues Friday. The relay will give Philadelphians an unprecedented opportunity to show their commitment to inclusion and respect for all by simply getting involved.
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