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NEWS
August 24, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Green Party's effort to get on Pennsylvania's Nov. 7 election ballot was dealt another setback yesterday by a federal appeals court. While urging the state legislature to enact a "less ponderous means of ballot access for minor political parties," the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia upheld a state election code provision requiring Green Party and other minor-party candidates to obtain 67,070 valid voter signatures to...
NEWS
October 18, 2010
By Oliver Hall Pennsylvanians may notice something unusual when they go to the polls in November: Their choices for governor, lieutenant governor, and U.S. Senate will be limited exclusively to Republican and Democratic candidates. Only four other states' 2010 general-election ballots are so restrictive. What makes Pennsylvania unique, however - and suggests that something has gone seriously wrong here in the birthplace of America - is that the shortage of choices has been effectively imposed by the courts.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County lawyer Robert B. Surrick will have an easier time getting on November's ballot as a candidate for the state Supreme Court after a federal court ruling yesterday. How much easier won't be clear until at least Tuesday, after a hearing to determine how many signatures Surrick - the candidate of the H. Ross Perot- inspired Patriot Party - will need to get on the ballot. U.S. District Judge Edward N. Cahn ruled that a portion of Pennsylvania's ballot access law is unconstitutional.
NEWS
November 29, 1988 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The official vote tally certified by the City Commissioners yesterday showed that Democrat Michael S. Dukakis carried Philadelphia by 230,513 votes Nov. 8, a margin close to that run up by fellow Democrat Walter Mondale in 1984. That year, Mondale polled about 234,000 more votes than President Reagan. The difference between the two elections, however, was that turnout this year was more than three percentage points lower than in 1984, according to the vote count certified yesterday.
NEWS
March 26, 1986 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Three statewide candidates for the Consumer Party will appear on the May 20 primary ballot because of an order yesterday by a federal judge, who told the state Elections Bureau to accept their nominating petitions. The order by U.S. District Judge Norma Shapiro was a victory for the minor party and its founder, Max Weiner, who has been fighting provisions of a new state law that make it virtually impossible for the party's candidates to appear on the ballot. Under Shapiro's order, the party will be permitted to field its three candidates under the Consumer Party column: Bill W. Thorn Sr. for governor; Lance S. Haver for lieutenant governor, and Thelma R. Hambright for the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | By Ralph Nader
If you want to run for public office in Pennsylvania, and you're neither a Republican nor a Democrat, you'd better be prepared to bet the farm. Carl Romanelli learned that lesson the hard way after campaigning for U.S. Senate on the Green Party ticket in 2006. After a successful challenge to his nomination petitions by Democrats, represented by Thorp, Reed & Armstrong, the Commonwealth Court in Harrisburg charged Romanelli with more than $80,000 in litigation costs. Romanelli, a retired family court officer, says that would "destroy" him financially.
NEWS
October 24, 2001 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
At first, Lisa Williams thought her husband was joking. Saying he's quite serious, consumer activist Michael Morrill of West Reading announced yesterday that he would run for governor in 2002 under the Green Party banner. He pledged himself to a platform of reform, including an $11-an-hour minimum wage for Pennsylvania workers, universal health care, complete state funding of education, and an immediate end to "corporate welfare. " "Both of the old parties consider themselves pragmatists, which is another way of saying they are too dependent on polling, focus groups, and the opinions of wealthy benefactors," Morrill, 46, said.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Without public hearings in the waning hours of its session, the state Legislature passed and sent to Gov. Ridge a measure making it tougher for third-party and independent candidates to challenge the supremacy of the two dominant parties. By overwhelming bipartisan margins, lawmakers enacted a bill to greatly increase - in some cases nearly quadruple - the number of citizen signatures that minor-party candidates need to get on election ballots. Republican leaders say the intent is to end "frivolous" candidacies and make the election law fairer.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three weeks before Election Day, Republican U.S. Rep. Jon Fox and Democratic challenger Joe Hoeffel began the final round of their nearly yearlong election bout by knocking heads last night over Fox's record in the U.S. House and the influence of organized labor in the campaign. The forum was the auditorium of Abington Senior High School, where candidates for Congress in the 13th District met in a debate sponsored by the League of Women Voters. Fox, who won election two years ago by defeating Democratic incumbent Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky, portrayed himself as a politically independent Republican who owed allegiance only to the electorate.
NEWS
August 25, 1995
State Rep. David P. Richardson stood by his principles and fought for his beliefs. Here was a true brother, who when the going got tough, maintained his advocacy role for the African-American community and, undaunted by the opposition, spoke out for justice. Brother Dave was leader and spokesman for the legitimate aspirations of African-American people. He also responded to individual problems, which you knew either Brother Dave or someone in his local or Harrisburg legislative office would handle.
