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Miracle Worker

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NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
One of the most famous lines in the contemporary American theater consists of the single word "Water. " It is uttered in the closing moments of The Miracle Worker by the blind and deaf Helen Keller, age 7, and it is the first thing she says clearly in her young life. With water from an outside pump washing over her hands, the word means that she has at last done what her teacher, Annie Sullivan, has been trying to get her to do all along - put the word together with what it stands for. Then and there, Annie Sullivan's triumph has the force of dynamite.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services and the New York Post contributed to this report
You think Tattle portrays the late Princess Diana in a saintly light? Looks like canonization is just around the corner. Today, evidence of Di's first miracle! Liz Tilberis, editor of the fashion mag Harper's Bazaar, says Di saved her life. With a touch? With a prayer? No, with a phone call - but hey, it's the '90s. In a new memoir, "No Time to Die," Tilberis recounts her battle with ovarian cancer, and describes a day when she thought the end was near. "After a particularly drastic bout of chemotherapy, my blood cell count simply refused to rise and doctors would not discharge me from the isolation unit, where I was being treated," she wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There are few true American heroes whose reputations haven't been tarnished with time. Deaf and blind Helen Keller and her indefatigable teacher, Annie Sullivan, are two of them. Media Theatre's production of The Miracle Worker is only the latest to introduce William Gibson's adaptation of Keller's autobiography, The Story of My Life , to another generation, but it's a welcome introduction. Gibson's take on the Keller-Sullivan relationship has seen iterations on radio, television, film (three times)
NEWS
May 5, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Mark Twain dubbed Annie Sullivan, Helen Keller's teacher, the "Miracle Worker," and the play William Gibson wrote with that name many years later demonstrates just how appropriate a sobriquet Twain coined. When Sullivan, a 20-year-old New Englander, arrived in Alabama in 1887 to take charge of Helen, the 7-year-old child certainly was in need of a miracle. Left deaf and blind by meningitis at the age of 1 1/2, Helen couldn't communicate and was so uncontrollable that her parents were considering institutionalizing her. Yet in a few short weeks, Sullivan managed a communication breakthrough that set Helen on the road to a life of tremendous accomplishment.
SPORTS
November 8, 2001 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
La Salle officials waited to hire a new basketball coach. And waited. They waited 27 days in all before tabbing Billy Hahn, then only five days removed from a trip to the Final Four as the chief assistant at Maryland. They think the wait was worth it, and so does a portion of La Salle's long-suffering fan base. But Hahn doesn't claim any kind of magic. He isn't going to wave a wand and bring an Atlantic Ten Conference championship or an NCAA tournament bid to 20th and Olney in his first year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
GIMME FIVE Philadelphia native Arthur Penn died this week, leaving a body of work that moved fluidly between the monumental and the quirky. 1. "Bonnie and Clyde. " (1967) 2. "The Miracle Worker. " (1962) 3. "Alice's Restaurant. " (1969) 4. "Night Moves. " (1975) 5. "Little Big Man. " (1970)
SPORTS
April 5, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Dennis Rodman says the Los Angeles Lakers need him to succeed. Some of his teammates aren't so sure. "We can't afford another distraction from him," guard Derek Harper said in this week's edition of Newsweek magazine. "I'm not management, but if it happened again, that would be it. " Rodman has been late for practices and squabbled with coach Kurt Rambis. He also missed four games on a recent road trip because of undisclosed personal reasons. He was ejected Saturday night against Golden State, his two technical fouls increasing his season's total to 11. The rest of the team has 12 technicals.
SPORTS
July 27, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Don Sutton, the only player elected this year to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, thanked the ballplayers, coaches and managers on the five teams he played for in his 23-year pitching career. He then stared into the audience at his wife, Mary, and their 1-year-old daughter, Jackie, and grappled with the emotion of the moment. "This is what I've wanted all my life," said Sutton, who won 324 games and struck out 3,574. "But as big as this day is, it was all put into perspective a couple of years ago when she [Jackie]
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
IT DOESN'T TAKE a brain surgeon to make a man a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. But it definitely helps. Yesterday, Pope Benedict XVI approved the canonization of the Rev. Luigi Guanella after church officials concluded that prayers to the 19th-century Italian priest led to the miraculous recovery of William "Billy" Glisson Jr., who suffered a brutal head injury while rollerblading in Delaware County in 2002. Without the testimony of Dr. Richard Buonocore, the neurosurgeon who operated on Glisson at Crozer Chester Medical Center, the recovery might not have been attributed to Guanella - a requirement for sainthood.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THE NEXT TIME people tell me, "Newspapers are dead," I'll tell them about Denise Ferguson. In 2007, the two-story rowhouse attached to hers on Lambert Street in Point Breeze was torn down, all the way to the basement floor, by a developer who then abandoned the project, leaving a deep-holed eyesore. Ferguson convinced a man who'd worked on the property to at least fence it off from the sidewalk, so no one would fall in. It took a year, but the fence finally went up. Problem was, it had an 18-inch gap where it should have met the side wall of Ferguson's house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There are few true American heroes whose reputations haven't been tarnished with time. Deaf and blind Helen Keller and her indefatigable teacher, Annie Sullivan, are two of them. Media Theatre's production of The Miracle Worker is only the latest to introduce William Gibson's adaptation of Keller's autobiography, The Story of My Life , to another generation, but it's a welcome introduction. Gibson's take on the Keller-Sullivan relationship has seen iterations on radio, television, film (three times)
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THE NEXT TIME people tell me, "Newspapers are dead," I'll tell them about Denise Ferguson. In 2007, the two-story rowhouse attached to hers on Lambert Street in Point Breeze was torn down, all the way to the basement floor, by a developer who then abandoned the project, leaving a deep-holed eyesore. Ferguson convinced a man who'd worked on the property to at least fence it off from the sidewalk, so no one would fall in. It took a year, but the fence finally went up. Problem was, it had an 18-inch gap where it should have met the side wall of Ferguson's house.
