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NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A nearly unanimous City Council passed a new youth curfew Thursday after a long and raucous hearing dominated by often-heated testimony against the measure. The 15-1 vote sent a chamber full of opponents into chants of, "Shame! Shame!" As they filed out, they chanted, "We need schools, not the curfew. " The bill's sponsor, Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, praised those who spoke out, but said many of their concerns had been addressed in a bill the city needed.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
The manager of a pool hall in Doylestown Borough and another man have been charged with providing beer to minors during a New Year's party that got out of hand, borough police said Thursday. Manager Victor Mayda, 39, of Philadelphia, and Brian Best, 21, of Furlong, were charged Tuesday under the state Liquor Control Act for serving beer to minors during a private party at the Billiard Club on Atkinson Drive, which Best had organized, said Sgt. Joe Kissel. Best had bought soda for the youths, who were 15 and older, and some cases of beer for those of legal age, but other youths came whom Best did not know, Kissel said, and "the party got out of control.
SPORTS
April 10, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
After just four games against the Phillies, Atlanta's Mark Wohlers was sent to the minors. Again. The righthanded closer was a flop in two relief appearances in the Braves' first four games of the season. Atlanta manager Bobby Cox said Wohlers would report to triple-A Richmond. The 29-year-old, who lost his closer job last season when he couldn't throw strikes, agreed to go back down to the minors to try to regain his form. Wohlers was not available for comment. He faced three batters in Thursday night's 6-3 loss to the Phillies, walking two batters on four consecutive balls and throwing a sacrifice wildly over first baseman Ryan Klesko's head before Cox removed him. The Phillies tied an NL record by using five pitchers in the eighth inning of their win Thursday night against the Braves.
NEWS
December 19, 1986
Fund-raising events are given in such forms as chance drives, carnivals or beef-and-beers in different parts of Philadelphia. Organizations initiate these events for the benefit of a needy foundation. They are all rather harmless, except for beef-and-beers. A beef-and-beer, sometimes known as a ten-dollar night, consists of a donation ($10 or more) entitling the purchaser to four hours of food, beer and dancing. These beef-and-beers sound harmless and very enjoyable and profitable for the host, but to neighbors of the Port Richmond area they are nothing but problems.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Paul Graeser would ply the two 12-year-old girls with liquor, make them dance naked and wait for them to pass out. Then he would rape them. How do authorities know? Graeser, 47, made it easy. He videotaped the encounters at his home on Smedley Street near Moyamensing Avenue in South Philadelphia. Yesterday, after Graeser, a tow-truck operator, pleaded guilty to rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse and corrupting the morals of minors, Assistant District Attorney Charles Ehrlich asked Common Pleas Judge Anne E. Lazarus to view the tapes before the scheduled July sentencing.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons' game with Columbus was halted because of rain last night in Moosic, Pa., after the top of the third inning. It will be resumed as part of a doubleheader tonight. The Red Barons were leading, 3-2, when the triple-A Alliance game was stopped. The teams will meet at 6 tonight to complete the game, which will go nine innings. The game originally scheduled for tonight will last just seven innings, the standard length of league games that are part of doubleheaders.
SPORTS
November 20, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Pittsburgh Penguins yesterday sent 14-year NHL veteran Wilf Paiement to Muskegon of the International Hockey League "to get his game back in order," said general manager Eddie Johnston. Paiement, a 32-year-old right winger, has only two goals and five assists in 17 games this season. He has never played a minor-league game in his pro career. Paiement was signed as a free agent in July after scoring 20 goals and collecting 17 assists for Buffalo last season. Former Vancouver Canucks defenseman Jiri Bubla has been convicted in an Austrian court for playing a role in an international drug-smuggling ring, a Royal Canadian Mounted Police spokesman in Vancouver said.
SPORTS
May 1, 1990 | By Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Phillies righthander Todd Frohwirth said last night he's considering becoming a free agent rather than reporting to Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. All major league teams had to reduce their rosters from 27 to no more than 25 by midnight yesterday. Called in to get the bad news after last night's game were righthander Brad Moore and Frohwirth. "They were the two that weren't getting enough work," manager Nick Leyva explained. "Todd Frohwirth needs to pitch on a daily basis to be successful and there's no way he could do that here.
SPORTS
July 4, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Salomon Torres, San Francisco's struggling rookie righthander, was optioned to triple-A Phoenix, ending a tumultuous 24-game stint in the majors. Torres, 22, was sent down to make room for Mark Portugal, who was activated from the disabled list. "I told him, 'Just go down and work hard and learn to relax,' " Giants manager Dusty Baker said. Torres (2-8) had lost six straight starts. Frustrated, he left the Giants on June 19 without permission, missing a team flight to Cincinnati.
SPORTS
June 28, 1989 | By Peter Pascarelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies appear ready to dispatch Floyd Youmans to the minor leagues rather than release him. General manager Lee Thomas said last night that he was leaning in that direction, although a decision on the disappointing pitcher is not likely until Friday, when the Phillies will return home. "One option would be to release him or outright him," Thomas said. "Another option would be for him to go to the minors, and we will decide in the next day or two what to do. "He's not going to start for us right now, with the way he's been throwing.
