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Minority Group

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NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Promising to be more independent and vocal, the Gloucester County Minority Coalition last week voted to replace its old officers with political newcomers and to endorse two maverick Democratic candidates for the freeholder board. "It's a new day for us," said Frank Minor, a business owner from Logan who was elected coalition president on April 20. "We will be vocal. We will be out there. And we have no room for negativity. " The coalition voted to endorse East Greenwich Mayor Dalyn Currey and Willie Carter of Monroe as freeholder candidates in the June 6 primary.
NEWS
February 7, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Joe Dougherty joined the Ironworkers Local 401 four decades ago, the Philadelphia union's idea of diversity was bringing in an Italian ironworker from South Philly. How vanilla was it? Not only was this union nearly 100 percent white, but it was nearly 100 percent Irish, too - and not just any Irish either. Most members were descendants of immigrants from Newfoundland. Now, the 804-member still-primarily-Irish local is one of the most diverse of the Philadelphia building trades.
NEWS
April 23, 1986
Your powerful April 14 editorial "Reclaim America from NRA" is at once both accurate and frightening. That a cowering Congress trembles with fear before this monied, selfish organization is reprehensible. That such a minority group of self-serving "sportsmen" has triumphed over law-enforcement officers who are expected to lay down their very lives while protecting us from heinous crimes is unconscionable. Politicians need not wonder why voters, in increasing numbers, are choosing disappearance over duty during elections.
NEWS
July 11, 1992
THE PRESS WAS PART OF OF THE PROBLEM Many a Pulitzer has been won by covering the woes of the inner city. But no one is there day by day to cover the issues that are standard in the coverage of any white middle-class area. While zoning and planning may not be a reporter's dream subjects, they provide an infrastructure of a community. When residents lose control of the infrastructure, they lose control of the community. The newspapers say there are valid economic reasons for ignoring South Los Angeles and other areas like it. The industry calls it "bad demographics.
NEWS
June 15, 2009
LETTER-writer Hannibal Casanova seems to believe you can only be labeled a "racist" if you belong to a majority group. And for those not in a majority group, the worst you can be called is prejudiced or hateful or biased, implying that these labels somehow describe you as less hurtful and hate-filled than a racist. I've heard this argument used before by those with an agenda, so I looked up "racist" in Webster's and other references to get some insight. Not a single definition limited the term to those in the majority or those with any real or perceived "power to inflict suffering on any other group," as Casanova puts it. I did find that every definition used terms like "biased" or "bigoted" or "prejudiced" - the very same terms Casanova says can be applied to those in a minority group.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
African Americans and other minorities will have an opportunity for partial ownership of one of the city's cable franchises under a plan approved by City Council yesterday. At issue was the sale of the city's Area II franchise - serving West Philadelphia, Roxborough, Manayunk, Overbrook and Nicetown-Tioga - to industry giant Time-Warner. The sale was part of a package deal in which Time-Warner was to pay $2.8 billion for the 600 franchises nationwide that constitute Cablevision Industries.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | by Joanne Weintraub, For the Daily News
The conventional wisdom in some quarters is that television is politically correct. No one dares make a harmless joke or mildly negative observation about any minority group, this line of thinking goes, for fear of being labeled a bigot. This is a pretty dubious proposition to start with - fake Spanish accents, for instance, are still quite the thing among Anglo comedians - but it falls apart completely when it comes to one particular group. It's always open season on Arabs. Comics mock them freely.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Diaa Hadid and Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syria's main opposition group on Sunday picked a secular Kurd as its new leader after criticism that the former head was too autocratic and the group was becoming dominated by Islamists. The opposition, hobbled by disorganization and infighting, is trying to pull together and appear more inclusive by choosing a member of an ethnic minority. The opposition's disarray has frustrated Western powers eager to dislodge Syrian President Bashar Assad but unwilling or unable to send in their own forces to do it. There has been some willingness to support the rebels with funds and arms, but the lack of a cohesive front or a single address has hampered the efforts as the bloodshed intensifies.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | BY MUBARAK S. DAHR
When Philadelphia Democrats went to the primary polls two weeks ago, everyone's attention was on the challenge to Council President John Street by realtor Julie Welker. We all know, of course, that Street won. But the tallied votes don't tell the whole story about winners in this election. Although the gay and lesbian community was a strong part of the coalition that supported Street's challenger, we were still winners. What we won was less tangible than a Council seat and less measurable than counted votes.