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NEWS
October 18, 2010
By Oliver Hall Pennsylvanians may notice something unusual when they go to the polls in November: Their choices for governor, lieutenant governor, and U.S. Senate will be limited exclusively to Republican and Democratic candidates. Only four other states' 2010 general-election ballots are so restrictive. What makes Pennsylvania unique, however - and suggests that something has gone seriously wrong here in the birthplace of America - is that the shortage of choices has been effectively imposed by the courts.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | By Ralph Nader
If you want to run for public office in Pennsylvania, and you're neither a Republican nor a Democrat, you'd better be prepared to bet the farm. Carl Romanelli learned that lesson the hard way after campaigning for U.S. Senate on the Green Party ticket in 2006. After a successful challenge to his nomination petitions by Democrats, represented by Thorp, Reed & Armstrong, the Commonwealth Court in Harrisburg charged Romanelli with more than $80,000 in litigation costs. Romanelli, a retired family court officer, says that would "destroy" him financially.
NEWS
September 5, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While the GOP was anointing its presidential ticket in Minnesota this week, a Philadelphia Democrat was scheming to all but eliminate Republicans on City Council. City Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. said yesterday he would introduce a bill this fall to shrink Council from 17 to 15 members by reducing the number of at-large seats from seven to five. If the legislation passed and voters approved a change to the 1951 City Charter, a provision guaranteeing two at-large seats for minority parties would also vanish.
NEWS
October 10, 2007 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the last four presidential elections, the Republican redoubts of Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks Counties fell to the Democrats as suburban voters continued to rebel against the national GOP's rightward shift. Only Chester County stayed loyal. Now, a distinctly local issue threatens allegiance to the GOP: sprawl. Republicans who have held onto the county courthouse for 148 years are in a brawl this year as Democratic challengers for county commissioner in the Nov. 6 election say that the Republicans have done too little to stop Chester County from being chewed up by development.
NEWS
August 24, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Green Party's effort to get on Pennsylvania's Nov. 7 election ballot was dealt another setback yesterday by a federal appeals court. While urging the state legislature to enact a "less ponderous means of ballot access for minor political parties," the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia upheld a state election code provision requiring Green Party and other minor-party candidates to obtain 67,070 valid voter signatures to...
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
With time running out for Congress this year, Democrats are displaying rare unity and influencing the legislative agenda in ways that were unimaginable during President Bush's first term. Their cohesion, together with rebellion from some moderate and maverick Republicans, was evident yesterday as lawmakers continued to frustrate Bush's agenda on antiterrorism legislation, foreign-detainee policies, and oil drilling in Alaska's wildlife refuge. Republican leaders also are on the verge of delaying until next year nearly $100 billion in tax-cut legislation, depriving the party of a signature issue as it heads into the 2006 elections.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was expected that the race for the Eighth Congressional District would have been an easy one - that Republican U.S. Rep. James C. Greenwood, a popular, moderate six-term incumbent, would handily defeat Virginia "Ginny" Schrader, the Democratic candidate, and two minor-party candidates, Libertarian Arthur L. Farnsworth and Erich Lukas of the Constitution Party. But when Greenwood dropped out of the race last July, Republicans chose Bucks County Commissioner Michael G. Fitzpatrick to replace him, saying Fitzpatrick, a lifelong county resident, was the best candidate to enter the race midstream - and win. The district, which covers all of Bucks County and portions of Montgomery County and Philadelphia, is an important one for Republicans who want to continue to control Congress, and for Democrats who hope to wrest away that power.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
N.J. court should uphold the election law The Inquirer editorial of Oct. 1 ("The Torch is past") is wrong to dismiss the other candidates in the N.J. Senate race simply because "New Jersey voters have no history of voting in droves for minor-party candidates. " Sen. Torricelli's departure speech is just one last desperate effort to manipulate the democratic process. He should be left on the ballot so that he and his party suffer the humiliating consequences of supporting corruption in politics.
NEWS
October 1, 2002
Robert G. Torricelli finally did the right thing yesterday. He quit his reelection campaign for the U.S. Senate seat that he has dishonored and abused. That was the right thing to do, but he may have done it too late to help Democratic voters in New Jersey who might like a chance to vote for a party nominee without a huge ethical cloud. There's a reason this politician has the memorable nickname of "The Torch. " He does what he does with a single-minded intensity that's hard to ignore, whether it's butting in front of the Senate seniority system or raising $100 million to help Democrats win Senate seats.
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | By Larry Eichel
In my years writing about politics, I've never figured out how to deal with minor-party candidates. News organizations don't feel compelled to give them nearly as much coverage as the Republicans and Democrats. That's because they have no real chance of winning statewide, absent an issue that captures the moment or a celebrity candidate with money to burn. But if they get their names on the ballot, it doesn't seem right to ignore them, or kiss them off with a perfunctory mention every now and then.
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