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Minority Leader

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NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG ? Federal agents this morning raided the home and district office of Sen. Minority Leader Robert J. Mellow (D., Lackawanna), federal authorities have confirmed. It is unclear what time the raid occurred and what was taken from the two locations. FBI special agent Frank Burton Jr. would say only: "Based on an ongoing joint federal investigation into alleged illegal activities of Sen. Robert Mellow, those search warrants were executed this morning. " Mellow could not be reached for immediate comment.
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON With the election over and Democrats holding majorities in both houses of the Legislature, they and Republicans chose one new leader and reelected three others Thursday, though not without some dissension. Senate Minority Leader Thomas Kean Jr. (R., Union) survived a challenge from Sen. Kevin O'Toole (R., Passaic) to retain his leadership position. Senate Republicans voted to reelect Kean, 10-6. Republicans failed to pick up seats in the Senate after a high-profile bid by Kean to oust Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
August 29, 2005
THE WAY the state legislative pay increase was slammed through shows a leadership that is insensitive to both the desires of their rank and file and, even worse, the people who elected them. Legislators need to remember that they report to the people of their districts, not the legislative leaders or the governor. Demoting 15 Democratic subcommittee chairmen who voted against the raise and promoting 15 who voted for it may be legal and business as usual, but it stinks to high heaven.
NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey state Senate President Stephen Sweeney has cut a fund for Senate Republicans following a feud with the chamber's Republican leader. Republicans were notified late Friday of Sweeney's plans to cut from $330,000 to $188,000 a leadership fund that has traditionally been distributed to Senate Republicans for legislative staffing, sources said. The funding is in addition to annual allocations lawmakers receive for staffing, which have not been trimmed. Previously, Sen. Thomas H. Kean Jr. (R., Union)
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | Associated Press
PARSIPPANY, N.J. - Family, friends, and New Jersey's major political figures paid final respects to Assembly Republican leader Alex DeCroce on Friday. More than 1,000 mourners filled St. Peter Apostle Church or DeCroce's Funeral Mass. Gov. Christie and his wife, Mary Pat, escorted DeCroce's widow, Betty Lou, into the church. Christie delivered a eulogy to a man he considered a mentor. Christie postponed his State of the State address after DeCroce, 75, collapsed and died at the Statehouse late Monday following a marathon lame-duck legislative session.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | by Charles Peters, New York Times
Congress is back in session, but there is little hope it will accomplish much before returning to the campaign trail. The main reason for pessimism is the naysayers who control all but a handful of the Republican members in both houses and who use procedural maneuvers - including an unprecedented number of threatened filibusters - to endow a minority with the power to impose gridlock. One reason I feel this way may be that I am a liberal Democrat. But there is a relentless negativism, even nastiness, about the Republican leadership that I believe offends people of good will, regardless of ideology.
NEWS
July 25, 2007
As Pennsylvania Sen. Hugh Scott's chief of staff during the entire Watergate saga, I was interested to read Trudy Rubin's column Sunday and see the parallels between then and now. I would suggest that what Scott did took more political courage than any action being considered by any Republican senator now. The end game then was an incumbent president's removal from office. Scott, who was the minority leader, led moderate senators in the so-called eastern Republican establishment, yet reached out to Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona, leader of the party's conservative wing, to meet with President Nixon.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In the halls of the historic state Capitol, everything old is new again, even the leaders. The state House of Representatives returned Tuesday after its monthlong election break with one pressing agenda item: choosing the men (and one woman) who will lead the Democratic and Republican caucuses in the 2012-13 legislative session. The faces are largely the same. House Speaker Sam Smith (R., Jefferson) and Majority Leader Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny) were unanimously reelected by the GOP caucus.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | By Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden County Democratic chairman George E. Norcross 3d, in a bid for greater statewide clout and access to millions more in campaign funds, has been trying to broker a deal that would elevate a close ally to one of the top positions in the state Senate. Last night, on the eve of the vote by the Senate Democrats, it appeared that Norcross had only partially succeeded. He has helped get a promotion - for State Sen. John H. Adler of Cherry Hill. But Adler will have to share the post - and Norcross the power - with two other senators because Norcross failed to topple the senator who now holds the post.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Rich Heidorn Jr. and Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
For two years, they have been a sideshow in the state capital, sniping at Gov. Florio and Democratic legislative leaders but never allowed into the big tent where policy was decided. But when Sen. John H. Dorsey (R., Morris) and Assemblymen Garabed "Chuck" Haytaian (R., Warren) and Bob Franks (R., Union) held a news conference yesterday to celebrate the Republicans' decisive takeover of the legislature, they were finally in the center ring. For Franks, 40, the blond-haired GOP party chairman, the resounding victory added a credit to the resume some think he may take to the 1993 gubernatorial primary.
