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February 15, 2013
A story Thursday on taxidermy artist Beth Beverly misspelled the last name of Jen Cohan, who gave her dead dog to Beverly to be preserved. A story Thursday about the Philadelphia Orchestra incorrectly described the status of the Minnesota Orchestra's musicians. They have been locked out. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
How much money is a principal oboist worth? A section violinist? What about the president of a struggling symphony orchestra? Or a third-grade teacher, for that matter? Not long ago, I found myself explaining to my tween son why certain things he covets - a trendy brand of ear phones, in this case - command a high price, and why price tags are often divorced from justice and logic. It has always been true and always will be: Nothing has intrinsic value; something fetches only what someone is willing to pay for it. What someone is willing to pay for orchestral musicians in this country has changed radically in recent weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Five or six decades have passed since Herbert von Karajan's advocacy for Sibelius established an international sound concept on the composer's coattails. Polished and cool, Karajan's recordings of the Sibelius symphonies might have done more to advance the cause of ensemble perfection than of the composer. They were beautiful and superficial. And they were hardly the last word. Osmo Vänskä seemed to be dismantling Karajan's legacy phrase by phrase Sunday afternoon in a remarkable appearance with the orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music in Verizon Hall.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
A stagehand strike has forced the cancellation of Carnegie Hall's Wednesday night black-tie gala season-opener, at which the Philadelphia Orchestra was to have been the featured ensemble. The stagehands, represented by Local One of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, were working under a contract that expired Aug. 31, and called a strike at 8 a.m., according to a union statement. "Carnegie Hall sincerely regrets any inconvenience this strike will cause our artists, concertgoers, and everyone with whom we work," said Clive Gillinson, executive and artistic Director of Carnegie Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2001 | by Tom Di Nardo Daily News Classical Music Writer
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA Access Concert, David Alan Miller conducting. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $15. Info: 215-893-1999.? You've never been to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra? I've heard all the reasons why people haven't. They mostly revolve around fear of not being well-versed in music, the stereotyped assumptions of formality and the probable need to get all dressed up. Those fears disappear when they finally visit the Academy of Music, judging from the many first-timers who send exuberant e-mails hungry for suggestions about upcoming concerts.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Osmo V?nsk? doesn't rehearse the Philadelphia Orchestra as much as he wrestles with sound. The mildly burly 53-year-old conductor is in black jeans and T-shirt, sliding on and off his chair and leaning over the second violins as if performing emergency surgery. He's not a tall man, but he seems to grow by a foot when in front of an orchestra, even though he spends a fair amount of time crouching. Being partially out of sight is his way of drawing a true pianissimo from the Philadelphia Orchestra.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
European orchestras are being imported at record rates, but the policy has not raised a cry for protectionist legislation. These orchestras bring other accents, glimpses of repertoire and approaches to music that give our indigenous orchestras perspective. The Stuttgart Radio Orchestra, which played at the Grand Opera House in Wilmington Monday night, appeared to be an ensemble awaiting a conductor to release its best abilities. Neville Marriner, founder of the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-fields and former music director of the Minnesota Orchestra, is probably not that conductor.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
An additional insight into Eugene Ormandy's legendary 44-year association with the Philadelphia Orchestra has been added to his legacy. A valuable new oral history section, now available at the Ormandy Memorial Archive at University of Pennsylvania's Van Pelt Library, comprises 86 taped interviews about the maestro. It provides a more personal dimension to his memory. Through these tapes, students and music lovers can learn what audiences and musicians felt during his tenure, filling out a period of which most students would not be aware.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There is nothing vaguely felt in Osmo V?nsk?'s Sibelius Symphony No. 2. He feels strongly about it all. When it's fast, it should be very fast. When it's stern or emphatic, the music scolds. Tenderness slows to the point where it threatens to dissolve. Many listeners will like his way with Sibelius' most popular symphony, which had a long history here before the Finnish conductor brought it to the Philadelphia Orchestra. But to anyone whose ear was set by any of the three Ormandy recordings of the work, V?nsk?'s interpretation may sound more like an act of perfidy than revelation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1986 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Conductor Stanislaw Skrowaczewski is no stranger to Philadelphia Orchestra audiences at the Mann Music Center (or at the Academy). Last season, the orchestra performed his violin concerto, commissioned by concertmaster Norman Carol. The longtime music director of the Minneapolis Symphony (now the Minnesota Orchestra), he's presently the director of the Halle Orchestra in Manchester, England. Tonight: Cuban-born pianist Horacio Gutierrez solos tonight in the second Chopin concerto.