NEWS
January 22, 1986 | BY DAVE BARRY
I think we can all agree that there is not enough common courtesy shown . . . HEY! PAY ATTENTION WHEN I'M TALKING TO YOU, DAMMIT! I said I think we can all agree that there is not enough common courtesy shown today. When we take the time to be courteous to each other, we find that we are happier and less likely to engage in nuclear war. This point was driven home by the recent summit talks, where Nancy Reagan and Raisa Gorbachev, each of whose husband thinks the other's husband is vermin, were able to sit down at a high-level tea, and engage in courteous conversation: MRS. REAGAN (smiling so hard that little clots of her makeup are breaking off, and falling into the cream pitcher)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 5, 2012 | From Inquirer Wire Services
NFL quarterback Peyton Manning, wife Ashley, and former NBA player Penny Hardaway have agreed to join the group of minority owners for the Memphis Grizzlies, said a person familiar with the deal. The Mannings and Hardaway join a minority group that includes singer and actor Justin Timberlake and a couple of Memphis businessmen, the person told the Associated Press on Thursday on condition of anonymity because prospective buyer Robert J. Pera's purchase of the Grizzlies is pending approval by the NBA. Pera, owner of a California tech company, agreed to buy the Grizzlies from Michael Heisley in June for $350 million.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Diaa Hadid and Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syria's main opposition group on Sunday picked a secular Kurd as its new leader after criticism that the former head was too autocratic and the group was becoming dominated by Islamists. The opposition, hobbled by disorganization and infighting, is trying to pull together and appear more inclusive by choosing a member of an ethnic minority. The opposition's disarray has frustrated Western powers eager to dislodge Syrian President Bashar Assad but unwilling or unable to send in their own forces to do it. There has been some willingness to support the rebels with funds and arms, but the lack of a cohesive front or a single address has hampered the efforts as the bloodshed intensifies.
NEWS
November 29, 2011
ACCORDING to certain experts, at the foundation of the 99 percent protest against the top 1 percent is the fact that the latter in some way have caused the wages of the middle class to remain comparatively flat for three decades, thereby forcing them to sustain a mostly consumer economy through the use of credit cards and home-equity loans. The media now portray the 99 percent as fighting to retain various safety-net programs and entitlements. But, throughout these same three decades, the top 1 percent convinced the middle class that most of our economic problems were attributed to blacks and other minorities and their obsession with undeserved entitlements like welfare and the like.
NEWS
July 15, 2009 | By Trudy Rubin
It is the last place where you'd expect to find a school that teaches about civic rights - and has links to Philadelphia's National Constitution Center. But after driving an hour from central Kabul, over potholed roads jammed with trucks, cars, motorbikes, and carts, and then maneuvering along a narrow, rutted dirt track and through wheel-deep puddles of water, we reached the Marefat school. The two-story, pale-green, concrete building is built around a courtyard, with a balcony opening onto second-story classrooms.
NEWS
June 15, 2009
LETTER-writer Hannibal Casanova seems to believe you can only be labeled a "racist" if you belong to a majority group. And for those not in a majority group, the worst you can be called is prejudiced or hateful or biased, implying that these labels somehow describe you as less hurtful and hate-filled than a racist. I've heard this argument used before by those with an agenda, so I looked up "racist" in Webster's and other references to get some insight. Not a single definition limited the term to those in the majority or those with any real or perceived "power to inflict suffering on any other group," as Casanova puts it. I did find that every definition used terms like "biased" or "bigoted" or "prejudiced" - the very same terms Casanova says can be applied to those in a minority group.
NEWS
February 7, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Joe Dougherty joined the Ironworkers Local 401 four decades ago, the Philadelphia union's idea of diversity was bringing in an Italian ironworker from South Philly. How vanilla was it? Not only was this union nearly 100 percent white, but it was nearly 100 percent Irish, too - and not just any Irish either. Most members were descendants of immigrants from Newfoundland. Now, the 804-member still-primarily-Irish local is one of the most diverse of the Philadelphia building trades.
NEWS
February 5, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
One in five members of local construction unions belongs to a minority group, according to numbers released yesterday by the unions in the lead-up to City Council's vote to move ahead with the $700 million Convention Center expansion. City Council had threatened to hold up the expansion if unions did not increase minority participation. However, more than half of the 4,442 minority union members come from Laborers International Union of North America Local 332 - a predominantly African American union.
NEWS
November 25, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nancy Czarnecki was one of six women in Jefferson Medical College in 1961, when women were first admitted. There were 151 men, and not all of them were happy with Jefferson's new policy. "You don't belong here," one male student told her. "You are taking the place of a man who needs to support his family. " Czarnecki, now 62, recalls she responded that she, too, intended to work and support her family, but he wasn't convinced. Today, 45 percent of Jefferson's students are women.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Howard Fuller is a man who knows a lot about school choice. He was superintendent in Milwaukee during the early days of tuition vouchers and was often invited to speak about the program at conferences. Each time he spoke, all he saw was a sea of white faces. "You cannot have a movement for black children and brown children when they are not represented in this room," Fuller, who is black, finally told one audience. The situation prompted him to help found a national organization that specifically deals with minorities and school choice - the Black Alliance for Educational Options.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | By Carolyn Feibel FOR THE INQUIRER
Janice Warner, a 67-year-old social worker and therapist whose mother was white and father was American Indian, will never forget the teasing she heard as a child on the school playground. "You're going to scalp me!" her classmates would shout before running off. Or, "There's no Indians around anymore!" It would be years before Warner, who now lives in Plainfield, N.J., could fully explore those experiences and how they affected her psyche. Though her first therapist, a white man, was very helpful, "when it got to race he was a little out to lunch," Warner recalled.
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