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Misery

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In his eloquently constructed morality tale Samba Traore, the gifted African filmmaker Idrissa Ouedraogo argues that if money doesn't buy happiness, stolen money is an invitation to misery. Such is the case with Samba, who wishes only to share his good luck upon his return to the friends and neighbors he left behind when he moved to the city. The trouble is that Samba's new-found wealth comes from a botched gas- station robbery, and he's on the run. Evocatively filmed in the West African nation of Burkina Faso, Samba Traore traces the path of the blood money and its negative impact on the village.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Renee Banson's concert at the Mandell Theater was a mini-reunion of former ZeroMoving Dance Company members - among them Michael Koob, Grace Zarnoch, Josh Walbert and Banson herself - and that was the happiest aspect of the evening. Most of the dances had depressing themes. In fact, in one of the program's talking dances, Koob explained - as he was yanked around by ropes tied to his waist - that the dance we were seeing came out of a recent depression. But at least Koob told us why he became unhappy.
SPORTS
February 28, 1989 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
Charles Barkley is not a good loser. Losing gnaws at his stomach and eats away at his pride. "I'm not very much fun to be around when we lose," the 76ers' forward said. "I take losing hard. I get very moody. Even now, when we lose, my wife keeps her distance from me because she knows what I'm like. " Barkley was moody a lot last year as the Sixers won just 36 games. "Last year was the worst thing that ever happened in my life," he said. So, Chuck, how would you like to play for the Los Angeles Clippers?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Los Angeles Times
Mental illness as depicted in the German road trip comedy/drama Vincent Wants to Sea is somewhere between a terrible affliction and a terribly funny affectation, depending on the manipulative needs of a hackneyed script. First there's twentysomething Tourette's syndrome sufferer Vincent (Florian David Fitz, also the screenwriter), institutionalized by his insensitive politician dad (Heino Ferch) after his caretaker mother dies. Escaping the hospital via stolen car on a quest to throw his mother's ashes into the ocean, he's joined by germphobic OCD patient Alex (Johannes Allmeyer)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Rob Reiner is one of the few directors who's been able to turn a Stephen King horror novel into a good picture. Maybe Reiner succeeds with King's stories because he doesn't make horror movies out of them. His "Stand By Me," though it centered on a search for a corpse, was actually a nostalgic look at boyhood friendship. Reiner turns "Misery" - the story of a crippled writer imprisoned and tortured by a crazed admirer - into a black comedy. James Caan stars as Paul Sheldon, famous for a string of pulp romance novels about a plucky heroine named Misery, a character he killed off in the last book of the popular series.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Rob Reiner's Misery, misery does indeed love company, and two is a crowd that no one in his right mind would care to join. Paul Sheldon, a celebrated and hugely successful novelist, is suffering from what might be called writer's blockade. He has broken both legs in a car accident in a Colorado blizzard, and now lies helpless before the attentions of a nurse who keeps him prisoner in her isolated house. Misery is based on the work of a celebrated and hugely successful novelist - Stephen King.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1991 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A truly scary thriller and a less-than-thrilling comedy top this week's list of new home videos. MISERY (1990) (Nelson) 107 minutes. Kathy Bates, James Caan, Richard Farnsworth, Lauren Bacall. Misery loves company and two is a crowd that no one in his right mind would care to join, as a famous writer, whose legs are broken in a car accident, finds himself the captive of a registered nurse who is also a certifiable lunatic and his biggest fan (Bates, in a performance that won her the best-actress Oscar)
SPORTS
July 5, 1997 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If this were a Broadway play, the show would have been declared a flop and canceled weeks ago. Stop the season, the Phillies want to get off. But this is major-league baseball, and while we use the term loosely, there still are schedules to be completed, players to be paid, TV time to be filled. So the show - woeful as it may be - must go on. Unfortunately, so does the Phillies' losing streak. That streak reached 11 games with yesterday's listless 9-3 loss to the Chicago Cubs at Veterans Stadium, where 14,378 mostly sarcastic fans made it sound like Wrigley Field.