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NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seated at the defense table in U.S. Immigration Court in Philadelphia, the 10-year-old looked down at his feet, which barely reached the floor. Coal-eyed, he resembled a Latino Dennis the Menace, with a "fauxhawk" instead of a cowlick and clad in a shirt that read: Last name: Maker. First name: Trouble. Having entered the U.S. illegally eight months ago, the boy, Carlos, was arrested on the Texas border, given a notice to appear in court to face deportation, and sent to live with his mother in Kensington while his case plays out. As with other juveniles in this article, The Inquirer agreed to use only his first name.
SPORTS
October 8, 2014
T HE PHILLIES announced the hiring of Rafael Chaves as the minor league pitching coordinator yesterday. Chaves, 46, was the Los Angeles Dodgers' minor league coordinator from 2009 to 2013 before spending the past season as a player personnel special assistant with the Dodgers. "We are extremely excited to add Rafael to our staff," Phillies director of player development Joe Jordan said. "He brings a wealth of knowledge and experience and is one of the most respected names in our business when it comes to developing pitchers.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014
Two Phillies underwent surgery, another had yet to schedule his, and an expensive arm passed a recent test. Cliff Lee underwent yet another MRI exam on his strained left elbow last Friday. The examination "yielded positive results as his flexor tendon is healing well," the team said Wednesday in a statement. Lee remains on target to begin a throwing program in November. He is owed $37.5 million in 2015 (including a buyout at season's end), and remains one of the team's most looming questions.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
FOR MINORITIES, women or members of other historically disadvantaged groups who run businesses, leveling the playing field has always been a key goal. As Philadelphia celebrates its 30th annual Minority Enterprise Development (MED) Week from Sept. 28 to Oct. 4, its playing field is still uneven and barriers such as inadequate capital or technical expertise remain. To help cope with those challenges, the week will feature free workshops and panel discussions, a tour of the Philadelphia Navy Yard and an awards program.
SPORTS
September 15, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
While the Phillies minor-league systems needs improvement, there are some intriguing prospects emerging. Here is a look at some of them. (This list doesn't include players such as Maikel Franco and Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez, who were promoted to the Phillies on Sept. 2 after the minor-league season ended and the MLB rosters expanded.)   Solid showings J.P. Crawford, SS, Clearwater. Crawford began the year at Lakewood and more than held his own when promoted to Clearwater, hitting .275 with eight home runs, 29 RBIs, and a .759 OPS. He turns 20 in January and could begin next season at Reading.
SPORTS
August 20, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
LeSEAN MCCOY practiced yesterday, and McCoy said afterward he had sat out Sunday's workout with "a small version of turf toe. " Mini-turf-toe? Turf-toe Lite? Micro-turf-toe? We'll let you consult your own medical dictionary. Meanwhile, McCoy said the injury to his left big toe occurred during last week's practices with the Patriots, and even though "it bothered me during the game . . . I was trying to play through it. It was hurting pretty bad," and Sunday "was at an all-time high, as far as pain, from the morning, 'til I got here," he wanted to get back onto the field yesterday.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a question that perplexes management researchers who try to figure out why the glass ceiling is so hard to crack, particularly now that there are more minorities and women in the work world. Why is it, they ask, that women and minorities who successfully climb the corporate ladder so often pull it up behind them, not helping other women and minorities succeed? "It's sacrificing your own future if you leave the ladder down," David Hekman, an assistant professor of management at the University of Colorado, told a roomful of scholars and managers attending the Academy of Management conference in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the region's deteriorating bridges and ailing train stations is lucrative opportunity for a niche of businesses also in need of a helping hand: small, minority, and female contractors. SEPTA is trying to play matchmaker. With the agency planning more than $570 million in Philadelphia-area capital projects over the next two years - and more than $6.8 billion by 2026 - the transportation agency made a pitch Tuesday to involve more so-called Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in that work.
SPORTS
July 24, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies summoned Darin Ruf to the manager's office June 1. He was being optioned to triple-A Lehigh Valley because a taxed bullpen required another arm. Go to the minors for the mandatory 10 days, the Phillies told him, and come back primed for more playing time. Ruf returned Tuesday, 51 days after his demotion. He crashed into a wall at Coca-Cola Park in Allentown in the first inning of his first minor-league game June 2. He fractured his left wrist and cut his right knee. "It's definitely been a mentally challenging season for me," Ruf said.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
THERE HAVE been some recent stirrings of reasonableness in Washington over the humanitarian crisis at the Mexican border, stirrings that should be supported and nurtured like, well, a child. But let's not fool ourselves: The proposals being bandied about address current political and bureaucratic problems, but they will do little to resolve the instability and violence propelling tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors out of Central America. Street gangs, drug cartels, ineffectual local government and corruption have destabilized neighborhoods and cities in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador.
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