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Five or six decades have passed since Herbert von Karajan's advocacy for Sibelius established an international sound concept on the composer's coattails. Polished and cool, Karajan's recordings of the Sibelius symphonies might have done more to advance the cause of ensemble perfection than of the composer. They were beautiful and superficial. And they were hardly the last word. Osmo Vänskä seemed to be dismantling Karajan's legacy phrase by phrase Sunday afternoon in a remarkable appearance with the orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music in Verizon Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When odd-pop icon Ben Folds opens the Philadelphia Orchestra's season at the Mann Music Center on Tuesday with his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra , the 47-year-old keyboardist will do what he's done best since releasing the goofy "Underground" in the late '90s: Confound audience expectation. First, he has to get his teeth fixed. "Man, it's not by choice," says Folds, sitting in a dentist's office in Nashville where he's currently recording his concerto. "I've been in the chair all year.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
A stagehand strike has forced the cancellation of Carnegie Hall's Wednesday night black-tie gala season-opener, at which the Philadelphia Orchestra was to have been the featured ensemble. The stagehands, represented by Local One of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, were working under a contract that expired Aug. 31, and called a strike at 8 a.m., according to a union statement. "Carnegie Hall sincerely regrets any inconvenience this strike will cause our artists, concertgoers, and everyone with whom we work," said Clive Gillinson, executive and artistic Director of Carnegie Hall.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
A story Thursday on taxidermy artist Beth Beverly misspelled the last name of Jen Cohan, who gave her dead dog to Beverly to be preserved. A story Thursday about the Philadelphia Orchestra incorrectly described the status of the Minnesota Orchestra's musicians. They have been locked out. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Just as conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin suggested a year ago, the Philadelphia Orchestra will follow him onto the prestigious Deutsche Grammophon recording label this spring, though so far only one disc is assured. After a string of performances of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring this month, the orchestra will record the groundbreaking 1913 ballet along with Leopold Stokowski Bach transcriptions in a disc that will be a tribute to the orchestra's first great music director. The pairing is unusual, even unprecedented.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Many cultural communities are truly going through the worst of times. The usually vital Minneapolis/St. Paul has both of its orchestras locked out. Elsewhere, one orchestra after another has staggered under financial problems. Philadelphia ain't rosy, but both the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia have pulled back from the brink. Individual artists persevered in ways that can only be described as noble. Composers, the backbone of any music community, kept putting out some of their best music in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
How much money is a principal oboist worth? A section violinist? What about the president of a struggling symphony orchestra? Or a third-grade teacher, for that matter? Not long ago, I found myself explaining to my tween son why certain things he covets - a trendy brand of ear phones, in this case - command a high price, and why price tags are often divorced from justice and logic. It has always been true and always will be: Nothing has intrinsic value; something fetches only what someone is willing to pay for it. What someone is willing to pay for orchestral musicians in this country has changed radically in recent weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There is nothing vaguely felt in Osmo V?nsk?'s Sibelius Symphony No. 2. He feels strongly about it all. When it's fast, it should be very fast. When it's stern or emphatic, the music scolds. Tenderness slows to the point where it threatens to dissolve. Many listeners will like his way with Sibelius' most popular symphony, which had a long history here before the Finnish conductor brought it to the Philadelphia Orchestra. But to anyone whose ear was set by any of the three Ormandy recordings of the work, V?nsk?'s interpretation may sound more like an act of perfidy than revelation.
NEWS
August 18, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's easy to forget how extraordinarily daring the Philadelphia Orchestra once was in entrusting its future to youth. Riccardo Muti and Eugene Ormandy were both under 40 when they were named music director. Stokowski was 30 (depending on when you believe he was born). Age is immaterial to musical worthiness - or at least it should be - as two concerts at Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart festival argued conclusively this weekend. This is an important issue to sort out as the orchestra ponders whether to go young, or makes the seemingly more practical choice of a musical grandfather with venerable name.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Osmo V?nsk? doesn't rehearse the Philadelphia Orchestra as much as he wrestles with sound. The mildly burly 53-year-old conductor is in black jeans and T-shirt, sliding on and off his chair and leaning over the second violins as if performing emergency surgery. He's not a tall man, but he seems to grow by a foot when in front of an orchestra, even though he spends a fair amount of time crouching. Being partially out of sight is his way of drawing a true pianissimo from the Philadelphia Orchestra.
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