NEWS
October 17, 2003
TO THE EVIL person who duct-taped that dog's mouth closed: You should rot in jail the same way - with your mouth and hands duct-taped. What kind of joy could you possibly get out of doing that to a helpless animal? I hope you're happy now - that dog had to be put to sleep and out of its misery. I hope they catch you and I know they will, but I hope your misery will last a lot longer. I will be at your trial, and I know a lot of animal-lovers will also be there. I sure hope you're well protected.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I was recently offered a job that pays substantially more than I make now. I'm overqualified but generally happy where I am. I wasn't looking; the offer fell in my lap. Though tempting in some ways - well, just financially, since we could really use the money right now - the thought of accepting the new job made me miserable. After much soul-searching and discussion with my husband, I turned it down. He is now livid, so seething angry that, months later, we still can't have a civil discussion about it. There are lots of under-the-breath comments and bitter, sarcastic remarks about my choosing my personal happiness over helping our family.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I was recently offered a job that pays substantially more than I make now. I'm overqualified but generally happy where I am. I wasn't looking; the offer fell in my lap. Though tempting in some ways - well, just financially, since we could really use the money right now - the thought of accepting the new job made me miserable. After much soul-searching and discussion with my husband, I turned it down. He is now livid, so seething angry that, months later, we still can't have a civil discussion about it. There are lots of under-the-breath comments and bitter, sarcastic remarks about my choosing my personal happiness over helping our family.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
For coat retailers, it's worse than a winter of discontent. It's one of deep discounts. The unseasonably warm weather and zero snow have left piles of unsold winter merchandise on stores' floors. While no one has tracked the overall losses, retail analysts say it's easily in the hundreds of millions of dollars for the year's last quarter, causing havoc at stores from Macy's to Burlington Coat Factory. All that red ink is a boon for consumers, though. This month, several retailers resorted to deep discounting of coats, which typically doesn't occur until February or March.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
In the lobby of the 1500 Locust Apartments, the pile of boxes bearing labels like Amazon, H&M, StitchFix, and GNC teetered at shoulder height on a recent afternoon. At the Pepper Building in Southwest Center City, the parcels threatened to overtake the concierge desk. And at West River Apartments, a 162-unit complex in the city's Wynnefield section, leasing consultant Whitney Chitty said there were as many as 50 packages coming in daily. In November, her office began sending out daily emails to notify residents that it had received packages - and that those not retrieved within a week would be returned to sender.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
BEACH HAVEN, N.J. - Steve Webb and his family didn't arrive on Long Beach Island until Sunday night, having attended their son's graduation at Elon University, in North Carolina, over the weekend. Webb, of Moorestown, has been going to LBI his whole life, and he was on the sand first thing Monday morning with his fishing rods to make the most of his time. And if he was worn out from all the driving, he wasn't complaining. "I saw dolphins out there earlier," said Webb, 53, gesturing out to where the sun sparkled off the ocean.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN THE OPENING MONTHS of Gov. Wolf's administration, Pennsylvanians are less miserable than they've been in years, according to a new poll. The Franklin & Marshall College Poll released yesterday found that only 39 percent of residents think the state is moving in the right direction - but that's still the best number in the past five years. Overall, the survey of 597 registered Pennsylvania voters found them generally positive about their new Democratic governor and key portions of his agenda, including his radical budget overhaul that would broadly change the state's tax structure and increase money for education.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia 76ers and Sacramento Kings were waging a who-is-worse contest on the court as Sixers CEO Scott O'Neil sat at a conference table in the bowels of the Wells Fargo Center and discussed the strategy behind the team's spectacular demise. To fans, the hoops franchise that hadn't won a championship in 31 years was in full-fledged "tanking" mode, closing in on the NBA losing-streak record of 26 - a gnarly milestone of a mangled season. The team, it seemed, had been built to lose.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Snap on the lights at Janet Brown's North Philadelphia house and see the roaches scatter. Though they run like a retreating army, they're rarely beaten, living well in walls and small spaces, often moving easily from one home to the next in low-income neighborhoods with endless blocks of aging rowhouses. For Brown and her son, Ronnie, 11, exposure to roaches means asthma. "Last year, he was hospitalized six times," Brown said. "It wears me out. " When you're poor, Brown knows, you live with vermin, an extra layer of low-income misery.
SPORTS
March 22, 2013 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOS ANGELES – During a four-game homestand that saw them play some of the better basketball of the season, the 76ers put together some impressive wins against teams like Indiana, Brooklyn and Portland, But the brutal reality of where they stand in the NBA pecking order reared its ugly face again as the Los Angeles Clippers completed a season sweep of them at the Staples Center on Wednesday, easily beating the Sixers 101-72. The Sixers loss extended their road losing streak to 14 games.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Dale Gavlak, Associated Press
ZAATARI, Jordan - A winter storm is magnifying the misery for tens of thousands of Syrians fleeing the country's civil war, turning a refugee camp into a muddy swamp where howling winds tore down tents and exposed the displaced residents to freezing temperatures. Some frustrated refugees at a camp in Zaatari, where about 50,000 are sheltered, attacked aid workers with sticks and stones after the tents collapsed in 35-m.p.h. winds, said Ghazi Sarhan, spokesman for the Jordanian charity that helps run the camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Let's play a word association game: If I say "Mister Man," what image comes to mind? How about "hobbling?" "Dirty birdie?" For much of the moviegoing public, these associations end at the 1990 film adaptation of Stephen King's thriller Misery , with Kathy Bates' deranged nurse and "number-one fan" Annie Wilkes looming over James Caan as her bedbound prisoner, romance author Paul Sheldon. Bates' Oscar-winning performance also looms over Bucks County Playhouse's world premiere stage play Misery , also adapted from King's novel, and that's exactly the problem with this production.
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