SPORTS
November 12, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
As if it wasn't already clear, the Eagles confirmed Sunday that their season is beyond the point of repair. If the last hope of the hopeless, the untested rookie quarterback, can't turn things around and write a storybook ending to the season, then the Eagles will remain locked in the nonfiction aisle. And the facts there aren't pretty. Through no fault of his own, Nick Foles - the 6-foot-6 backup quarterback who had become a favorite for some fans simply because he isn't Michael Vick and because he hadn't yet failed - was forced to take part in the disaster that is the 2012 season.
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
IT DOESN'T TAKE a brain surgeon to make a man a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. But it definitely helps. Yesterday, Pope Benedict XVI approved the canonization of the Rev. Luigi Guanella after church officials concluded that prayers to the 19th-century Italian priest led to the miraculous recovery of William "Billy" Glisson Jr., who suffered a brutal head injury while rollerblading in Delaware County in 2002. Without the testimony of Dr. Richard Buonocore, the neurosurgeon who operated on Glisson at Crozer Chester Medical Center, the recovery might not have been attributed to Guanella - a requirement for sainthood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
GIMME FIVE Philadelphia native Arthur Penn died this week, leaving a body of work that moved fluidly between the monumental and the quirky. 1. "Bonnie and Clyde. " (1967) 2. "The Miracle Worker. " (1962) 3. "Alice's Restaurant. " (1969) 4. "Night Moves. " (1975) 5. "Little Big Man. " (1970)
NEWS
May 5, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Mark Twain dubbed Annie Sullivan, Helen Keller's teacher, the "Miracle Worker," and the play William Gibson wrote with that name many years later demonstrates just how appropriate a sobriquet Twain coined. When Sullivan, a 20-year-old New Englander, arrived in Alabama in 1887 to take charge of Helen, the 7-year-old child certainly was in need of a miracle. Left deaf and blind by meningitis at the age of 1 1/2, Helen couldn't communicate and was so uncontrollable that her parents were considering institutionalizing her. Yet in a few short weeks, Sullivan managed a communication breakthrough that set Helen on the road to a life of tremendous accomplishment.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITHLIFE EDITOR
Wendy Greer turned the sheet on the flip chart to reveal these words, written large for the class: "Every human being has a great, yet often unknown, gift to care, to be compassionate, to become present to the other, to listen, to hear, and to receive. If that gift would be set free and made available, miracles could take place. " Greer recited the words carefully, then said to her 35 listeners, "Everyone here today can be a miracle worker. . . . We are sent as beloved children of God to be ministers.
SPORTS
November 8, 2001 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
La Salle officials waited to hire a new basketball coach. And waited. They waited 27 days in all before tabbing Billy Hahn, then only five days removed from a trip to the Final Four as the chief assistant at Maryland. They think the wait was worth it, and so does a portion of La Salle's long-suffering fan base. But Hahn doesn't claim any kind of magic. He isn't going to wave a wand and bring an Atlantic Ten Conference championship or an NCAA tournament bid to 20th and Olney in his first year.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the bell rings at Penn Wood East Junior High School, the halls are filled with chatter, laughter, roving teens - and Pat Alford. "You've got three minutes to get to your next class. Now, get moving," Alford warmly advises the throngs passing through the corridors between class periods. "And take that gum out of your mouth!" In August, Alford, 49, became assistant principal of Penn Wood East, one of two junior high schools in the William Penn district. Now, every day, she talks with parents, advises students, commiserates with teachers, and strolls the hallways to maintain direct contact with the school's 700 students.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
A person born deaf is inexplicably cured. A child is given the ability to walk again. It takes faith and the ability to believe in something inexplicable - and incredible. It is a miracle. In a world where skepticism reigns in daily life, this leap of faith, this belief in the unbelievable, has somehow survived among Catholics who believe miracles still exist. Even after modern science and medicine chip away at classic Biblical miracle stories, the belief goes on. "Their basic reason is faith," said Sister Ruth Catherine Spain, director of the Mother Katharine Drexel Guild, located at the Mother Drexel shrine in Bensalem.
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