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NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey state Senate President Stephen Sweeney has cut a fund for Senate Republicans following a feud with the chamber's Republican leader. Republicans were notified late Friday of Sweeney's plans to cut from $330,000 to $188,000 a leadership fund that has traditionally been distributed to Senate Republicans for legislative staffing, sources said. The funding is in addition to annual allocations lawmakers receive for staffing, which have not been trimmed. Previously, Sen. Thomas H. Kean Jr. (R., Union)
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON With the election over and Democrats holding majorities in both houses of the Legislature, they and Republicans chose one new leader and reelected three others Thursday, though not without some dissension. Senate Minority Leader Thomas Kean Jr. (R., Union) survived a challenge from Sen. Kevin O'Toole (R., Passaic) to retain his leadership position. Senate Republicans voted to reelect Kean, 10-6. Republicans failed to pick up seats in the Senate after a high-profile bid by Kean to oust Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In the halls of the historic state Capitol, everything old is new again, even the leaders. The state House of Representatives returned Tuesday after its monthlong election break with one pressing agenda item: choosing the men (and one woman) who will lead the Democratic and Republican caucuses in the 2012-13 legislative session. The faces are largely the same. House Speaker Sam Smith (R., Jefferson) and Majority Leader Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny) were unanimously reelected by the GOP caucus.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | Associated Press
PARSIPPANY, N.J. - Family, friends, and New Jersey's major political figures paid final respects to Assembly Republican leader Alex DeCroce on Friday. More than 1,000 mourners filled St. Peter Apostle Church or DeCroce's Funeral Mass. Gov. Christie and his wife, Mary Pat, escorted DeCroce's widow, Betty Lou, into the church. Christie delivered a eulogy to a man he considered a mentor. Christie postponed his State of the State address after DeCroce, 75, collapsed and died at the Statehouse late Monday following a marathon lame-duck legislative session.
NEWS
November 5, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In recent years, many have pushed for cutting the size of the Pennsylvania legislature: reformers, think tanks, candidates for office. But now the call for shrinking the 203-member House of Representatives comes from an unlikely source: one of those 203 members. And not just any one - the representative who, come January, is expected to become House speaker. Fresh off his party's victories at the polls, House Minority Leader Sam Smith (R., Jefferson) on Wednesday said he would like to see the chamber's ranks trimmed - for the simple reason that he believed it would make it easier to get things done in the Capitol.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG ? Federal agents this morning raided the home and district office of Sen. Minority Leader Robert J. Mellow (D., Lackawanna), federal authorities have confirmed. It is unclear what time the raid occurred and what was taken from the two locations. FBI special agent Frank Burton Jr. would say only: "Based on an ongoing joint federal investigation into alleged illegal activities of Sen. Robert Mellow, those search warrants were executed this morning. " Mellow could not be reached for immediate comment.
NEWS
July 14, 2009
Another great thing about being a Pennsylvania legislator is that you can invalidate a law if it's hurting your ability to earn some extra cash. Consider the case of Senate minority leader Robert J. Mellow (D., Lackawanna). He's the longest-serving senator in Harrisburg, so you know he excels at looking out for Number One. As The Inquirer reported yesterday, Mellow charged taxpayers $200,000 over seven years for rent on his district office near Scranton in a building co-owned by his then-wife and later by himself.
NEWS
July 25, 2007
As Pennsylvania Sen. Hugh Scott's chief of staff during the entire Watergate saga, I was interested to read Trudy Rubin's column Sunday and see the parallels between then and now. I would suggest that what Scott did took more political courage than any action being considered by any Republican senator now. The end game then was an incumbent president's removal from office. Scott, who was the minority leader, led moderate senators in the so-called eastern Republican establishment, yet reached out to Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona, leader of the party's conservative wing, to meet with President Nixon.
NEWS
November 4, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A captain never abandons his ship. So said State House Minority Leader H. William DeWeese (D., Fayette) yesterday in explaining why he was one of only two lawmakers Wednesday night to vote against repealing the controversial legislative pay raises. In a prepared statement, DeWeese said he believed that he "had no other recourse than to be consistent in my public position" - a reference to the fact that he has not wavered in his support of a pay raise for the legislature. "The inherent responsibility of the captain is to stay with the ship and work unstintingly on behalf of the people who serve with him," added DeWeese, the top Democrat in the House.
NEWS
September 21, 2005 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) said yesterday that he would vote against confirming John G. Roberts Jr. as chief justice. His opposition will not change the outcome. The Republican-controlled Senate is still expected to confirm Roberts, probably next week, to head the Supreme Court. But it could increase pressure on other fence-sitting Democrats such as Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York to vote no. It also could embolden President Bush to pick a more controversial nominee for the remaining court vacancy, increasing the chances of a more contentious fight.
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